Reports From This Organization

Paws for Life Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

For a kitten, Lennon, with a severe upper-respiratory infection and a badly ruptured eye. The grant funds were used for treatment of his URI, for surgery to remove the ruptured eye, and to treat the remaining eye.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant has helped us with funding for the emergency medical care that Lennon required for his URI and ruptured eye. We are continuing to fundraise for and keep supporters updated on the multiple surgeries that he will need to help him breathe and lead a more normal life. Funds like this help Paws for Life Rescue to save more lives.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Sweet little Lennon came into Paws for Life Animal Rescue in October 2018 with a severe upper-respiratory infection and a badly ruptured eye. As he recovered from his enucleation [eye-removal surgery] and was treated for his URI, his foster mom noticed that he continued to struggle to breath. Despite regular steaming treatments to try to open up his airways and antibiotics to treat the URI, he made no progress. Once his URI was gone, he continued to have issues breathing, and as he grew bigger, his foster mom noticed that his chest felt strange and his breathing continued to grow heavier, even as he slept. It became very clear that there was something much worse than a URI going on with our sweet kitten.

While no abnormalities could be found on his x-rays, a CT scan revealed that Lennon had a very deformed sternum that was putting pressure on his heart and lungs, pushing them off to one side and causing his difficulties breathing. In addition to his pectus excavatum, he also had nasal stenosis, a narrowing of his nasal passageway, which caused him to have further trouble breathing and forced him to breathe through his mouth at all times. The older and bigger he gets, the worse his condition would become if left untreated. So the decision was made to give our little fighter every possible chance.

In December 2018, Lennon had the first of several surgeries: a $2,000 ballooning procedure to open up his airways to help him breathe. He handled his surgery like a champ, and is now breathing a bit better. However, this was only the first step. Once he is recovered, he will be moving on to his second surgery to treat his pectus excavatum (the deformity in his chest that causes his sternum to push on his organs).

However, since he is a kitten, this surgery will need to be done in multiple steps over the course of the next several months as he grows. Lennon will need to have his sternum surgically attached to an external cast that will need to be regularly adjusted and tightened so that as he grows, the cast will pull his sternum outward and help stop it from pushing on his lungs and heart. These surgeries are roughly $2,500-3,000, and will hopefully be enough to get him to be able to breathe comfortably.

Lennon is in foster care until his medical treatment, planned over the next few months, has been completed and he is ready for adoption. Therefore, he is not yet posted on Petfinder.

Paws for Life Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant was used to help with the very high medical bills (over $2,200) for a cat requiring eye surgery.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The generosity of the Petfinder Foundation helps us continue to save more lives and ensures the health and care of adoptable pets.

How many pets did this grant help?

One cat

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Shortly after intake, it was noticed Veronica was having some disturbing green discharge and watery eyes while living at Petco as an in-store cat. It seemed like a mild URI, so she went into foster care. Veronica started some eye ointment, and her eyes cleared up a bit. After finishing her 10 days of eye ointment, Veronica still would get occasional discharge, but both eyes appeared normal. Then one day her foster mom came home from work to find Veronica lethargic, not interested in food, and both eyes completely swollen. She was rushed to the vet and began a new round of eye ointment and antibiotics.

She began improving, but then then things once again went downhill. Her right eye was becoming normal, but her left eye was so swollen you could not see the globe of the eye, just a swollen third eyelid. The vets could not determine what was causing these issues, but continued medications, antibiotics and eye ointments.

Finally, once the swelling cleared up, it became apparent that her eye was badly damaged. The globe of her eye looked cloudy and unrecognizable (second photo). After speaking to a veterinarian, it was determined she needed a specialist. An appointment was set up, but days before her appointment she developed a “pimple” on her cloudy globe. The day of her appointment, the ophthalmologist ran several tests, and did a very thorough exam and determined Veronica’s eye had actually ruptured. The globe was now cloudy and underneath all that cloudiness was filled with debris from what used to be her eye.

Surgery was scheduled and Veronica had her eye removed. The ophthalmologist believed that Veronica will recover wonderfully, and be a happy, one-eyed kitty. However, the vets, specialist and the rescue are all still unsure of what could have caused this in the first place. A biopsy of her eye will be sent out for histopathology.

The adorable caged picture of her in a Detroit-area animal shelter (first photo) quickly made her Paws for Life’s “poster child.” It saddened us to think that she would likely be passed over a lot for adoption due to her having only one eye.

However, after her surgery, Veronica (renamed Kiwi) was adopted by her foster family! Here is their story: “She was the perfect addition to our home. Only having one eye hasn’t slowed her down one bit. She loves shoulder rides, so much so that she’s always trying to climb up my husband. When she was small, she liked to sleep on my husband’s face at night. Now she weighs 9 lbs. and I’m happy to report that she never grew out of that habit 🙂 Her favorite toy in the world is a little spring that she will chase around our wood floors for hours. She has even learned to fetch. We recently found that she LOVES to watch the TV show Planet Earth. She will sit on the couch and binge watch Planet Earth on Netflix. Unfortunately, in December the vet found that her lymphoma (the root cause for her eye issue) had spread to a few lymph nodes and her spleen. Kiwi is now going through chemotherapy treatment and is responding exceptionally well.”

Paws for Life Rescue: Senior Pet Adoption Grants Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Grant funds were used to help with some of the expenses for heartworm treatment, medical care and boarding costs for Josephine, a 9-year-old dog.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

PFL has no paid staff and receives no government support. Every penny donated goes directly to the animals in our care, paying vet bills and purchasing needed supplies. PFL uses a network of loving foster care homes where animals stay until their forever homes are found. In some cases, if foster homes are not available, we use boarding facilities rather than leave a sick or senior animal in a shelter environment. This grant helped to offset some of the costs for Josephine’s medical care and boarding.

How many pets did this grant help?

One senior dog named Josephine

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Nine-year-old Josephine was dumped at Animal Control full of milk; at her senior age, she had just given birth to a litter of puppies. No one knows what happened to them. Josephine tested positive for heartworm and has completed her treatment, and now she really needs to live out her senior days in a forever home. She does not get along with other dogs or cats as she never learned how to share the cuddles she seeks so often. Our volunteers visit her frequently in a boarding facility and all she wants to do is give kisses. Since she was rescued from the shelter four months ago, she has not received one application for adoption. When asked to pose for a picture with direct eye contact, Josephine didn’t hesitate to provide an eyeball — and a kiss, as you can see in the second picture! She is ready for her forever home! Meet her.

UPDATE: Josephine has been adopted!