Reports From This Organization

Bond County Humane Society: Sponsor a Pet Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Purchased enrichment items that were added to the community rooms Gizzy and Mystik reside in with other cats. We added baskets for hiding places.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Provided items that enrich the cats’ lives and contribute to a low-stress environment while they are waiting for adoption. We have purchased baskets that are made for knitting supplies, but they work great as hiding boxes for the cats.

How many pets did this grant help?

2

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Gizzy, whom we estimated to be one year old, and her 4-week-old kitten, Mystik, were brought to us as strays in September 2018. Gizzy was caught in a live trap in a corn field. She has beautiful green eyes. She is easygoing and friendly. She likes to help the volunteers when they are scooping litter boxes or doing any other task. She is our little four-legged helper. Gizzy likes to be petted and will rub against everyone who enters the room. She gets along with all the other cats that live in her community room. Meet Gizzy here.

Bond County Humane Society: Sponsor a Pet Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The donation was used to provide both day-to-day and medical care for Mystik, a cat.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant helps us cover some of the costs associated with housing, feeding, and enriching animals’ lives and providing medical care to the animals in our care.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Mystik is a 2-year-old female cat who entered our shelter in March 2018. She was rescued along with her two kittens, Aspen and Blizzard, from our local animal-control facility. Mystik is a little shy, so she doesn’t make herself readily available to people for petting and holding. She is sociable and friendly with people she knows, but not with strangers. Mystik lives in one of our community rooms along with seven other cats. She needs a home that will give her the chance to be the wonderful, sweet cat we all know she is. Meet Mystik here.

Bond County Humane Society: Senior Pet Adoption Grants Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant funding was used to waive Ellie’s adoption fee and provide her medications for a year. BCHS purchased the majority of her supplements prior to adoption. A portion of the prescribed medications were also purchased. The remainder of the prescribed medication would be purchased at a later date to ensure the medication would not expire.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It allowed our organization to redirect the funding used for Ellie’s medication to other animals in need without sacrificing her well-being. The grant allowed us to also waive Ellie’s adoption fee without negative impact to the organization’s financial status. It improved Ellie’s adoptability. It also covered some of the past veterinary expenses associated with diagnosing Ellie’s condition.

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Ellie was originally rescued by Bond County Humane Society from an animal control facility in southern Illinois. The animal control person had thought Ellie was pregnant because she had a distended stomach. BCHS had x-rays done nine days after her arrival to determine her medical status. At that time, there was no sign of puppies. The x-rays were repeated in two weeks. Again there was no sign of puppies. Ellie was then spayed. A few weeks later, she was diagnosed with atypical Cushing’s disease. An ultrasound was conducted and results from that indicated that Ellie had an enlarged liver and spleen. It was also determined that she was 8-9 years old, much older than originally thought. The veterinarian recommended that Ellie remain on the prescribed supplements and medications for the rest of her life.

Later on, Ellie was also diagnosed with hypothyroidism and prescribed a medication that would be required for the rest of her life. There was also a suspicion that Ellie had an adrenal tumor, but surgery was not recommended because of the fatality rate, and side effects if she survived. Ellie was a happy dog and always ready for a walk and sniffing out rabbits. Ellie was living in a foster home until she suddenly passed away on June 26, 2018.

Bond County Humane Society: Purina New Year, New Home Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Adoption fees were either reduced or waived on some cats and dogs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It allowed us to reduce or waive adoption fees to encourage adoption of the animals without negatively affecting our financial status.

How many pets did this grant help?

Eleven dogs and seven cats.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Here are three pets’ stories, pictured with their new adopters, who have already benefited from the “New Year, New Home” grant program! Jinx (first photo), a 2-year-old brown striped tabby cat, found her furever family on Saturday, April 14, 2018, at Petco in Fairview Heights, Illinois. Jinx was surrendered to Bond County Humane Society by her owner in Spring 2017. Miss Jinx was a new mom of three kittens, but she was not nursing them; the veterinarian and BCHS determined this was because she was so young and didn’t know what to do. BCHS volunteers tried bottle feeding, but the kittens couldn’t be saved. Her sadness is over now. Adopting an adult cat is great because they show their true personalities: Miss Jinx is an active cat, very friendly with people, gets along with other cats but prefers to play alone. She stays busy playing games with toys by herself: jumping, gnawing, batting, and snuggling. We are happy to have met you and helped you on your journey to your FUR-ever home, Jinx!

