Reports From This Organization

Upper Peninsula Animal Welfare Shelter: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Dog enrichment toys to reduce boredom and give the dogs at the shelter mental and physical stimulation while they wait to be adopted.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Dogs enjoy having toys, and especially busy toys, to play with. The Boomer Balls work well for dogs who tend to destroy normal balls. The Tug-a-Jug toys have been really helpful — especially since we live in such a cold climate, and they give the dogs an indoor activity.

How many pets did this grant help?

400

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Bruno (pictured) is a dog who is with us now. He is VERY mistrusting of people. We had a great breakthrough with him with the help of the Tug-a-Jug slow-feeder busy toy. He started to know that good things happen with us! From his Petfinder profile: “Bruno is one handsome gentleman! His beautiful gold coat, big bright eyes and unique curly tail are absolutely stunning. But he’s not all looks; he also has the brains too! Bruno is very smart and quick to learn. He falls head-over-heels in love with the people he spends time with and is ready to learn and please them. Bruno falls so in love that sometimes he can be protective of the people he cares about, but with appropriate training is a wonderful companion dog. Bruno was good with other dogs in the past, but would likely prefer a home where he can be the only dog. He loves to go for walks but is just as great at being a couch potato. Bruno is a very big boy and would do best in a home that has big-dog experience.” Meet Bruno here.

Upper Peninsula Animal Welfare Shelter: Cat Enrichment Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

At this time, the Crijo AdoptME cat tree has not arrived yet. When it does, we will be using it in our brand new animal shelter! Our date to move into the new building is mid-November. I am enclosing photos of the cat rooms. The cat room that this will go in is in fear-free colors and has glassed front windows (the tree will be perfect!).

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

I am happy to provide a story when the tree is delivered and set up in the brand new shelter!

How many pets did this grant help?

Hundreds of cats over the next many years!

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We have ordered a Crijo AdoptME cat tree for our new group cat open-feature room. Cats love to be high up, scratch, lounge and have their own space. Providing for your cat’s mental well-being is just as important as providing for her physical well-being. Cats have natural behaviors and needs; to be healthy and happy, they must have opportunities to express those natural behaviors in appropriate ways. A Crijo AdoptME tree would do just that! The cat trees we had (carpeted ones) were very hard to disinfect properly as well as they fell apart after time with so much use. A Crijo AdoptME cat tree unit is a versatile starter unit that can be connected to other Crijo products with a catwalk and/or a cat ramp. The unit offers one bed and two platforms for lounging, along with five areas for vertical and horizontal scratching. The multi-level design offers optimum stretching, jumping and perching opportunities. Since the AdoptME tree is on wheels, it can be moved to the window area so cats can see outside and watch the activity of the outdoors. Having a tree such as this will enhance our cats’ lives, making for happier, healthier cats while they wait for their new, loving homes. A happier, healthier cat is a cat who will be adopted much faster.

Upper Peninsula Animal Welfare Shelter: KONG Toy Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The Kongs are used for enrichment for the shelter dogs to keep them mentally and physically happy while they wait for their forever homes.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We put peanut butter or grain-free wet food in the Kongs and freeze them. The dogs love it.

How many pets did this grant help?

Well we reuse the Kongs over and over after each use (we, of course, clean them) so it’s helping 100s of dogs.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Nahla is a dog for adoption who has been with us for a long time. She is dog-selective so that is holding her back some from being adopted sooner. She is getting stressed at the shelter so we have her in the office with us. She has toys and a comfy bed, but mostly she loves her peanut-butter Kongs! She is the dog in the first photo. Here is her link: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/42684369

Upper Peninsula Animal Welfare Shelter: Sponsor a Pet Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Sponsorship of pets’ care

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Purchase of medication for pets

How many pets did this grant help?

2

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Lenya is still available for adoption. She is in foster care. She has special needs that requires medication. From her Petfinder profile: “Leyna arrived to UPAWS after her beloved owner fell ill and was no longer able to care for her. Leyna is longing to find find a new home where she can be loved and spoiled for the rest of her days. She appears to get along with most other respectful canines and people. What she would love most is a new, loving companion that she can devote herself to. Can you be the retirement home that Leyna longs for? With Leyna’s age, she does have some medications that are necessary to keep her happy and healthy. UPAWS will help to cover the cost of these medications during the transition to her new home. Three months of Leyna’s medication will be offered with her adoption. Leyna is currently in an Adoption Ambassador foster home. You can visit her in her foster home and complete the adoption off-site — no need to come to the shelter. How cool is that?!” Meet her: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/38449423

Upper Peninsula Animal Welfare Shelter: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was used to purchase dog martingale collars and Freedom No-Pull harnesses for the shelter dogs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant helped by having the proper collars and harnesses to make walking our dogs a much more enjoyable experience for the dog and the person walking. It is also a great training tool.

How many pets did this grant help?

Hundreds of dogs will use these collars and harnesses.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

One of our small dogs was very skittish and it was unsafe to walk her, since with regular collars she would pull out of them and could run away. With these new collars, that is not possible.

Upper Peninsula Animal Welfare Shelter: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We used the funds to promote the “dogs for adoption” posts on our Facebook page, which has about 17,000 fans. We featured a dog for adoption and used the grant funds to “boost” the promotion of the dog with a paid boost. This way, the post moved up in newsfeeds and we were also able to reach a bigger and more targeted market/audience. UPAWS’s Facebook Page: http://www.facebook.com/upaws

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We have found that this really helps spread the word for our pets and our shelter and helps pets get adopted. We would list with each ad boost that is has been sponsored by the Orvis Operation Fund and Petfinder Foundation with a link to their pages or websites. Boosting the “dog for adoption” posts (especially harder-to-place dogs) REALLY helped them be seen, shared and adopted!

