Reports From This Organization

Valley Humane Society: Sponsor a Pet Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The funds were used to provide food and routine medical treatments and cover the cost of care for Dede during her stay.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant enabled us to provide Dede with top-notch, individualized care until a loving adoptive family could be found.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Five-year-old Dede was picked up as a stray, wandering the streets. But other than some scabbing on her back near her tail, she was friendly and healthy. After being transferred to Valley Humane Society, Dede quickly found her forever family, who immediately set about renaming the tiny schnauzer mix. They tell us, “Family members put out many names for Dede, but the final decision was Sophie! Sophie had no difficulty fitting in. She is a very friendly dog and greets all visitors as new friends!” Sophie usually hangs out with her new guardian, but often sits on top of the couch looking out the window. When she needs a nap, she sleeps on a pillow on the couch. Sophie has many stuffed toys that she enjoys tossing around, and goes on a fast-paced walk with her guardian every morning. She sleeps cuddled up next to her on the bed, and likes to lie out on the deck in the sun. They add, “Thank you so much for making Sophie available for adoption!”

Valley Humane Society: Senior Pet Adoption Grants Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We used the money to encourage the adoption of Monet, a 7-year-old, FIV+ cat who had undergone a tail amputation and developed a urinary drip. Her adoption fee was waived, a special litter box and cat tree were purchased for her to take home, and a pet store gift card was given to her adopter to assist with her prescription diet and other needs for two to three years.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

With the “total package” to support Monet’s success in the home, Valley Humane Society was able to run a special promotion to bring awareness to Monet’s situation, seeking an adopter willing to accommodate her special needs. Not only did Monet find her forever home, but her media coverage brought attention to the other animals awaiting adoption.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Just days after we sent out a press release detailing Monet’s special situation (she was a tailless, FIV-positive senior kitty with an occasional urine drip), a local family who already had an FIV+ cat just happened to decide that they wanted another feline companion. Valley Humane Society was the only group in the area with a special-needs cat. They came to visit and (of course) fell in love with Monet and took her home. They weren’t remotely fazed by her challenges, and were completely willing to adapt to meet Monet’s needs. In their adoption photo, you can see on their faces that everyone is thrilled — and Monet looks as if she has claimed them for her own! Coincidentally, Monet was the 600th adoption of the year for Valley Humane Society. She had been in residence since January, so it definitely made for a joyous year-end celebration.

Monet’s new family has since shared that she’s captured all of their hearts. She loves running around first thing in the morning, and has claimed a number of lounging spots around the house. She and her new kitty sibling are amicably sorting out the details of their new relationship. They are managing her needs easily by layering her favorite sleeping areas and doing a couple extra loads of laundry each week. They also invested in some custom waterproof pads for their furniture. “Her weakness is in the cheek/chin area,” they wrote recently. “Scratch her there and she will love you forever.”

Thank you so much to the Petfinder Foundation for your support in helping Monet find her forever home! She represents those animals whom people sometimes see as a “lost cause,” but like so many of them, she had a lot of love left to give. Being able to share her story, and particularly her adoption, helps people understand that special needs can be managed too — because they can see that others are managing it.

Valley Humane Society: Cat Enrichment Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We purchased Kuranda cat towers, a variety of wands and cat toys, and in-kennel cat scratchers, per our budget attachment.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

These items helped to relieve stress and enrich the lives of cats and kittens during their stay at our adoption facility. Being able to replace carpeted-style cat towers with the more easily sanitized, plastic Kuranda beds will also help reduce transmission of bacteria.

How many pets did this grant help?

140 and counting

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

At nearly 5 years old, Maureen (first two photos) has lived most of her life in a home environment. She is not a big fan of the shelter, nor of the other kitties who populate it, perhaps because this isn’t Maureen’s first experience in shelter care. When she was just a few months old, Maureen was surrendered to Valley Humane Society with four littermates. Just one month later, she was on her way home in the loving arms of an adopter. She spent the next four years safe and loved and well cared-for, until the family’s circumstances required a move out of state that forced them to part with Maureen. They thought they had a new home lined up for her, but the day before they were to leave town, it fell through.

Distraught, they contacted Valley Humane Society. We always try to take back animals that have been adopted from us, but in Maureen’s case the notice was just too short; we didn’t have the space. With no other choice, they took her to the county facility. Fortunately, Valley Humane Society works closely with our local rescue partners, and we were able to arrange for Maureen to return to our adoption center within a few days.

Of course, an adoption center is not a home, and after all that, Maureen was stressed out. We know that stress can significantly affect a cat’s personality and negatively impact their interactions with adopters and team members. Thanks to the Petfinder Foundation Cat Enrichment grant, Maureen received her own private, in-kennel scratch pad, which she has made great use of! Being able to scratch out her anxiety has helped to soothe Maureen, and she uses it regularly. She is still looking for her forever home, but we are confident she will find it soon! Meet her: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/42106092

The third and fourth photos show other cats enjoying the items acquired thanks to the grant: Jasper toy testing (third photo) and Arctic and Denver on a Kuranda bed (fourth photo).

