Reports From This Organization

Corridor Rescue, Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant we were awarded was used to help with a lifesaving surgery for a puppy, Jeremiah, whom we rescued off the streets of Houston.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped defer monies needed for a lifesaving surgery for a puppy rescued by Corridor. With the grant funds and other donations, we were able to cover a portion of the surgery costs. This allowed us to continue to help another street dog in need.

How many pets did this grant help?

One directly, two to three indirectly

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Jeremiah was rescued as a stray with his siblings off the streets of Houston. Very quickly, we realized that Jeremiah was not well. He was vomiting and not gaining weight and acted as if something was stuck in his throat. When he was seen by a specialist after the general vet said there was nothing stuck, he was diagnosed with persistent right aortic arch (PRAA). It is a congenital abnormality of the blood vessels of the heart that can affect esophageal function in some dogs. Basically, an embryonic branch of the aorta fails to regress and is wrapped around the esophagus when the dog is a puppy.

The only way to resolve this is to surgically remove the embryonic branch. Due to the stricture, Jeremiah’s esophagus was enlarged where food would become stuck. This enlargement did not completely rectify itself after the surgery, so Jeremiah now suffers from megaesophagus. This, however, is a manageable special need.

Jeremiah has had a Bailey’s Chair donated to him (third photo) that will continue to grow with him. Should he outgrow it, they will replace the chair and we will pass his on to another dog in need. Other than having to eat a soft diet in a special chair, Jeremiah is a typical 7-month-old puppy. He loves to play with other dogs and loves to be with people. Meet Jeremiah here.

Corridor Rescue, Inc.: Dogs Playing for Life Mentorship Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We sent two kennel employees to the three-day Dogs Playing for Life mentorship session at Austin Pets Alive! to learn how to integrate our rescue dogs into playgroups safely.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We currently have a kennel facility that houses up to 30 dogs. Most of the dogs in our care at the kennel were not in foster homes due to either unknown or known restrictions with other dogs. They had outside time, but were unsocialized with other dogs. This grant allowed our two staff members to begin integrating rescued street dogs who were once thought to be “dog aggressive” into playgroups ranging from two to eight dogs. This has not only allowed us to reevaluate our dogs’ ability to be adopted into a home with other dogs, but has also increased each dog’s time spent outside his or her private kennel. We have seen destructive behaviors diminish as well as the dogs’ overall temperament improve! These playgroups have allowed us to better present our dogs to potential adopters and adopt out into multi-dog households dogs who before would have been labeled “only-dog.”

How many pets did this grant help?

30-60 currently, but it will continue to help every dog we rescue going forward.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

The most dramatic story is about Bo and Gypsy. Bo (the brown-and-white dog in the photos) is actually our rescue mascot. He is the dog on our logo. He was a solitary male out on the streets for over three years before he was rescued. We’d had two encounters with him going after another dog on a lead, so we had deemed him “dog-aggressive.” Gypsy (the black dog in the photos) was in a foster home initially and we were told by that foster when she returned to the kennel that she too was dog-aggressive. With the tools gained at the DPFL mentorship session, our two staff members slowly introduced Bo and Gypsy. To everyone’s delight, the pair hit it off very well and are now rowdy playmates. Both are still looking for their forever homes.
Meet Gypsy: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/40619435
Meet Bo: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/37029153

Corridor Rescue, Inc.: Purina and Amazon Treats for the Holidays Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The product was used to provide treats for dogs and cats living on the streets and dogs that have been rescued by Corridor Rescue. The cat treats were used to help trap, neuter and return cats.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The treats were used to help trap cats for neuter to reduce pet overpopulation.

How many pets did this grant help?

35

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

The treats helped trap stray cats to get them neutered. These cats were trapped in a low-income part of Houston where animals are often neglected and abandoned. No one takes care of these cats, so Corridor Rescue volunteers work hard to get these cats needed medical treatment and neuter. The cats love the treats and are more easily located.

Shadow (pictured) has been adopted. From his Petfinder profile: “Shadow was found along with his two sisters dumped at the side of the round at just 6 weeks of age. Luckily for them, our feeders spotted them and they instantly were made CRI cats.”

Corridor Rescue Inc.: Sponsor a Pet Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Red was found in the Corridor unable to use one of his legs; it was damaged beyond repair, likely due to his being hit by a car.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Funds were used for the amputation of Red’s leg.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Red was found in the Corridor of Cruelty section of Houston being attacked by other dogs and unable to defend himself. He was taken to an emergency vet where one of his legs was amputated. He is a precious dog who gets along with all humans and animals and was eventually adopted by one of the vet techs at the animal emergency hospital.