Reports From This Organization

Motley Zoo Animal Rescue: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

See below.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

See below.

How many pets did this grant help?

Three

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We had a birthday party for Sweetie (http://bit.ly/2LbtGuw), a dog who had been in our care for two years. She is a special-needs dog who really isn’t terribly difficult, but her neurological deficit and micro hepatic liver shunts have been obstacles that have caused people to overlook her. We celebrated her birthday at our dog daycare with fosters, friends and volunteers, hoping that this would not foreshadow her celebrating her third birthday without a forever home. We had a TV crew there and she was featured on QFox13 as the pet of the week!

As a result of the TV coverage of her sponsored party, we received many applications for her, although none were fully prepared to adopt her in the end. As it turned out, love was right under our noses, which we discovered when a foster (who’d been relatively inactive for the past few years) agreed to sit her for the weekend when her regular foster went out of town. It was an instant connection between her and the foster’s dog (whom she’d also adopted from us)! For two years they had seen each other from afar, but it was never considered until she was in that foster’s arms. This is one of our most heartfelt adoption stories to date, and we are so grateful to Orvis and the Petfinder Foundation for the opportunity.

We also used the grant funds to take care of some of the grooming needs of another dog (since adopted) and we are still planning a party for another dog, Whitney Houston, a blind critical-care case who is not yet listed for adoption. This will be another group celebration with TV coverage when she’s ready, and will hopefully result in her eventual adoption! We are so grateful for the opportunities this grant has provided our animals — thank you!

Motley Zoo Animal Rescue: Sponsor a Pet Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Money received from Sponsor A Pet

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Donations helped three adoptable pets.

How many pets did this grant help?

3

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

The twisted sister puppies (first photo) were born with deformities. Queenie (second photo) just needed a chair, but Mrs Vanderbilt (third photo) needed an amputation of one back leg. Apollonia (fourth photo) was a cat who was found paralyzed and pregnant. After she had a c-section and we gave her babies to a surrogate, she has come a long way. At first she could not even urinate or defecate on her own, but now she can do both, and even sit up and stand. Every day she gets better. She doesn’t love her chair, but it’s meant to help her stabilize and build up leg strength again.

Meet Mrs. Vanderbilt: https://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/35132985

Motley Zoo Animal Rescue: All-Star Dog Rescue Celebration Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We are using the funds to produce training videos. We were delayed for a bit because our selected videographers were away (fishing in Alaska), but we’ve started scripting and storyboarding as well as doing some preliminary filming. We’re in production, though it will still take some time, as the project is very intense. We are literally filming everything from the minute you think about fostering, to getting your animal, to what you do when you get him or her home, as well as training techniques and processes, as well as common issues such as resource-guarding and barking, nipping and such. This is a long-term project, but one we know will be shared with other rescue organizations. It really is a monumental undertaking, one we don’t want to do anything but a stellar job on.

The videographer has a deep investment and commitment in the organization as well, which means we’re supporting a business that also supports us, which is pretty important to us as well. We will be thrilled to announce the completion of the videos, we hope within the next three months. We are so grateful for this opportunity and we are honored that we were chosen. We will not let the foundation down with this effort.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant will help hundreds of animals, and more over time. That is a very general statement, we know, but being able to have videos that specifically outline every little detail of how we want fosters to manager their animals, work with training issues, and more, will help add some consistency to our foster program. We hope that these videos, when shared, will also help other organizations — perhaps especially those just starting out, seeking some kind of easy way to show fosters how to work with their animals. These videos could literally be the difference between a dog staying in a foster home — or even an adoptive one — and one who comes back to the shelter or gets deemed to have “issues.”

Many of the situations fosters deal with are simple enough that, with proper instruction and guidance, they can be solved within the home through these videos, but we believe that no matter the problem, with this kind of empowerment, foster families will be able to graduate to taking on more difficult situations in time. We believe too that, with this kind of consistency and support, fosters will trust us and communicate with us better, which will ensure deeper, longer-lasting relationships — which means more animals can be saved in time.

How many pets did this grant help?

350 per year

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

One of the videos we have is about how to load an animal in the car. It is not enough to tell someone to hold onto the leash; this simply doesn’t register enough because they don’t understand the consequences of a dog getting loose, especially a really fearful one. Two dogs that we have had like this are sisters, Phoebe (first photo) and Paige (second photo) — cattle dog mixes who lived outside for the first year of their lives. They both have a vestibular condition in which their heads are cocked, and both are exceptionally skittish — screaming, pooping and peeing when you reach for them, at least at first. At one point, each has gotten away from their fosters — even very skilled ones — and we are using them as the prime example of how difficult it can be to load an animal into a car.

