Reports From This Organization

Animal Protective Association of Missouri: Purina Consider A Shelter Pet Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The $7,700 we received from the Petfinder Foundation was used for medical costs associated with preparing pets for adoption, including spay/neuter, vaccinations and microchips.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Every pet adopted from the APA is spayed/neutered, vaccinated, provided with flea and heartworm preventative and microchipped. The adoption fee we charge our adopters does not cover all of these costs. The $7,700 we received helped us cover some of our adoption-preparation costs.

How many pets did this grant help?

154

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Glynn was brought to the APA from the Fulton County Missouri Animal Shelter as part of our Transfer Program on Sept. 14, 2017. Upon intake, Glynn was dewormed, heartworm-tested, and given Advantage Multi as well as a DHLPP and rabies vaccination. Glynn was neutered on Sept. 21. He was now ready to find a family to call his own!

On Sept. 29, a previous adopter came to the APA looking for a companion for their dogs. Glynn was a little shy and our adoption counselors knew that another dog in the household would probably help his confidence. The family met with him and it was a love match — for the humans and the dogs! Glynn was adopted during the Consider A Shelter Pet Campaign, so Purina covered the first $50 of his adoption fee!

Glynn’s new family said it took a couple weeks for him to really come out of his shell, but he has adjusted really well. They can’t imagine life with out him! Glynn is all the way to the left in the attached picture.

Animal Protective Association of Missouri: Pet Transfer Program Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant was used for the APA Transfer Program, which transfers pets to our shelter from higher-euthanizing facilities.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped us transfer a total of 1,024 pets to our shelter in 2015 and give them a second chance at finding forever homes.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant helped 144 animals in the month of December and 1,024 animals total in 2015.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

In December, a rescue group in Phoenix reached out to us to help them with some Chihuahuas that they were having a hard time finding homes for. They had more Chihuahuas than adopters. So on Dec. 6, 2015, the APA received 25 adult Chihuahuas and Chihuahua mixes from HALO Rescue in Phoenix, AZ. They ranged in age from 6 months to 10 years old. When they first arrived, they were a little rattled from the plane ride, but all very sweet and adorable. Out of the 25, two were extremely timid and we found rescue groups that were able to foster them in homes until they find their forever families. The remaining 23 were all adopted within the next 14 days! The APA was very proud to be able to assist 19 shelters/rescue groups in 2015 and 1,024 pets.

Animal Protective Association of Missouri: Pet Transfer Program Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant money was used for the APA’s Pet Transfer Program.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant allows the APA to transfer animals in from other shelters. The money is used to pay for housing, vaccinations, spay/neuter surgeries and preventative medications for the transfer animals. This grant is not only helping the APA, but the over-crowded shelters we are transferring from.

How many pets did this grant help?

In October, the grant helped 94 animals.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Athena, a 3-year-old Jack Russell mix, came to the APA as a transfer from a rural shelter in Missouri on Oct. 13, 2015. Athena was extremely shy and nervous when she arrived at the APA. She had probably been in a few households and at least one other shelter before she arrived at our shelter. The staff at the APA took things slow with her. She was given some extra TLC and hung out in the offices with the back staff before we placed her up for adoption. She slowly began trusting people and loved snuggling in laps. On Oct. 30, a nice woman came to the APA looking for a small lap dog that was already housetrained. One of our adoption counselors thought Athena would be the perfect fit. The woman fell in love, but wanted to sleep on it before she made a final decision. The same woman showed up at 10 a.m. the next morning and said she could not stop thinking about Athena and had to have her! Athena is continuing to come out of her shell in her new home and is doing wonderfully!

Animal Protective Association of Missouri: Pet Transfer Program Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

**NOTE: This grant was made possible in part by a donation from Beggin’.**
Pet Transfer Program

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

During the month of September 2015, this grant helped us transfer 106 dogs into our care at the APA. 66 of those dogs have already found forever families.

How many pets did this grant help?

