Reports From This Organization

Humane Educational Society: Dogs Playing for Life Mentorship Grant (Invitation Only) Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant money was used to sponsor tuition for a Dogs Playing for Life Mentorship Level II.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant helped our organization by allowing a staff member to attend the DPFL Mentorship Level II. With the information and training techniques learned there, we have been able to increase the number of dogs who attend playgroups each day. We have also started some basic command training and are laying the foundation to develop a formal Behavior Department and training program. We plan to do some behavior-modification training with certain dogs who are not showing well at the shelter, which will allow them to be adoptable.

How many pets did this grant help?

1,000 per year

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Quinn is a 7-month-old pup who came to the shelter about a month ago. She was terrified in her kennel, but she showed her fear by growling, snapping, lunging, and biting in the kennel. We were finally able to get her out and on a leash using some of the techniques learned at the DPFL Mentorship Level II. Once she got out to the play yard, her demeanor changed from fear-aggressive dog to playful puppy. We began taking her out to playgroups, and now she is a Playgroup Rock Star! We also started walking her on-leash and saw how quickly she learned commands. She was always intent on what the trainer was doing and so eager to please. She quickly learned sit, down, and place. She has also started to master duration in all of these things. Even though Quinn still needs some work to get her ready for adoption, we now have the tools, training, and confidence to work with her and find her a forever home!

Humane Educational Society: Play Yard Renovation Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was used to update our existing play yards to better meet DPFL recommendations. We extended the smallest yard by 20 feet. We updated an existing fence line with sturdier and safer fencing. We added gates between the three yards and put catch pens at the entrances to each yard. We also got new gates or refenced existing gates.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped the pets in our organization by making the play yards safer and easier to use. The dogs can now be safely collared and let into the yards. The catch pens are also a benefit for getting the dogs out or even separating dogs that may be having difficulties. The gates between the yards help me manage all three yards more safely and efficiently when I am the only leader. We are now able to bring out more dogs each day we do playgroups. The dogs love coming out to groups. The staff love the better fencing and the catch pens. Several staff and volunteers have asked me, “How did we ever do anything without the catch pens?!”

How many pets did this grant help?

Approximately 150 as of now.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Two dogs who came to the shelter very fearful are George McFly (first photo) and Marty McFly (second photo), a bonded pair. We have had them in playgroups since before we did the play yard renovations. When we first tried them, we quickly learned they are gate-darters. Almost every time we opened the gates to let other dogs in or out, these two would try their hardest to run through the open gate. It was frustrating to the volunteers and made doing playgroups very difficult. We had to chase the McFlys around many, many times. Now that we have the catch pens, though, we haven’t had to chase them at all. If they do try to get out, they go right into the catch pen. It sounds like a small thing to be thankful for, but it has saved us from chasing them around many times. It has saved the dogs from getting hurt running around or even escaping the shelter. Since they are fearful of new people most of the time, having them get out of the facility would have made it impossible for us to catch them again. The volunteers and staff are all thankful for the new fencing, gates, and catch pens! I have included photos of the McFlys hanging out in the yards with a whole bunch of their doggy pals. Meet George McFly here. Meet Marty McFly here.

Humane Educational Society: Dogs Playing for Life Mentorship Grant (Invitation Only) Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was used to pay the tuition for a Dogs Playing for Life mentorship in Longmont, Colorado.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped by allowing me the opportunity to attend the mentorship and learn the protocols of the DPFL program, thus giving me the knowledge and tools to implement safe and effective playgroups for the dogs at our shelter.

How many pets did this grant help?

Since starting the playgroups in July, we have had approximately 150 different dogs come out for our playgroups. Each week, more dogs are added to the list of those approved for playgroups, so the number continues to grow.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Zane was a dog who especially benefited from this grant. For a while, he was labeled as a dog who could not be out with other dogs. He was at our shelter for several months hoping to find a forever home. Once we introduced him to playgroups, however, we found that he was one of the most playful, social, and dog-friendly dogs ever. In fact, he became a Playgroup Rock Star and helper dog. Because we learned more about his true personality through playgroups, Zane was able to go on a transport to Wisconsin and was adopted within a week of being there.