Reports From This Organization

Humane Society of Utah: Cat Enrichment Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The generous $1,000 grant from the Petfinder Foundation was used to purchase items to stock our new enrichment room with, including cat toys, beds, and supplies to be used for cats who are awaiting adoption at our facility. The toys we purchased include items like target sticks, spinning balls, cardboard scratchers, catnip toys, Kong balls, teaser wands, and bed caves.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Enrichment improves our ability as a shelter to help with behavior and training issues while supporting the overall health of our animals. Enrichment also decreases stress in animals, which decreases the rate of illness. Our new enrichment room is a tremendous asset to the shelter, and having the necessary toys and supplies for the cats helps provide them with an environment where they are engaged and healthy, which ultimately increases their adoptability.

How many pets did this grant help?

With help from the Petfinder Foundation, we are able to offer enrichment opportunities to all the cats who enter our shelter. Over the next 12 months, we anticipate adopting out approximately 235 cats, and they will all benefit from the supplies and toys we purchased using the generous Petfinder Foundation grant.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

As a sassy 5-year-old cat, Elsie (first photo) served multiple bite quarantines during her stay because she only enjoys being pet on her terms. Once we introduced interactive toys and clicker training, she became a completely different cat. With the enrichment, we showed her ways to interact with people that still allowed her to be social but didn’t always involve petting. As training progressed, she became easier for staff and visitors to handle, and the clever girl even learned how to jump through a hoop. After 136 days at Utah Humane, she went to loving forever home.

Humane Society of Utah: Purina New Year, New Home Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was used specifically to offset and waive adoption fees for cats in our care.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Many people seek to adopt pets, but since we provide significant veterinary care to animals relinquished to us, we do have an adoption fee so that we can cover our costs and remain operational. But, because there are adoption fees, some people are unable to adopt pets because they may not have immediate funds to cover the fees. As a result, we seek funding to offset adoption fees so that pets who are able to be adopted can go to loving homes. This grant provided waived adoption fees to cats waiting to be adopted. We focused on cats who had been in our shelter for 20 or more days.

How many pets did this grant help?

68

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

When we received Madam (first photo) at the Humane Society of Utah, she appeared timid. She was not as playful as other cats. Due to her age (11), she was with us for over a month. We decided to use the Petfinder Foundation cat adoption-fee waiver program to find her a family. She was adopted by a couple without kids because she prefers a quiet and relaxed home and she is now thriving with her new family.

Kiki (second photo) came to the Humane Society of Utah fearful of new people and she also had little interest in other cats. We found that she was not doing well in our adoptions center, as there are many cats waiting to be adopted there. She was fostered in an office with a staff person for a month while we worked to find someone to adopt her who could provide the kind of environment where she could thrive. We were able to waive her adoption fees through the Petfinder Foundation program and found a loving family who had recently had their senior cat pass away. Kiki is now thriving in her new home as the sole feline in the house.

This grant provided waived fees for cats to be adopted. We were able to adopt out 56 cats using these funds. Also we worked with seniors interested in adopting cats and we matched them with cats who had been in our shelter for 20 or more days. These funds were able to be used to match up seniors with these cats. Overall, 68 cats were adopted into loving homes with these funds.

Humane Society of Utah: Purina New Year, New Home Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We were able to use the $2,000 grant to run two adoption specials. The first special ran June 4-10, 2018, on cats. This was very useful because we had an abundance of felines in our care who were in need of finding homes and this special helped get 28 of them adopted. The next special we ran was for our state holiday, Pioneer Day, on July 24. We ran the special July 23 and 24 called it Petoneer Day. We offered $24 discounts on all adoption fees for these two days, which helped an additional 28 cats, dogs, and other animals find new loving homes. The remaining funds were used toward our own internal special we offer year-round, which is that any animal who has been with us for longer than 20 days or who is 7 years or older has a waived adoption fee. This helped us adopt seven cats and four dogs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped us offer waived or reduced adoption fees on 67 of our cats, dogs, and other animals. This helped offset some of the other costs of maintaining our shelter in order to help even more animals in need than we would otherwise have been able to.

How many pets did this grant help?

67

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

All of the 67 pets were adopted into loving homes during the time this grant was available. This means none of them are still adoptable, but there are two stories I would like to share. Jun (first photo), a 2-year-old chocolate point snowshoe cat, went through a lot to find her new home. She was transferred to our facility in May 2017. Since then, she was adopted and returned to us three times for reasons outside of her control and for no fault of her own. She had become very nervous at the shelter, but finally, she was adopted on June 6, 2018, during the Petfinder Foundation cat-adoption special, and we have a good feeling this home will be her permanent one!