So far in 2015 this grant has helped 715 animals.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

D.J. was a sweet and happy dog who was brought to the APA Adoption Center as a part of our Pet Transfer Program. He arrived at the shelter on Aug. 6, 2015, a little shy, but very loving. He was placed on the surgery schedule a couple days later to be neutered and placed up for adoption on Aug. 12, 2015. D.J. had a couple visits with potential adopters, but for one reason or another, it was just not a right fit for him or the family. The shelter staff knew that the right family for D.J. was out there — we just had to be patient.

Finally, on Sept. 20, 2015, a family came to the shelter hoping to find a companion for the humans as well as their dog, Bowser. They brought Bowser along with them to meet potential playmates. They asked to see D.J. and it was an instant connection for the whole family, including Bowser.

D.J., now known as DK, and Bowser love playing together at home and do everything together! DK’s family says they are so in love with him and that “he is the best cuddler ever!”

Animal Protective Association of Missouri: Pet Transfer Program Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

**NOTE: This grant was made possible in part by a donation from Beggin’.**
The grant money was used for the APA’s Pet Transfer Program.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

With this grant, the APA was able to transfer 57 pets during the month of August to our shelter from other shelters with higher euthanasia rates. We have transferred 601 pets year-to-date. These transferred pets are vaccinated, spayed/neutered and microchipped, then placed up for adoption.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant helped 59 dogs find homes during the month of August. Year-to-date the grant has helped 553 of the transfer pets find homes.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Missy (first photo) was a sweet 4-year-old old border collie mix who was transferred to the APA on Aug. 19, 2015. She was scared and shy when she came to the shelter. Missy wanted nothing more than to sit next to someone and put her head in their lap. The shelter staff all fell in love with her immediately. We all know it’s sometimes harder for adult dogs to find homes, but we hoped her new family would come soon.

Luckily, she didn’t have to wait too long! On Aug. 27, a gentleman came into the APA and first looked at all of the young puppies we had available for adoption. After petting all the puppies, he told a shelter employee that he knew all the puppies would find homes and asked her to suggest a gentle, older dog who might have a hard time finding a home. Missy, of course, came to mind! He visited with her and really liked her, but wanted to see one more dog before he made his final decision.

He then visited with Buster (second photo), an 8-year-old old beagle mix. He really liked Buster, too! He asked us if we could put Missy and Buster in the room together to see if they got along. Luckily for everyone involved, Missy and Buster were immediate friends. The shelter staff was so excited to see these two adult dogs go home together!

Animal Protective Association of Missouri: Pet Transfer Program Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The APA’s Pet Transfer Program.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant is helping us to grow our Pet Transfer Program. In 2014 we transferred in a total of 414 animals. As of July 2015, we have already transferred 544 animals from other shelters and animal controls. The shelters and animal controls that have partnered with us have seen a reduction in their euthanasia rates since being a part of the Pet Transfer Program.

How many pets did this grant help?

For the month of July, this grant helped 55 pets, and 544 pets total year-to-date in 2015.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Annie and Amelia were transfers to the Animal Protective Association of Missouri adoption center on July 8, 2015 from the Sikeston Humane Society. These 1½-year-old black Lab mixes were siblings and a very bonded pair. We quickly learned that these two dogs did not like to be separated. We housed them together in one of our larger dog kennels. Our dog walkers would try to walk them one at a time and the girls would not have it! The one left behind in the kennel would howl until the other one returned. We knew it would be an easier transition for Annie and Amelia if they were adopted together, but that is not always easy with two adult, medium-sized dogs.

Fortunately for these two, they did not have to wait long for the right family to come along! On July 11, an amazing family came to the APA looking for just one dog and they were thinking about adopting a puppy. They walked through our puppy room and then took a walk through our larger dog kennel. After looking at all the dogs, they asked one of our adoption counselors about Annie and Amelia, who in just two days had become staff favorites.

The family spent about five minutes in a visiting room with the girls and knew they couldn’t leave without them. Upon a follow-up, we have learned Annie and Amelia, now Izzy and Bella, are doing fantastic in their new home!