Happy Adoption Day to Snoopy (second photo)! The 5-year-old German shorthaired pointer mix found her forever parents on Friday, April 13, 2018. Snoopy was rescued by Bond County Humane Society from Bond County Animal Control after her previous owners surrendered her, not being able to keep her any longer. She is good with kids and most other dogs and she has some basic training under her collar. The BCHS volunteers think her “down” looks like a bow or curtsy! Happy tails, Snoopy in your new permanent, loving home! Practice your leash walking and get your obedience classes in before football season (go, Chicago Bears!).

Tabitha (third photo), an 8-month-old Chihuahua-dachshund mix, found her forever family on Saturday, April 14, 2018, at Petco in Fairview Heights, Illinois. Tabitha and a littermate were rescued by Bond County Humane Society from Bond County Animal Control after their previous owners surrendered the pups. Tabitha loves to sit on people’s laps and play with toys. She’s great at fetch and loves all the attention. We’ll miss you, Tabitha, but are certainly glad to send you off with your new “leash” on life!

Bond County Humane Society: Purina Consider A Shelter Pet Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The Purina Consider a Shelter Pet Adoption Grant, given as $300, was used from October through December 2017 to subsidize the adoption fees of several pets (dogs and cats), all of whom found great homes and are no longer available for adoption.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Bond County Humane Society depends upon the generosity of those like the Petfinder Foundation and Purina to get our pets into the public domain AND to get them adopted. In the case of each of the pets adopted through the Purina Consider a Shelter Pet Adoption Grant, s/he got a loving, forever home in part due to the $50-off adoption so helpfully provided by this grant. We are grateful that the adoption of these six pets also gave us the ability to help six other homeless pets.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant helped six pets and their new families, and also freed up our shelter’s resources to save six other pets in their places!

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Dear Petfinder Foundation and Purina: Hello, and thank you for asking about the stories of some of the several pets assisted by this grant. One of the pets and her family who were helped by this Purina/Petfinder Foundation grant is a chocolate Lab named Kona. Kona’s guardian reports that “she loves to play [and] hugs me every morning … and gives kisses. She loves to help me bring up food from my freezer. She will also bring in the mail for us.” Kona is in training and a very eager learner.” The cute first photograph shows the ever-helpful Kona!

Another pet assisted by this PFF/Purina grant is a cat who was renamed Ollie. Ollie shares a home with another cat named Khaleesi and, as you can see in the second photo, the two are inseparable, always grooming each other and just playing or snoozing. As you can see, Ollie played the “Game of (New) Homes” as well as his cat-pal Khaleesi! His guardian, Helen, loves him, as he “fits right into the family.”

Yet another family adopted a yellow Lab named Boomer (third photo). They report that they “love having him, and adopting him was easily one of the best moments of 2017! We are thankful to the Humane Society and Purina for having the event. He has become part of the family so easily. Thank you guys for giving our family the perfect addition” in Boomer. That’s a bada-boom-bada-bing, slam-dunk adoption for Boomer!

We are happy to report that six pets were adopted thanks to Purina and the Petfinder Foundation’s caring, and this is a small sampling of those pets and their families. Thank you, PFF & Purina!

Love,
BCHS

Bond County Humane Society: Petfinder 20th Anniversary Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was used to purchase building materials which helped get us closer to completing our badly needed cat shelter building. As you can tell in the photos, there is still work to be done as soon as additional funding becomes available. The first two photos show the building prior to receiving the grant, and the second two show work we were able to complete with your support.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

BCHS was founded more than 14 years ago to provide temporary sanctuary for unwanted, lost and neglected animals and placement in loving and responsible homes. We are dedicated to doing all we can to improve animal welfare and to stop euthanasia of adoptable pets. For the past seven years, our office/cat-rescue operation has been temporarily located in a small, rundown, 60-year-old county maintenance building. In most cases we are the only hope of survival for the stray and abandoned cats in our community. The size and condition of our existing building drastically limits the number of cats we are able to help. We urgently need a facility that is safer, larger, more efficient, and provides a healthier environment for the cats.