This video shows specifically how the animals can freak out and flail, or try and back out of the car. While a bit sad to see something simple be so hard for them, it really drives home to fosters how each animal can act — some you can expect this of them and others will surprise you. By not only keeping the leash on, attaching it to something solid in the car and making sure you have a good hold before the door opens, the video shows different ways to keep dogs from getting away when you’re just trying to get them home.

Phoebe has since been adopted and is doing great. Paige is still struggling a bit, getting better and then worse with her behavior. She will be featured in other videos too, for this very reason! We are dedicated to her indefinitely and we offer her every training option possible, as well as dog daycare, and her foster is really skilled. Paige is just a tough one, but her example — and hopefully her improvement in other videos — can help others as well with dogs that can be very trying and longer-term.

Motley Zoo Animal Rescue: Cat Chow Building Better Lives Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The funds from this grant were used to offer reduced-fee cat adoptions for the cats in our shelter.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Being able to offer reduced-fee adoptions helped us to get more cats adopted as well as find homes from some cats who had been with us long-term.

How many pets did this grant help?

30

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Jewel and Dido (used to be Kori and Kuri) are the most significant story of our use of funds from the Cat Chow Building Better Lives grant. They came to us months ago as a bonded pair. We expected they’d go pretty quickly as they were sweet and friendly, though one a tad more shy than the other. They were staying at one of our partnering pet stores and suddenly started losing hair. A vet’s visit determined they had acquired ringworm, which is a terrible nuisance, though not actually dangerous — however, many animals die in shelters every year for this very treatable condition people fear so much. Our rescue actually takes in dozens of ringworm cat cases every year in an effort to reduce this number, so although we have plenty of experience, this was unexpected and disappointing for these girls.

It took a while for them to get better — the average recovery time is 6-8 weeks. We were able to get them back to one of our partnering stores, but after a short period, the girls became sick — one with a urinary-tract issue and the other with some digestive upset. The culprit and theme behind all of these health issues is, unfortunately, stress — we knew that, in a home environment, they would recover and be healthy, but cats do not get adopted out of foster homes like our dogs do; they really need to be “on display” to show off their personalities to potential adopters.

Although these girls had plenty of interest, no one ended up adopting them for ages. They either changed their minds about adopting, or got kittens instead, or any of a number of weird and disappointing reasons not to pick them. We were starting to become very sad and frustrated for them. Then we received the Cat Chow Building Better Lives grant and were able to reduce their adoption donation significantly, and this spurned new interest in them. Finally, out of the woodwork came their new mom!

We were so happy to finally get them adopted, we practically had a party for them. The employees at their pet store were cheering and so excited. We are just so happy for them and can’t wait to hear more updates about their new fun lives as the queens of their domain! We’re thrilled they can stay together too 😉

Motley Zoo Animal Rescue: WAHL Grooming Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We have been providing to fosters and new adopters so they have something quality to use to get their pet started on the right foot. We have also used some to bathe dogs just before adoption so the pups smell nice, and the people want to use more!

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant has helped us provide a quick and easy solution for fosters and adopters that is portable and handy. This has been a great benefit to our animals with allergies and skin issues, so that the fosters have something that cleans the pets well, but also smells good and not like medicine!

How many pets did this grant help?

25 so far

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Bugsy is a little guy who has been in care with us, sadly, for a year. He recently started smelling yeasty and experiencing some skin infections. We have been using the shampoo to bathe him regularly, especially before events, so that he looks and smells his best, while we tackle fighting the infection with food and meds 🙂

Motley Zoo Animal Rescue: A Shot at Life Vaccination Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

vaccines for dogs and cats

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

we were able to vaccinate many animals with this grant (we are still using the cat vaccines), and this has greatly helped in terms of our budget. We have had a couple of emergencies that would have left us a bit strapped, but instead we had the funding for them- AND had the vaccines too. Good not to have to choose between a shot and a life!

How many pets did this grant help?

35 so far

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Tim and Adina are two cats this grant helped- they were named after the punk band Rancid…well as all the band members are guys, Adina is named after a song 🙂 The band came into town and I took the kittens down to meet their namesakes, to see if we could get a meet and greet with the band, get some cool pics…as you can see the guys were very accommodating and it was a big hit! They even put me on the guest list for the night…Tim and Adina are still looking for their home (we hope together), but with this cool publicity we have had renewed interest in them, people asking for apps…hopefully soon they can go home!