Reports From This Organization

Naperville Area Humane Society: COVID-19 Operation Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

These funds were able to cover the cost of spay surgeries for three dogs and one neuter surgery for a kitten.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant was able to help us to provide the needed spay/neuter surgeries to four pets, which enabled us to fast-track those animals into adoption. Our adoptions by appointment have successfully enabled us to adopt out animals during COVID.

How many pets did this grant help?

4

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Stella (fourth photo) arrived to NAHS during COVID from a rescue transport that came from Arkansas. Stella was on death row and about to be euthanized if she was not transferred out. NAHS took in Stella right before her time was up, and thanks to this Petfinder Foundation grant, she was spayed and adopted within a week of arriving to us.

Here is an update from Stella’s new family: “We adopted Stella from NAHS and she has been the best pup. She loves the couch, piles of blankets, tennis balls, and her baby (a stuffed dog). She’s doing great walking on the leash and can’t wait to go to training once training facilities open again. She is incredibly smart and already knows how to sit, lie down, and give paw. Thank you for making the adoption process go smoothly. We just adore her.”

Naperville Area Humane Society: Sponsor a Pet Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

This grant went towards Beau’s parvo treatment.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped cover the costs of Beau’s treatment, which allowed him to make a full recovery.

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This money was used towards Beau’s treatment. Beau was parvo-positive upon arriving to NAHS, and he and his two littermates were all treated for parvo. Parvo treatment generally costs us around $500 per dog, so this grant was incredibly helpful in helping us cover the costs for Beau’s treatment. After his stay in the hospital, where he required around-the-clock care, he came back to NAHS and was put up for adoption. He was adopted soon thereafter and is now living the life he deserves with his new family. Thank you for helping Beau recover.

Naperville Area Humane Society: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant funds were used to purchase a variety of enrichment items for our shelter dogs. One of the newest forms of enrichment that we as a shelter are doing is canine nose-work. We have wonderful volunteers, one of whom is a trainer at a nearby facility, who have donated time teaching nose-work seminars. We had the knowledge of the sport, but we were lacking the supplies to really utilize the sport in the shelter.

This grant allowed us to purchase nose-work kits and supplies so that we are now able to have shelter dogs participate in the nose-work sport. We also used some of the funding towards our new ball pits that we have in our outdoor play areas. All dogs seem to jump on board with this new enrichment area. Even the more reserved dogs all let their curiosity get the best of them and they spend copious amounts of time investigating the ball pit. A well-worth investment for the dogs — so thanks again!

Another major addition to our dog enrichment calendar included the purchase of fleece and rubber mats for snuffle mats. The material used to create these mats was purchased and then the children in our humane-education classes assemble the mats and hand them out to the shelter dogs. It is a wonderful project, and really gives the children a sense of fulfillment to see the joy the mats bring to the dogs. Lastly, the funding went to puzzle games and dog treats that are used daily and integrated in all the enrichment plans from the grant request.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant allowed our staff, volunteers, and humane-education students all to participate together to better the quality of life for our shelter dogs. We are so very fortunate to have had this grant awarded to our shelter, as it allowed us to improve daily enrichment for the shelter dogs. We work off a daily enrichment calendar that is updated regularly and provides the dogs with a variety of mental and physical stimulation. This was all made possible because of the Orvis Animal Care Grant; the funding has allowed us to improve our enrichment that we provide to the dogs. Everything purchased through this grant can be used multiple times and will continue to provide enrichment for shelter dogs for years to come.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant will help about 300 dogs/year and about 25 dogs/month.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This grant helped one of our longer-term residents, Jillian, who I am happy to report has been adopted. Jillian was beginning to experience kennel frustration, so it was imperative that our animal-care staff provided her with daily enrichment. In addition to walks and daily playtime, Jillian would eat each meal out of a puzzle. The puzzles were purchased with this funding as well, and continuous to help our dogs who are too smart for their own good. Jillian also loved snuffle-mat and nose-work time, two puzzle-like games that worked her brain. She also was a regular participant in the ball pit as well as a year-round Easter-egg hunt champion. We would hide plastic eggs filled with treats around the outdoor area that she would seek out and pop open. It was because of this regular enrichment that Jillian was able to remain here with a sense of stability until she found her forever home.