Penny (second photo), a 9-month-old Lab mix, was surrendered to us at the beginning of July. Originally the owners wanted to euthanize her because she had acquired mange in their home they were using for dog breeding and they couldn’t afford to treat it. Fortunately, we convinced them to surrender her to us so we could help her. She was treated in a foster home until she recovered. She was very timid and was learning to come out of her shell during this time. She needed a very special, patient adopter who would be willing to spend considerable time and energy building her confidence. We are happy to report that she was adopted on July 23, 2018, during our Petoneer Day adoption special that the Petfinder Foundation supported.

Humane Society of Utah: Build-A-Bear Youth Humane Education Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Funding from the Petfinder Foundation was used to support the salaries of our full-time Humane Education Director and full-time Humane Education Coordinator. From the time funding was received from the Petfinder Foundation in August until today’s date (11/6/17), the director and coordinator have been able to give humane education presentations to a total of 3,668 children through our annual H.E.R.O. Summer Camp, classroom visits, and birthday parties. Additionally, our Humane Education staff have already begun preparations for 2018 summer camp and plan to extend it from four weeks to eight. The purpose is to engage and cater to children from first through eighth grades on their individual grade levels.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

These presentations offer stimulating perspectives and invite discussions about animal welfare and advocacy in a variety of ways. They teach children about the importance of spaying and neutering to decrease the number of homeless animals, proper pet care, the importance of adopting rather than buying, understanding animal behavior, and how to interact with animals.

Through our year-round education program and our summer camp, we have seen children become more empathetic and gain a deeper and more profound understanding of animal behaviors and needs. We have observed that, as the community learns more about the humane treatment of animals as well as adoptable pets from the HSU, they look to us as a resource for these issues and are more likely to adopt from us. This type of education immediately affects how children interact with the animals they meet and has led to more pet adoptions from our shelter.

We have noticed a tremendous impact over the two years since we started visiting schools. At the beginning, most, if not all, of the students, particularly kindergarten through sixth grade, did not know the definition of spaying or neutering. Now when we visit, at least 1/3 of the students can state not just what it means but why it’s important. In general, students seem much more aware of how to meet a dog properly and what animals need in order to be happy, healthy and safe. We have also noticed an increase in teachers implementing animal curricula into their syllabus and requesting monthly visits to their classrooms to teach humane education lessons.

We have had reports from teachers stating that students who normally display behavior issues are calm and improve when we visit. They listen and seem happier than at any other time during the school day. We have also observed that students we visit monthly are much more kind and respectful of each other when animals are present. When we come into a noisy room, the students immediately change their noise level to make the animals feel safe and comfortable. They are gentle with the animals, and many students state that they would like to work or volunteer with animals when they are old enough. These behaviors improve with each visit, and we see that the students are eager to learn.

We’ve even learned that some of the students’ families have recently adopted from shelters rather than purchasing as a direct result of our visits to their classroom. The grant from the Petfinder Foundation has allowed us to continue offering these presentations and services to families. As a result, the animals have benefited.

How many pets did this grant help?

To date, we have found positive outcomes for 8,500 animals. Education promotes general advocacy of all animals in our care, so all animals who come through our shelter benefit from this grant.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Several children who attended summer camp adopted pets from the Humane Society of Utah as a direct result of attending camp. One camp attendee fell in love with Ginger, a 4-year-old Dachshund mix, during her week at camp. She introduced Ginger to her mother, who had no intention of adopting a new pet. This sweet girl, however, stole her heart and they made the decision to make her a part of their family. Ginger is thriving in her new home with her canine sister, Pepper! Please see the attached photos of Ginger with her family. The second photo is the day Ginger was discovered and adopted during camp. The third is of GInger with her sister, Pepper. Also, the first photo is the screenshot of the Facebook post we put up thanking the Petfinder Foundation for their support.

Humane Society of Utah: Sponsor a Pet Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Brooke was adopted before this Sponsor A Pet donation was received. The donation was used for general funding for all supplies, services and employees necessary to care for 13,000 animals each year.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This donation is extremely helpful in making it possible for us to have saved 11,318 pets in 2015.

How many pets did this grant help?

8

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This funding could be considered as providing intake vaccinations for EIGHT dogs. The dog who was sponsored was Brooke (pictured). Brooke was adopted before this Sponsor A Pet donation was received. The donation was used for general funding for all supplies, services and employees necessary to care for 13,000 animals each year.