Reports From This Organization

Routt County Humane Society: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Funds received were used for Lolo’s radiographs for $87 and to cover a portion of her TPLO surgery, $913. The total grant award was for $1,000.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant award assisted our small shelter with getting Lolo diagnostics and surgery for a cranial cruciate ligament rupture. This allowed Lolo to regain her mobility and decrease her pain. Feeling her best and with her full fun-loving personality on display, she was able to find her forever home in a timely manner. Veterinary care is our largest expense and your grant allowed us to offset some of the expense of her care; therefore, we had funds available to help more animals.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

A wiggly, playful and energetic 4-year-old, 50-lb. pittie mix, Lolo arrived at Routt County Humane Society as a stray in January 2019. Upon examination, it was determined that she had a cranial cruciate ligament rupture (similar to an ACL rupture in humans) and required a triple pelvic osteotomy surgery to repair it and give her the quality of life she deserved. Lolo’s surgery was performed on Feb. 22 by the only board-certified surgeon in our valley.

Lolo was kept comfortable with restricted activity and lots of love and after her surgery she stayed at the shelter for recovery (a 16-week period) before being cleared to find her forever home. Her recovery included kennel rest, passive range-of-motion exercises and, after eight weeks, radiographs to check healing and then slowly increase the length of her exercises and walks.

Lolo was adopted into her forever home in early June 2019! She’s sweet, goofy and so excited to have found her forever home. Lolo will go on daily walks carrying her favorite toys and receive lots of love from her family!

Grand County Animal Shelter: Dogs Playing for Life Mentorship Grant (Invitation Only) Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant money was used for me to participate in a Dogs Playing for Life mentorship at the Longmont Humane Society.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped me learn how to utilize playgroups. We have the area, but we have never implemented this program. I am looking forward to showing my volunteers and staff how the program works. We have only one dog at the shelter at this time, so we are not able to do any group play yet.

How many pets did this grant help?

Hopefully all the dogs that come to our shelter

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This will help all of our dogs at the shelter so they can interact while here. Keeping them busy and their minds stimulated will tire them out. The staff and our volunteers will get to learn more of each dog’s personality as we see them interact with other dogs. And we will have a better understanding of where to place him/her — a quiet home, an active home, etc.

Routt County Humane Society: Dogs Playing for Life Mentorship Grant (Invitation Only) Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Dogs Playing for Life mentorship training

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Since we have implemented playgroups in our shelter, this program has helped decrease stress and anxiety levels in our dogs. It has provided valuable insight into how dogs interact with one another, allowing staff to find better adoption placements. This helps us better inform people as to the dog’s natural play style so that adopters can be aware of it and don’t mistake play for aggression. Playgroups also allow us to better assess each animal’s dog/dog behavior.

How many pets did this grant help?

35 since August 1, 2018 — the start of the program

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This program has significantly helped one of our long-term residents, Kirby. Kirby came to us as a transfer from a rural shelter. He was adopted out and returned a while later due to his reactivity towards vehicles. Kirby has been in training during his stay with us and we are pleased with his progress and the role playgroups have played in it. The ability to socialize and interact with other dogs has given him an outlet to decrease stress and satisfy his social needs. Kirby gets along with most dogs and enjoys active play sessions. We have utilized playgroups after training sessions to help him retain what he has just learned. We have noticed that this is particularly helpful in Kirby’s case. Staff have noticed that regular play sessions with different playmates has reduced Kirby’s stress and increased his focus during training sessions. Meet him: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/41100493

Routt County Humane Society: Purina New Year, New Home Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant funds were used to support a St. Patrick’s Day 50%-off adoption-fee special for cats. Two more such events are planned for July 4th and mid-August. We also placed two barns cats with this grant under our semi-feral cat relocation program.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant allowed us to open up space in the cat rooms at the shelter in the spring to accommodate “kitten season.” The event also helped us place a pair of bonded feral cats on a ranch where they are serving as “green rodent control” in the barn.

How many pets did this grant help?

10

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

T-Bone, the black-and-white kitty in the first photo, was turned in to the RCHS animal shelter after joining a jogger on a trail through town. The cat was walking along the trail when a man jogged by. T-Bone joined him and ran along beside him for a couple of miles. After the run, the jogger brought the friendly, unaltered male cat to the shelter, where he was listed in the stray report. T-Bone was never claimed, so he was neutered, microchipped and put up for adoption. It took several months before he was adopted during the Petfinder Foundation-sponsored promotion. During his time at the shelter, he became a staff favorite. He was very personable, and learned to “fist-pump” with the shelter staff. T-Bone has now found his forever home, where he is thriving!

Routt County Humane Society: All-Star Dog Rescue Celebration Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

$2,500 in grant funding was received to support pre-adoption veterinary care for shelter dogs, including vaccinations and routine care by a veterinarian contracted to visit the shelter twice per week, spay/neuter surgery, external veterinary services and in-shelter dog training to remedy and prevent behavioral problems to improve adoptability and ensure that adoptions are successful.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The pre-adoption spay/neuter and veterinary care program is the heart and soul our organization. Routt County Humane Society is committed to providing unowned animals with the care they need to make them adoptable. So far, the grant funding from the All-Star Dog Rescue Celebration has helped us to find forever homes for 37 of the 43 dogs who came into our care between April 27, when we received the funds, until today, July 22, 2016. Nine of those dogs required spay/neuter surgeries prior to adoption and grant funds contributed to the pre-adoption care of all of them.

How many pets did this grant help?

43: All received routine care and training, and some extraordinary care.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Here are the stories of two dogs who received a great deal of help from the Petfinder Foundation grant: Marble (first photo) was transferred to the RCHS animal shelter from [an open-admission] shelter in Texas. She is a pit bull mix and came to us with her four puppies. Once she was in our care, we discovered that Marble was positive for heartworm, which is very rare in this part of the country. Her puppies, however, were negative. As soon as the puppies had been weaned, RCHS started Marble on the long and rather difficult treatment protocol to free her of heartworm, using grant funds to support the cost of treatment. Following a course of steroid treatment and Heartgard, she had her first injections at 60 days and was kept very quiet for a week. More injections were given at 90 days. At 120 days following the beginning of treatment, she will be tested to ensure that she no longer is infected with the parasite. Once clear, Marble will be spayed and will be adopted by the family where she is currently in foster care. All four puppies were adopted right away.

Gidget (second photo), a 6- or 7-year-old miniature poodle, was picked up (after several failed attempts) as a stray and brought to the RCHS shelter on May 2. She was extremely shy, thin and ill. It was determined that Gidget was diabetic and insulin treatment was started right away. But then she developed pneumonia, followed by a bladder infection. Gidget never spent the night at the veterinary hospital, however, because one of our shelter technicians took her home every night during her recovery. Just last week, after 10 weeks in our care and a lot of veterinary treatment provided through the All-Star Dog Rescue Celebration Grant, Gidget was adopted!