Increasing expenses and the further deterioration of the old building caused us to take action. We launched a capital campaign last year to fund construction of an annex to the existing BCHS dog shelter located a couple of miles away. The new addition will provide air-controlled community rooms for cats, an isolation room, food prep/storage room, laundry room, meet-and-greet room, adoption center, conference/education room, reception area and business office.

The campaign was promoted on our website, Facebook, newsletter, local newspapers and radio. In addition, we established an online fundraising site, and we are designing a memorial-garden area located next to the new building which will include memorial bricks that can be purchased to raise additional funds for this project. The capital campaign, including the Petfinder Foundation grant, has enabled us to get as far as we have and we appreciate your support.

This project is critical to improving the welfare of animals in our community. Your donation could not have come at a better time and has helped us reach another milestone in working toward completion of this building. Your support will have a long-lasting impact far into the future as we will be able to improve the care and increase the number of our rescues.

How many pets did this grant help?

Our currently capacity is 20-30 cats. The new building will be able to house 50-60 cats.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Lucky, a large, gentle, short-haired black cat (first photo), was almost 11 years old. He’d been adopted through Bond County Humane Society in 2006 when he was a 10-week-old kitten. But then his human mom was moving in December 2015 and could not take Lucky with her. So he came back to BCHS’s cat shelter in hopes that we could find him a new home where he could just lie around again and run the house. His longtime mom told us that he was a very good cat, loved attention, never jumped up onto counters or got into anything he shouldn’t. Still, Lucky lived at our cat shelter for almost a year, hanging out on the laps of our office volunteers, napping and spending playtime hours down on the big floor and shelf perches in the community cat room while socializing volunteers occupied him with laser pointers, jingle balls, and dangling feathers.

Finally, during a February 2017 Saturday off-site adoption event at Petco in Fairview Heights, Illinois, BCHS approved a family interested in adopting Lucky and he went to a new permanent home in Granite City, Illinois. The family also adopted a young kitten – Raider (second photo) – from BCHS the same day!

Capital campaign funding sources like the Petfinder Foundation grant absolutely help ensure that more senior cats who’ve been adopted through Bond County Humane Society will have a place to return to if need be, and that there will be places for cats who for other reasons need temporary shelter while we find them permanent adoptive homes. Our old, dilapidated, and inefficient cat-shelter facility has been in extreme danger of having to close, whether we complete the new facility at our new campus in time to move operations there or not! Getting the financial resources to finish and equip the new shelter can save cat-rescue and community-pet programs in our area.

Adult and senior cats like Lucky may show best for potential adopters in quiet settings like a comfy room in the same building in which they live. Our old shelter does not have that but the new one will — a meet-and-greet room with overstuffed chairs, a throw rug, a cat tree, and more familiar reminders of the home he had for over nine years. Lucky got lucky with BCHS’s hard work, creativeness, and passion with which we have tried to make up for a lack of a truly suitable facility since our founding in 2003. And the Petfinder Foundation’s recent grant helps finally provide that new wonderful purpose-built state-of-the-art facility now!

Bond County Humane Society: Purina and Amazon Treats for the Holidays Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Provide treats to the dogs in care at the shelter

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Provided treats to dogs being cared for in our dog shelter. We are a small shelter, so treats are considered a luxury. They have been very useful with training the dogs in basic obedience and good manners.

How many pets did this grant help?

10

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Percy (first photo) is an almost 10-year-old terrier mix who was surrendered to the shelter because his owner lived in an apartment that allowed one dog. Between the owner and his girlfriend, they had two dogs, so Percy was surrendered for adoption. He is very sociable and playful but is overlooked by potential adopters because of his age. Meet Percy: https://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/34547968

Goldie (second photo) is a 6-year-old spitz mix who was rescued from Bond County Animal Control because her time had expired and she was at risk of being euthanized. She was found as a stray behind a local restaurant trying to get food from a dumpster. All of her teeth are so worn down that initially it was thought she did not have teeth. She was extremely thin and tested positive for heartworm disease. She just completed her heartworm treatment so now she is in her six-week rest and recovery phase. When she has completed that, we will start looking for a permanent, loving home for Goldie.

Mack (third photo) is a 4-5-month-old shepherd mix who was rescued from Bond County Animal Control to keep him from being euthanized. He was found wandering on his own. He is extremely smart, playful and affectionate. He has an adoption pending. Meet Mack: https://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/34778469