Reports From This Organization

Columbia Humane Society: COVID-19 Operation Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

This money was used to help with the general operations of the shelter.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It helped us to keep caring for the animals that are in our care.

How many pets did this grant help?

30

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This is Albus. He was with us at the shelter for a little over a year. He was deaf and reactive with other animals. We knew there was the right placement for him in our community; we just had to find that right person. That day came and he was adopted.

Columbia Humane Society: COVID-19 Operation Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We used this money for general operation expenses of the shelter.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It helped us keep all the utilities on for a month and helped to pay staff.

How many pets did this grant help?

30

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Albus came to us from a Texas shelter a little over a year ago. The money that was provided to help keep our shelter running helped dogs like Albus, who was deaf. Albus is a very sweet guy who needed just that one particular home that was willing to deal with his hearing loss and who was willing to understand the guy that he is. Albus has since found that home in the last month. We are so excited that he is in his new home and that a great life has been created for him. Thank you for your help.

Columbia Humane Society: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We bought 13 new Kuranda beds with the money given to us by the Orvis Animal Care Grant.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Most dogs now have a Kuranda bed in their inside AND their outside kennels. Kuranda dog beds provide a comfortable place for animals to sleep and spend time resting off the concrete when outside. Being off the floor, they are draft-free and warmer than if they were directly on the floor or even if provided blankets. The outside kennels’ floors are often wet (we are located in Oregon) so the beds provide a nice dry spot, as well. Kuranda beds are also excellent for soft-fabric chewers because leaving bedding material overnight can be dangerous to the dogs’ health.

How many pets did this grant help?

Many more than 13 dogs, because the beds are sanitized and reused many times.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

The Kuranda beds are giving comfort to many dogs. One dog who now has a Kuranda bed both inside and outside is Picassa (first and second photos). Picassa came to the Columbia Humane Society through a Puerto Rico shelter partnership. Picassa had a hard life before coming to the shelter. She has now been at CHS for several months and is allowing her loving and happy nature to show. Still somewhat reserved, she is now taking delight in demonstrating her curious and playful side. She now walks well on a leash and has become a favorite of volunteers. Unless eating or sniffing around her outside kennel (she is a great “scent-hound”), she always sits on her new Kuranda bed, except when she is approached — then she jumps up, wagging her tail vigorously in greeting. Hence, the photographs had to be taken surreptitiously through the wire! She is still available for adoption here.

Another dog, or rather puppy, who is making use of her lovely new Kuranda bed is Fern (third and fourth photos). Fern is a little dynamo from a Texas transport partner. She lives in a foster home much of the time, but comes to the shelter during days when her human is at work. She loves her Kuranda bed to jump on as well as rest on! Here she is, nuzzling a treat ball on her bed. She is still available for adoption here.

Sammy (fifth photo) was featured on Facebook and Instagram enjoying his Kuranda bed with blankets to keep him snuggly while at the shelter. Sammy has already found his forever home!

Columbia Humane Society: P.L.A.Y. Pet Beds Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We were awarded Warm Bellies Chill Pads to put in the dogs’ kennels.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

These Warm Bellies Chill Pads gave our dogs a nice, cozy place to curl up in their kennels. We rely on donations for pet beds and blankets and we, and our dogs, appreciate receiving such good-quality pads. The pads are easy to wash, which is important, and can be used multiple times. The pads are used on an elevated bed or on the floor, depending on the dog. Some of our dogs actually take them off the elevated beds to make themselves a little nest on the floor, which suggests they are making their kennel feel safe and a bit more like “home.” Thank you very much for the pads!

How many pets did this grant help?

10+

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Trey and Duncan were two of four dogs who came to the Columbia Humane Society from a dog-meat farm, Farm 13, in South Korea. Humane Society International helped close the farm and transition the farmer into other lines of work. All four dogs were frightened and shut down when they arrived at the Columbia Humane Society, but devoted volunteers and staff have been giving the dogs love, medical care and compassionate behavioral training to prepare them for their forever homes.

Trey (first photo) loves to sit on his Warm Bellies pad now and is learning to enjoy human companionship. He is actually quite a clown as he dances on his hind legs like a furry bear for treats.

Duncan (second photo) is a vivacious little white dog who adores attention and enjoys his mat for not only snuggling but also for belly rubs.

Waylin, a little Chihuahua (third photo), came to the shelter with an intestinal problem that is currently being treated by a veterinarian. He loves curling up on his Warm Bellies pad, but in the photo is currently “at attention” for the treats he hopes are forthcoming!

Bella (fourth photo) was initially adopted in Idaho and brought to Oregon. Her family could no longer keep her and so she was surrendered to Columbia Humane Society. This sweet-tempered and gentle dog really appreciates being able to chill out on her elevated Warm Bellies pad. Currently all the dogs are awaiting their forever homes. Meet Bella here.

