Reports From This Organization

American Lurcher Rescue Project: Senior Pet Adoption Grants Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

This Senior Pet Adoption Grant was used to ready Tucker for adoption by covering neuter surgery, specialist diagnosis and treatment of his vision issue, and eye-drop medication (Tacrolimus compound and Neomycin Polymix B Dex suspension steroid) to stabilize his condition (pannus). Most critically, it was also used for an initial supply of maintenance medications (eye drops) for his adopter and a commitment to supply those maintenance meds for life in his adopted home.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The additional funding this grant provided allowed us to provide the extra, specialized medical attention needed to save Tucker’s vision — stabilizing his condition and halting the progression of the disease. It also removed a significant barrier to adoption by funding the expense of a necessary lifetime treatment plan. Managing his condition means a higher quality of life for Tucker and his adopters.

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Tucker was given to us in June of 2018 as he retired from the field-trial racing industry he had been a part of for over eight years. It was quickly determined that, in addition to needing standard vetting, worming and being brought current on vaccinations, Tucker would benefit from a dental cleaning and had vision issues that looked like pannus [an abnormal layer of tissue over the cornea]. He was seen by a specialty ophthalmology vet who confirmed a pannus diagnosis in July and prescribed a treatment regimen of medicated eye drops to stabilize Tucker’s eyes and a lifetime treatment plan to maintain him. He was also neutered and had a dental cleaning to get him ready for an adoptive forever home. Sweet, easygoing Tucker acted as a very needed blood donor while undergoing the more aggressive, initial phase of treatment. At about the same time that Tucker was seen for follow-up and moved into a reduced maintenance schedule of eye drops, the Petfinder Foundation awarded us a grant and American Lurcher Rescue Project was able to tell potential adopters we would cover the expense of his prescribed eye drops. On October 25, just two weeks after the Senior Pet Adoption Grant award for Tucker, he was adopted into his loving forever home and is thriving in the company of his family and two other small dogs.

American Lurcher Rescue Project: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

On January 18, a complex surgery to repair multiple issues was performed by Dr. Dyce of the Ohio State University Veterinary Medical School. Dr. Dyce cut the tibia bone (in the lower leg) in two places. He realigned the angle at the top of the tibia by cutting a wedge out. This will help Wesley’s knee function correctly. He also corrected the curvature and twist in the tibia by cutting at the middle of the tibia and inserting a bone graft. This will add to the functionality of the knee and help prevent future arthritis. All of this was initially held together by pins and an external fixator device.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We are now six weeks post-surgery, and just a few days ago Wesley had some of the pins removed, though others remain. He needs to return to OSU and see Dr. Dyce in three weeks. We are hopeful he will have the rest of the fixator removed at that point. The lower wedge osteotomy has signs of healing on both sides. The upper osteotomy is healed on one side and healing is progressing on the other side. The doctor was very, very happy with this. Also, it appears that the kneecap is tracking exactly how it is supposed to be in the knee joint. This grant meant we were able to get a very young and otherwise healthy dog the surgery he needed to have a good quality of life on four legs for the first time, and still be able to take more than 20 dogs in real need into our rescue in the months of December and January. This grant means Wesley will run AND we did not turn any others away while undertaking this significant surgery for him.

How many pets did this grant help?

Only one directly – Wesley.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Wesley, an American lurcher-type dog (a greyhound/coonhound mix), was bred for the sport of field trial racing, but apparently suffered an injury to the growth plate in his right tibia when he was a puppy. As he grew to adulthood, his tibia became very malformed. Once the field trial racing owner realized that Wesley was suffering from a significant skeletal defect, he contacted us and asked if we could find him a good home. We had consultations with a few vet clinics and opted to pursue TPLO orthopedic surgery with the Ohio State University to give Wesley the best chance of success. Thanks in great part to the generous support of a medical grant from the Petfinder Foundation, Wesley had his complex double-wedge osteotomy just about six weeks ago and and is recovering beautifully in a wonderful, supportive medical foster home. While he is still technically available for adoption at the moment, we have strong applications for a great home for him and feel he will be running on all fours for the first time in his life in his forever home soon. Meet Wesley: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/39885131