Naperville Area Humane Society: Cat Enrichment Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was used for a variety of supplies that help enrich the lives of our shelter cats while they wait for their forever homes. By purchasing supplies to make homemade enrichment items, we have been able to create so much more than if we were to buy each item pre-made. Also, the bubble machine that we purchased has provided enrichment for our adult-cat room (as well as the volunteers who use the machine during their visits!). We also ended up providing enrichment for our cats while making the enrichment items. Volunteers have been taking the supplies into the cat rooms and assembling the enrichment items in front of the cats. The cats have taken that as playtime and seem to quite enjoy having the company as well as the live entertainment of people who are making cat toys for them.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant allowed us to purchase supplies that we use for daily cat enrichment. Many of the supplies have also been used and integrated into our humane-education lessons. Children who come in for classes and camps have a day dedicated to cat enrichment, where they make a variety of enrichment items for our shelter cats. The children love to make a bulk number of items that we keep and provide for volunteers to use on their visits. After our Facebook post that thanked the Petfinder Foundation for this grant, we had a volunteer become so inspired to help grow our cat enrichment program that she donated a television to the adult-cat room. We stream the cat channel on YouTube on that TV for our cats’ part of each day. It is because of this grant announcement that we have been able to provide more than we set out to for daily cat enrichment.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant will help 400 cats per year and about 40 cats per month.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This grant has allowed us to purchase a cat fountain for our feline friends who really enjoy the water. We have one resident, Sim Sim, who has been here for a few months and loves water. The staff would periodically bring Sim Sim up to the lobby so he could drink from and play with the water in the bathroom sink. The first photo shows Sim Sim drinking from the sink, and now I am happy to report he will be enjoying his new cat fountain. Meet him: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/39995070

Naperville Area Humane Society: Build-A-Bear Youth Humane Education Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

This grant has been used to support the Naperville Area Humane Society’s (NAHS) growing humane-education program, which includes our Paws for Tales animal-assisted reading program, Homeschool Heroes, After-School Program, summer camp, spring break internship, one-day holiday camps, outreach presentations, birthday parties, and shelter tours.

Paws for Tales animal-assisted reading program provides schools with certified volunteer-dog team visits, which help children of all ages to feel more comfortable by reading aloud to a dog in a non-judgmental, supportive environment. The Paws for Tales program motivates children to improve their reading skills in a way that can be observed as early as the first reading session with the dog. However, the program goes much deeper. The human-animal bond is very powerful, as the dogs offer a wonderful combination of kindness, curiosity, and patience to the task of reading. Interaction with the dog, and his or her unconditional love and limitless patience, is an experience that cannot be described. Paws for Tales supplies the books that contain humane themes such as kindness, empathy, and compassion. This grant helps us certify additional teams and provide participating children with a bookmark and choice of a sticker or a coloring sheet from the dog at the conclusion of each Paws for Tales visit. This grant has also helped facilitate in the sustainability of a growing program, and helped Paws for Tales continue to expand into additional schools and reach more children who need confidence in their literacy skills.

Our Homeschool Heroes and After School Programs each have five unique sessions (each session has six classes) and run throughout the school year. Available to children ages 8-14, these two programs offer children hands-on opportunities to work with our shelter animals. Below are descriptions of the sessions that this grant allows us the opportunity to offer to children in our community

Session 1 – Videos: Children create videos of the adoptable animals that will be posted on our website for potential adopters to view.
Session 2 – Work at Naperville Area Humane Society: Children become honorary NAHS employees and learn what it’s like to have dogs and cats as your day-to-day co-workers.
Session 3 – Spread Holiday Cheer: Kids have the chance to spread some love and cheer to our homeless animals this holiday season by helping enrich their lives.
Session 4 – Enrichment: Children help create innovative ways to keep our animals busy and happy while they wait for their forever homes.
Session 5 – Videos Part 2: Kids join the shelter animals as they enjoy springtime and help capture their cutest moments to showcase in videos for potential adopters.