Animal Protective Association of Missouri: Pet Transfer Program Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Pet Transfer Program

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This money paid for supplies, medicine and salaries for the Pet Transfer Program.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant helped 46 dogs.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Scooter, a pointer mix, originally came to the APA in early February, a transfer from our friends in Texas County, Missouri. This shy pup took some time to acclimate to the shelter environment, and he wasn’t exactly excited about his new living situation. While he was gentle and quiet, Scooter had trouble warming up to strangers, and he would typically ignore the families who tried to visit with him. Without showcasing his sweet side, Scooter was having a hard time bonding with those around him. We entered him into our PRAISE program, an enrichment program that teaches dogs basic commands as well as attention and bonding exercises. Scooter began to show off his smarts and to look forward to working with his human trainers. Those who got to know Scooter through PRAISE saw what a wonderful and affectionate dog he could be. But the problem remained: How could we find a family who would be patient enough to see the same?

One day a lovely couple named Ray and Penny came in looking for a dog. They had recently lost two of their own pups within months of each other, and they were hoping to find the perfect new pooch to love. They looked around and decided to visit with a cute little Beagle and a couple of other dogs, including Scooter. After the visit, they said the same thing that most people said when they visited Scooter: “He just ignored us.” We explained that Scooter is a quiet guy who likes to take his time getting to know people. He could be choosy about his friends, and he didn’t seem to care much for young children. They responded by saying, “Neither do we.” They left the Adoption Center that day and Scooter went back to his kennel.

First thing the next morning, Ray came back to the APA. We told him that we were sorry, but that cute little Beagle had been adopted at the end of the day yesterday. He said that was okay; he was here for Scooter. A cheer went up through the whole building! Our friend had finally found people who were willing to work with him and make him a part of their family. Ray told us that he and Penny used to work with rescued greyhounds, dogs who often need time to adjust to home life after leaving the track. They had the commitment and experience with shy dogs that Scooter needed to come out of his shell.

These days, Penny and Ray say Scooter is doing great! The pup who shied away from human companionship now loves spending his days with his retired dad, and when his mom comes home from work, he’s sure to let her know how much he missed her! Scooter even lets his new people sleep in his king-sized bed and share his sofa with him! We’re thrilled that this special dog finally found the perfect family to love!

Animal Protective Association of Missouri: Pet Transfer Program Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

This funding supported the APA’s Pet Transfer Program.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This funding paid for program supplies, medication, utilities and staff salaries for the animals in the Pet Transfer Program.

How many pets did this grant help?

34 dogs

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Not perfect, but perfect for them: When Eddie arrived at the APA in December 2014, he was coming from a rural area where he had not learned a lot about city living. Because he had never been housetrained, and because he was not neutered, Eddie marked. And marked. Everywhere he went, Eddie left his signature. This, obviously, wasn’t the most desirable trait to see in a potential housemate. So, as with all our animals, we neutered Eddie and started working on housetraining. Eddie also hadn’t mastered a lot of basic pet skills in his life — he jumped on people and pulled on his leash — so we entered him into our PRAISE dog training program, where he did great and learned several basic commands, attention lessons, and how to just be a mellower dog around people.

Although it took a lot of time and love, our dedicated dog walkers provided Eddie both those things in abundance. They came in several days a week to work with Eddie, socialize him, and help him learn. It wasn’t a quick process, but it turned out to be just what he needed. Eddie’s energy levels became more regular, he learned how to walk more calmly on a leash, and he followed the “four on the floor” rule for dog paws.

One day in May, a man came in just to look around at dogs. He wasn’t sure what he was looking for, and he wasn’t planning to adopt anyone that day. We’re always happy to see people taking their time to carefully consider their new pets, so we encouraged him to browse as long as he liked. He left that day and came by again soon after, again just to look. About a week later, he was back, this time with his son, a young man who was very excited to meet a potential new pet. They visited with several dogs before asking to see Eddie. When Eddie came in the room he happily sniffed around for a minute before proceeding right over to the man’s leg and greeting him, Eddie-style. Needless to say, it wasn’t the best way to start a visit.