How many pets did this grant help?

The grant provided a total of 41 dogs for adoption the benefit of Facebook boosted-ad posts. I did an average of $25 per dog for an adoption-post ad boost.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

UPAWS was contacted by volunteers trying desperately to save the lives of two dogs. They were from the Roscommon Animal Shelter (about seven hours away from UPAWS). They had been there seven months and had an expiration date due to their length of stay. They were scheduled to be euthanized ASAP if they could not find a new place to go. UPAWS agreed to take them both, and we arranged to meet the volunteer drivers with a volunteer from UPAWS halfway to pick the dogs up.

Blake is an Aussie-Lab mix. He is 3 years old and he is timid with men until he gets to know them. He cannot be crated. The shelter took him from his owner because the owner kept Blake in a crate that he couldn’t even sit up in. He was terrified of the kennel and growled and barked at people when they walked by.

Tasha is a 2-year-old black-and-white bully-breed dog. She is great with dogs her size and larger. No small dogs or cats. She is a very nice dog but stressed from shelter life for so long.

Once they arrived at UPAWS, we took photos, wrote bios (we ONLY take positive photos and write positive bios). We posted them both individually on Facebook and with the grant money each post was boosted. Blake’s post reached nearly 38,000 people and had almost 300 shares and Tasha reached 40,450 people and had almost 500 shares! That is HUGE! Both dogs were adopted within days! We KNOW 100% the grant boosts helped them both get that extra reach and attention that they needed! Seven months in a downstate animal control in Roscommon and scheduled to be euthanized … one week after transferring to UPAWS and ADOPTED!! The fourth photo shows Blake in his new home.

Tasha’s Facebook ad: http://bit.ly/2hqADqY
Blake’s Facebook ad: http://bit.ly/2iodNyC

Upper Peninsula Animal Welfare Shelter: Shelter+ Challenge Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

$1,000 was used for our general expense account. Food, operation of the building, vet care (this is a huge one!), adoption programs (we frequently
run discount programs), staffing, education, community outreach, spay/neuter programs for the community — these are just a few of the many things UPAWS uses donations and grants for. All help our pets and also help them find loving homes.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The Upper Peninsula Animal Welfare Shelter is an open-admission NO KILL shelter in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. UPAWS is not controlled by outside sources, nor do they receive funding from outside sources. Marquette county does not provide financial support to UPAWS. UPAWS does not hold any political agenda with national organizations such as PETA or the Humane Society of the United States, nor do they receive monetary donations from them. So grants such as these are vital to the ongoing running of our shelter.

How many pets did this grant help?

UPAWS cares for 1,800 pets a year.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

CARMEL is one of many pets helped. She has a open sore that our vets have been treating for months. Grants such as this are used toward much-needed vet care for pets such as Carmel. Carmel is a pretty 5-year-old female spayed orange tabby. She was surrendered because the owner couldn’t afford her pets. She is affectionate, friendly and cuddly. She is litterbox trained and nice and neat. Little Carmel has an allergy that has causes a sore boo-boo on her side, but this hasn’t stopped Carmel from being the sweetest kitty at the shelter! She does wear a cone now while she has her vet-prescribed meds so she doesn’t lick her side. This darling girl is wonderful and she loves her people friends. Carmel takes her medicine like an angel, loves to be touched and enjoys the company of all those that say hello to her. This is a wonderful girl who longs for a kind soul to take the time and really meet her. You’ll see what a sweetheart she is.

Upper Peninsula Animal Welfare Shelter: Shelter+ Challenge Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

$1,000 was used for our general expense account. UPAWS is an open admission no-kill shelter in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. UPAWS is not controlled by outside sources, nor does it receive funding from outside sources. Marquette County does not provide financial support to UPAWS. UPAWS does not hold any political agenda with national organizations such as PETA or the Humane Society of the United States, nor do it receive monetary donations from them. So grants such as these are vital to the ongoing running of our open-admission shelter. We are very grateful to our wonderful community and Petfinder Foundation for awarding UPAWS this grant.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Food, operation of the building, vet care (this is a huge one!), adoption programs (we frequently run discount programs), staffing, education, community outreach, spay neuter programs for the community — these are just a few of the many things UPAWS uses donations and grants for — and all help our pets find loving homes.

How many pets did this grant help?

In 2013 we found homes for 1630 pets.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Carmel s one of many. She has a open sore that our vets have been treating for months — grants such as the Petfinder Foundation $1,000 goes toward much-needed vet care for pets such as Carmel. Here is her bio: Carmel is a pretty 5-year-old female spayed orange tabby. She was surrendered because her owner couldn’t afford her pets. She is affectionate, friendly and cuddly. She is litter box trained and nice and neat. Little Carmel has am allergy that has causes a sore boo-boo on her side but this hasn’t stopped Carmel from being the sweetest kitty at the shelter! She does wear a cone now while she has her vet prescribed meds, so she doesn’t lick her side. This darling girl is wonderful and she loves her people friends. Carmel takes her medicine like an angel, loves to be touched and enjoys the company of all those that say hello to her. This is a wonderful girl who longs for a kind soul to take the time and really meet her — you’ll see what a sweetheart she is.

LEARN more about adopting Carmel here –> http://bit.ly/MeetCarmel