Reports From This Organization

Heart of Idaho Animal Sanctuary: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was used to buy an assortment of new dog toys and a heavy-duty tether-ball set for use in one of our outdoor play areas.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The items purchased are very helpful in keeping the dogs busy and entertained. As you can see from the pictures of Moose and the tetherball (bottom two photos), it helps them use up excess energy and get some exercise. The dogs also like toys for security, just as kids do. We often send them home with the dogs when they are adopted and so need to continually replenish the supply. It was very helpful to have you help with this expense.

How many pets did this grant help?

14 so far and more to come: We were able to buy 40 toys and the tetherball.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Scotty (first three photos) and Hansen (photos 4 through 7) were brought to us by a rescue group from Utah, where they were due to be euthanized the next day. Scotty is about 6 years old and probably no longer up to herding cattle full-time. He is a gentle dog who loves people and has decided his new squirrel toy will be his new companion. Hansen, who is about 1.5 years old, is a strong, high-energy dog who was enjoying chasing the rope toy and playing tug of war with it. He will probably like tetherball once we can get it away from Moose (one of our boarders). We don’t know much about Hansen’s story, but both he and Scotty are still looking for good homes and will make wonderful pets.

Meet Scotty here.
Meet Hansen here.

Heart of Idaho Animal Sanctuary: KONG Toy Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Kong donated a selection of dog toys for our shelter dogs to play with while they are waiting to be adopted. We let the dogs select one they like that they can play with outside or in their kennels. Periodically, we fill them with peanut butter for a treat.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We like Kong toys because they are very sturdy and the dogs can’t chew them up and don’t end up swallowing pieces. Many of them become attached to their toys and we like to send the toy home with them as a transitional object when the dogs are adopted. If we do that, then we need to replace the toys. This grant will keep us in Kongs for some time to come, freeing up that money for other things.

How many pets did this grant help?

Eight so far and more to come

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Apollo, a husky/German shepherd mix (first three photos), is still waiting to be adopted. He was surrendered by a family whose circumstances changed and they could no longer take care of him. He is very high-energy and is timid around people until he gets to know them. He was given first choice of the Kong toys and, as you can see in the pictures, once he made his choice, he was attached. He shows his toy to anyone who comes to the shelter. Meet Apollo here.

Grady (fourth and fifth photos) is still at the shelter but has some health problems resulting in incontinence that we are working with the local vet to address before putting him back up for adoption. In the meantime, he is enjoying his Kong bone.

Fava (sixth and seventh photos), who came to the shelter as a stray puppy, showed a clear preference for the traditional Kong toy. She has since been adopted.