Columbia Humane Society: Cat Enrichment Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

With this grant, we were able to purchase kennel enrichment items for 15 of the cats in our care. Each of the cats will be going home with the enrichment stuff also, so that they can have similar experiences at home as at the shelter. The package includes a two-door carrier, toys, arch groomer, play mat and a scratching pad.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped to make the cats more comfortable in our care; it also draws attention from adopters, as they are intrigued by how much the cats are moving and playing in their kennels. It also helps to make the cats feel more comfortable when they go into their new homes because they have stuff they are familiar with.

How many pets did this grant help?

15

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Zena (first photo) was found on the road after her family left her out in the cold and wet weather to fend for herself. She came to the shelter badly matted and very underweight. We recognized right away that Zena had a great disposition and she loved food. We started her in our Cat Pawsative training program and she quickly went to work learning to give a high five and sitting on command. This girl loves to play with her toys and is going to make a family a great life long companion. Meet her: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/42848023

Columbia Humane Society: KONG Toy Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The donated Kongs were used to provide entertainment, fun and general enrichment for dogs while they are at the shelter.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The Kongs provide a great addition to our kennel enrichment program. We find Kongs are rarely donated by the public, and we operate on limited funds so we can rarely purchase any. We have used the donated Kongs as treat- and food-dispensers and also as a means of gaining the trust of more fearful dogs.

How many pets did this grant help?

Ten and counting! The donated Kongs have been used by at least 10 dogs so far and we anticipate using them for many more.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Hugh (first and second photos) came to CHS as a rescue from Israel and is part of our Canaan Rescue Project. He is about 2 years old and can be a little afraid when meeting new people. Kongs have been helpful in gaining his trust. Hugh loves to run and play, and licking food from his Kong is one of the things that he loves best! He is a very fun-loving guy who is going to need a family that will lead him to greatness. He gets along great with other dogs, but can be reactive on leash because he is excited to see them. He loves to run and play. He is protective of his area.

Trouble (third and fourth photos) was brought to the shelter for boarding while his family was moving and, sadly, they never came back. Trouble is about 11 or 12 years old and is no trouble at all! He has only ever been an outside dog. He loves his big, comfy bed and he really likes his treats in a Kong. He is available for adoption at: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/37575975

We call Cody (fifth and sixth photos) our Big Brown Dog. He came to the shelter as a stray and is about 2 years old. He gets along well with other dogs and enjoys playing. He is also very smart, which makes giving him a good life while he’s in a kennel environment a challenge. We try to do everything we can to keep him thinking, and Kongs provide a great puzzle toy. Extracting food that is frozen inside the Kong is one of his favorite pastimes, and when the Kong is almost empty, he likes to chase it around. Meet Cody: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/36973913

Columbia Humane Society: P.L.A.Y. Pet Beds Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The products, 10 P.L.A.Y. beds, are used to make the pets more comfortable and relaxed in their kennels while at the shelter.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We are a small rural shelter and have to rely on donations for items such as beds. These beds give the dogs a warmer and more comfortable place to lie in their kennels.

How many pets did this grant help?

At least 18 so far

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Jade and Joy are just two of the many appreciative and deserving dogs who enjoyed soft P.L.A.Y. beds that were donated by the Petfinder Foundation. Jade (first photo) came to the shelter under protective custody after her owner was put in jail. Her owner did not make any attempt to reclaim her, so she became custody of the shelter. Because she is approximately 8 years old, she is a candidate for our senior-dog program. That means she will receive a complete medical and dental workup before she is placed for adoption. Soon after admission to the shelter, she was diagnosed as having bladder stones. She is currently being fed a special diet that will dissolve the stones. Once she has been medically cleared, we will be able to work on finding Jade a forever home. In the meantime, she is enjoying her great P.L.A.Y. bed on which she loves to cuddle up. We are hoping to find a medical foster for Jade while she awaits a clean bill of health. Meet Jade: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/37161803

Joy (second photo) was found as stray and taken in by a family. After being in their home for about three months, the owner found that she was not compatible with the dog that they already had in their home. She was then surrendered to the shelter. Joy is about 8 years old and so, like Jade, qualifies for our senior-dog program. Joy has received a complete medical workup already, which concluded that she has severe grain allergies, has probably been used as breeding stock her entire life, and she currently has a mammary tumor that may be cancerous. The tumor will be removed at the same time that she is spayed. Further medical attention will be provided as needed after surgery. Joy is a pleasure to have in our kennels and loves to just mellow out and chew her bones on her great P.L.A.Y. bed. Meet Joy: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/37161808