Reports From This Organization

Haven Humane Society: Purina New Year, New Home Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

An adoption incentive for cats over a year old so they could get adopted before the kittens took over the adoption center.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We had several older cats who had been at the adoption center for a long time or who had been adopted and returned. We knew once the kittens started filling the adoption center, these older cats would be passed up for kittens and would spend many more months living in cat kennels. This grant helped those cats get into homes before kitten season started.

How many pets did this grant help?

40

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Autumn was a Carr Fire evacuee. Her owner brought her to Haven Humane Society for temporary shelter when she was evacuated from her home. Her home had burned down and she never returned for Autumn. Autumn was adopted, but returned to the shelter after four months because she hid under the bed all the time and was frightened by the family’s energy. Thurman was also adopted and returned. Thurman had been caught in a trap and brought to Haven Humane Society. Our staff worked with shy Thurman for a month and he became a friendly, loving cat. He was adopted, but was later returned for being aggressive. Thanks to this grant, Autumn and Thurman got a second chance — together! The Price family adopted both of them in May and they are living happily ever after.

Haven Humane Society: WAHL Grooming Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The Wahl shampoo was used to bathe shelter dogs and kittens.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

People often donate used grooming supplies to us and many times we have to throw them away because of the quality or age of the products. The Wahl shampoo was a nice gift to our groomers for our shelter animals because it is good quality, smells good, and is from a reputable source.

How many pets did this grant help?

It will take us quit a while to use all the product since our volunteer groomers come in only once a week. But I am figuring we will bathe around 200 dogs and two dozen flea-infested kittens with this grant.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We have 25 Sheperdoodles that are in protective custody. They were seized in a neglect case and have been in our shelter for many months. They are unsocialized and not housetrained. Our volunteer groomers come in each Thursday. It takes them eight hours to clip and bathe two of these large furry dogs. They have been at this for months and groomed the last of the 25 dogs just last week. When the Wahl shampoo arrived, the groomers started using it on these and other dogs. They love the way it smells.

Haven Humane Society: Disaster Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Medical care for cats rescued in the Clover Fire. Cats were burned and owners had not been identified when they came into our care. We treated them and found foster homes for those who were never reunited with their owners.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It paid a significant portion of the medical costs for the cats’ pain medication, bandages, subcutaneous fluids, antibiotics, and burn cream during their treatment.

How many pets did this grant help?

Eight cats

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Our Animal Control Officers were out in the burned area looking for animals that had survived the fire. Officer Mitchell came upon a residence that was burned to the ground; nothing was standing. He saw a small pond surrounded by boulders on the property and went to check for animals. About 10 cats were hiding under the boulders. He captured three of them; the rest ran from him. He loaded them into his vehicle and brought them to our veterinary clinic. The orange cat was severely burned on his face, paws and tail. The clinic staff named him Burney. Burney’s injuries were so extensive, they were beyond what we could treat on a long-term basis at our Spay/Neuter Clinic. We transported Burney to VCA Animal Hospital, where he could get more extensive treatment. One of their veterinarians fell in love with Burney. Since she couldn’t adopt him herself, she made a pledge to find him a forever home and to offer Burney free medical care for the rest of his life.