This grant also helped educate 113 children in all of our sold-out summer camps this year. We offer six different types of camp that allow children to be immersed in animal learning and fun. Each camp offers animal-related educational activities including games, crafts, guest speakers from other animal-related organizations, and animal interactions. Below is a description of each camp as well as our 2017 camp schedule:

Art with the Animals (4- and 5-year-olds): Art with the Animals incorporates fun animal-themed art projects with lessons about pet care and safety. Offered during the week of 6/7-6/9
Friends for Life (6- to 8-year-olds): Friends for Life focuses on pet care and learning about responsibility for animals. Special guests from our humane society as well as outside animal organizations will make each day a new adventure for the campers. Offered during the weeks of 7/17-7/21 & 7/31-8/4
Animal Neighbors (9- to 11-year-olds): Animal Neighbors incorporates visits from other animal organizations to educate children on the importance of compassion for all kinds of animals. Children will love learning about, and meeting, different kinds of animals while learning how each organization benefits animals in its own way. Offered during the weeks of 6/12-6/16 & 7/10-7/14
Dog’s Day Out (12- to 14-year-olds): Dog’s Day Out gives campers a chance to learn about NAHS as well as other animal-related organizations, and observe firsthand how the community cares for and rescues all kinds of creatures big and small. Offered during the week of 6/19-6/23
Jump for Joy (11- to 13-year-olds): Jump for Joy gives children the opportunity to enrich the lives of our shelter dogs with daily outings to our outdoor agility area. Offered during the week of 7/24-7/28
K9Manners (12- to 14-year-olds): K9 Manners teaches children positive-reinforcement training techniques and gives them the opportunity to work with our shelter dogs. At the conclusion of the camp, the children will have a strong sense of accomplishment knowing that they helped their dog partner get one step closer to achieving his or her Canine Good Citizen certificate. Offered during the week of 8/7-8/11

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped educate children of all ages through our Homeschool Heroes, After School Program educational shelter tours and birthday parties, and outreach presentations. Also, this grant helped certify new therapy-dog teams and aid in the growth of our Paws for Tales and Pawsitive Therapy animal-assisted therapy programs.

How many pets did this grant help?

Year-to-date, this grant has helped 8,664 children though the aforementioned humane-education programs. This number is expected to exceed 10,000 by year’s end.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

I would like to share a story about Lucky Boy, a dog we took in from a shelter transfer and the third dog to enter Project Pawsitive Future. Lucky Boy and I actually go way back. He was originally found in Arkansas, trapped in a bear trap, when he was around 6 months old. Lucky Boy ended up with a rescue group in Oklahoma, and that rescue group ended up reaching out to a shelter in Chicago to do his reconstructive surgery, as the damage was quite extensive. He then went there for the surgery, and at that time (five years ago), I was actually working in medical at that shelter in Chicago and was part of the medical team during his surgery and recovery.

Lucky Boy was a puppy when all that occurred, and needed a long-term foster home to heal. He ended up going to a foster home that had a smaller, older dog, and Lucky Boy wanted to play all the time, so trying to keep him calm and the dogs separate proved to be very difficult. It was for this reason that he ended up going back to his original rescuer in Oklahoma in foster.

Fast forward five years, after our Clear the Shelters event, NAHS had extra kennel space and was able to take a few adult dogs from the rescue group in Oklahoma that we work with. That is how Lucky Boy ended up at NAHS. I realized who he was, and after he had his behavior assessment I decided that he would be a perfect candidate for our Project Pawsitive Future Program. He entered the program and graduated from it with a Canine Good Citizen (CGC) certificate. He has since been adopted, and he and his adoptive family are current volunteers for our Paws for Tales animal-assisted reading program and Pawsitive Therapy (our pet-therapy program). I have attached a picture of Lucky Boy after he passed his CGC evaluation.