Valley Humane Society: Sponsor a Pet Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We used these funds to provide training and behavior assessments for Verdant.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Verdant received several training sessions.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Verdant displayed aggression toward other dogs. This money was used toward training sessions to assess Verdant’s behavior and provide training to alleviate it. Verdant is just under 2 years old and a retriever/Lab mix. Inspired by her name, Verdant dreams of running over lush, green rolling hills. She is an athletic young girl who loves her daily exercise and visiting with people.

Valley Humane Society: Sponsor a Pet Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Valley Humane Society used the donation to fund the care of Cheerio and other cats and dogs, including food, medical supplies, and veterinary care.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant provided Valley Humane Society with the necessary resources to care for the dogs and cats in our care. In 2015, we increased the number of animals we rescued and adopted by 40% over the previous year.

How many pets did this grant help?

1-2

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Cheerio was just a young kitten when she was found as a stray and taken by Animal Control to a large municipal animal shelter. Since young kittens require more time and attention than such shelters are able to provide, Valley Humane Society brought Cheerio into our adoption program. After spending some time in foster care awaiting her spay surgery, Cheerio became available for adoption and went to her forever home within the week!

Valley Humane Society: Purina and Amazon Treats for the Holidays Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Treats were distributed to animals in the facility and foster care.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Cats are housed in a communal living environment at the VHS facility. Each cat has its own kennel or room (unless it’s part of bonded pair) but they are exposed to the other cats throughout the day. This environment, while appealing to visitors, is stressful for the cats. Treats are used as motivators to get cats in and out of their kennels and in and out of the outdoor cat run. We can also use treats to coax cats out to meet visitors and keep everyone safe and avoid scruffing the cats. Treats were also sent home with several 3-month-old kittens who needed socialization to become adoptable companion animals.

How many pets did this grant help?

39

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

VHS recently adopted out a cat who originally arrived on March 26, 2013. She was adopted on Feb. 25, 2014, but returned on Nov. 18, 2014. Zuzu was unhappy with other cats, and the shelter environment was very stressful. Luckily, treats were a great motivator for Zuzu to safely move her in and out of her kennel. She was adopted to a new family on Feb. 12, 2016, and is now extremely content and happy in her own forever home.

Valley Humane Society: Purina and Amazon Treats for the Holidays Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The dog treats were used for our dogs residing at our facility and also dogs in foster homes. In February and March, we brought in 49 dogs. Treats are used to coax dogs on walks, reward them for basic training achievements and increase their socialization in a family environment.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The dogs residing at our facility are walked five times per day. Treats are good motivators to take them on walks and get them in and out of their individual kennels.

How many pets did this grant help?

49

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

On March 16, 2016, VHS brought in a 2-year-old male Dalmatian from Stockton Animal Services. The dog, called Darby, had been found as a stray in the Stockton area, not neutered and very unsure of his surroundings. Once under our care, he was neutered and treated for giardia and an upper respiratory infection. He was put on several medications, including pain relief after the neuter surgery, and obviously was uncomfortable and not feeling well. He was hesitant to go on walks and nervous when loud trucks or motorcycles passed by. Treats were a key motivator to get Darby out in the sun to stretch his legs and get some exercise. Volunteers kept treats in their pockets to keep him moving as he often stopped in the middle of the sidewalk and wouldn’t budge for long stretches of time.

On March 25, Darby was adopted to a local family with another male Dalmatian and they are committed to working on his behavior and helping him gain confidence that he is loved in his new forever home.

Valley Humane Society: Sponsor a Pet Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

This money helped defray the costs of feeding and caring for rescued dog Cody and cat Matt.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It helped pay for food, medical treatment and supplies for rescued dogs and cats.

How many pets did this grant help?

2 or more

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Matt was found abandoned, starving, and covered in fleas, so dreadlocked his fur had to be shorn. It took two weeks to get him purring again. Valley Humane Society took him in from one of our partner veterinarians who had found him as a stray. Originally believed to be around 8 years old, it was later decided he was around twice that age. Still, we felt he might find a home! Unfortunately, Matt never did leave our care. After a short time, Matt was diagnosed with colon cancer; we are grateful to have been there at the end of his life to care for him, keep him safe and show him he was loved. He was an amazingly sweet and gentle orange tabby and we miss him to this day.

Cody had been adopted. From his Petfinder profile: “This little ball of energy is ready for adventure. Cody’s a pretty smart little dude who will benefit greatly from training. He’s eager and attentive – which is the perfect setup for learning new things. Keeping him busy and active will suit him just fine. He’s adjusted nicely to his current environment and has settled down since he first arrived. But he enjoys his play time and will thrive in an active household that teaches him what’s expected of him. He walks nicely on a leash and has been socialized with kids. Cody will require regular grooming.”

Valley Humane Society: Sponsor a Pet Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The donation went to fund our animal care expenses. Cordelia was a cat in our care at that time.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Funds are needed to feed, provide litter and other supplies, and maintain medical care for our canine and feline charges.

How many pets did this grant help?

One or more

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Cordelia was a 7- or 8-year-old black cat who had been surrendered at the local county shelter when her elderly guardian moved into assisted living. She had run out of time on her hold period when Valley Humane Society pulled her out. She was on the chubby side, and had a lot of dandruff as she couldn’t groom herself well. Being a black cat as well as a senior kitty made it harder for her to find another forever home, yet she was such a loving girl! Her adopter was another senior lady, and it was like Cordelia chose her.