However, immediately after that misstep, Eddie walked straight over to his son and began showing him affection, licking him and having a great time being petted by him. The young man fell in love with the sweet, sleek black pup, but Eddie is a big responsibility, so the man and his son left to give some thought to the dogs they had visited.

After considering the decision for a few days, the two came back for Eddie, arriving just before we closed at 5:00. The car had barely stopped when the son jumped out of it, rushing inside to pick up his new best friend. Eddie happily greeted his new family members and posed for his adoption photo. His new dad acknowledges that it might take some time for Eddie to become fully adjusted to home life, but they’re ready and happy to work with him because he’s already made himself at home in their hearts.

Animal Protective Association of Missouri: Pet Transfer Program Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

**NOTE: This grant was made possible in part by a donation from Beggin’.**

The money provided funds to be used in our Pet Transfer Program.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It funded medication, vaccinations, utilities and salaries related to the care of transferred pets.

How many pets did this grant help?

101

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

When Lana, a Chihuahua mix, came to the APA, it was her sixth residence, and she wasn’t even 1 year old. She had been bustled around from home to home until our friends at All New Hope Rescue transferred her to us, hoping we could help her finally find her forever family. With a face like Lana’s, we knew it wouldn’t be hard, but we didn’t realize what a special match she would be for one extra special family.

Emily Nienhuis has a heart of gold. Over the past 15 years, she has been a foster mom to 24 children. She has legally adopted four daughters and is in the process of adopting two more little girls. With a heart that big, it’s no wonder Emily was also interested in adopting a shelter pet!

When Emily and her daughter Evelyn came to the APA looking for a furry family companion, they were originally interested in adopting a rabbit. While we did have a bunny, his personality wasn’t well-suited to a home with six children. Our adoption counselor Robert recommended that, if they were open to adopting a dog, they visit with Lana. Her laid-back, tolerant personality made her a good candidate for a home with lots of hands to give lots of love.

As soon as they met her, Emily and Evelyn fell in love! They couldn’t resist Lana’s charm and her snuggly ways and were eager to take her home to introduce her to the rest of the family. During the adoption, Emily asked if we knew any background information on Lana. As a matter of fact, we had a ton of information on Lana’s background; she had come to the APA with a binder full of paperwork from all the places she had been. Emily was amazed by the coincidence: Children entering foster homes bring their Life Books with them. These books help tell their life stories and experiences until they find a family to call their own. What a perfect match for Lana and the girls!

Today Emily says that Lana has been a wonderful addition to their family. She’s a social butterfly who loves playing with all her new human sisters, and she’s brought a healing presence to their home. Children in foster homes sometimes come from traumatic situations, and Lana’s sweet, buoyant spirit has been a comfort and a joy to her daughters. Every night she and Evelyn snuggle on the couch together until they both fall asleep, safe and sound in their forever home. We couldn’t ask for a more perfect ending to this happy tail!

Animal Protective Association of Missouri: Pet Transfer Program Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Pet Transfer Program

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It paid for supplies and salaries for the dogs in our Pet Transfer Program.

How many pets did this grant help?

112

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

John Jay the Shepherd mix didn’t have the easiest start to life. While his exact history is unknown, he came to The Animal Shelter of Texas County (TASTC), Missouri, as a stray who appeared to have been abused. However, he was a sweet dog who seemed eager to please, even if he didn’t have the best manners. The great staff at TASTC decided John Jay was an excellent candidate for their Puppies for Parole program.

This program brings animals in need of additional socialization or obedience training into prisons and gives inmates an opportunity to help those dogs develop skills. The dogs live in the cells with their trainers and spend hours each day developing the skills they need to become wonderful members of the family. After 3-4 months, the dogs graduate and head back to their original shelters to find new homes.

John Jay excelled at the program, and came out knowing seven new skills: sit, lie down, stay, come, shake, roll over, and play dead. Whoever adopted John Jay was getting one heck of a dog! The staff at TASTC decided that this great pup deserved the best opportunity possible to find a new home, and they transferred him to the APA. Within just five days, John Jay found a fantastic home with plenty of kids to play with and to help him stay sharp on his skills. Everyone was so happy to see this wonderful dog find the family he deserved!