Reports From This Organization

Cochise Canine Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

To help provide surgery for Madeline, an 8-year-old pug who was hit by a car and severely injured. She has had two surgeries (front leg and hernia) and will be having her third (hip and rear-leg) surgery soon.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The generous Emergency Medical Grant we received from the Petfinder Foundation enabled us to accept another needy, seriously injured animal facing euthanasia into our program.

How many pets did this grant help?

one

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Madeline, an 8- to 10-year-old little pug dog, was found hit by a car. She was taken to the Pinal (Casa Grande) pound, which has no veterinary care on-site. Madeline’s front leg was hanging, completely dislocated, and she had a huge inguinal (abdominal) hernia from the impact of the car. Her rear leg and hip also had been damaged. She languished in pain for several days. Thanks to the Petfinder Foundation’s Emergency Medical Grant, Cochise Canine Rescue was able to pull Madeline, who went to our primary foster home in Phoenix.

Her rear leg and hip will require surgery as soon as her first surgeries have fully healed. We hope the surgery will be completed in September. The total costs for these surgeries will be approximately $3,500.

As soon as Madeline is fully healed, we will be able to post her on Petfinder and find her an ideal loving home!

Cochise Canine Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Mini, a dog with stage-four mammary cancer, was taken in from the Tucson pound on June 22, 2018. She has been getting medical care from our local veterinarian at All Creatures in Benson, AZ, and from Integrative Veterinary Onocology in Phoenix. Funds were used for medical care, chemotherapy, blood work and other medications needed to keep Mini comfortable and reasonably healthy.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This week is eight months since we acquired Mini. During the first weeks we had her, she almost passed away twice. No one expected her to live as long as she has and do as well as she is doing. Mini is seen by one of her vets at least once a month for blood workups. Mini is currently on these medications: Gabepentin and tramadol for discomfort, prednisone as an antiinflamatory and to slow tumor growth, and her chemo drug every other day. Mini also takes ondansetron and metronidazol to help her gut cope with the chemo. She gets a round of antibiotics (Clavamox) for 10 days every 6-8 weeks to keep from getting infections. Mini also gets a selection of important vitamin and mineral supplements daily to boost her immune system. She is doing remarkably well and we are all hoping Mini has many more months of comfortable life ahead of her!

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

CCR picked Mini up from Pima on Friday, the 22nd of June. When putting her in the crate in the van to take her home, Mini rolled onto her side and I was horrified by the wound on her chest and under her left arm. There was a large, gaping and necrotic hole that appeared to have eaten into her underlying muscle. It was constantly oozing and draining and so large you could easily stick an entire finger into it. Several of her mammary glands were large and hard. While Pima’s medical staff did blood work and X-rays on this very sick little girl, the antibiotics they gave her had not stopped the infection raging through her body. I drove back to Tucson the next day after speaking to one of Pima’s vets and discovering Mini had not been sent home with the correct medications. After viewing the photos of her wound, surgery was moved up to Thursday morning.

Shortly before noon on Thursday, I received a call: Mini’s surgery was stopped after the removal of the major mass and lymph nodes on the left side and they had closed her up. Mini had almost died! Her temperature had dropped from a normal range of 101-102 to 92.6 degrees. She was in shock. We all feared that she was dying.

Mini was placed on a heating pad and covered with a blanket. A vet tech sat with her for the next few hours. At around 98 degrees, she woke up. Slowly her temperature crept back up to 100.8. They took her off the heating pad. Within a few hours she was up on her feet and by 4 p.m. she was drinking a little water on her own.

The next day, Friday, she began to eat. Pima kept her on strong pain medications and IV fluids. I picked up Mini noon Saturday. She was so happy to see me! Mini has been on a rocky road since surgery. On July 2, we received the pathology report: The cancer has spread to her lymph nodes. She will require more surgery, followed by treatments by an oncologist. Right now her lungs sound clear and her liver and kidney functions (as per her blood work) are doing well too. Mini is a spunky little fighter so I can only hope for the best!

Cochise Canine Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Medical care for Mini, a dog with cancer. I will list the past two months’ medical expenditures, as well as upcoming expenditures committed to before Oct. 20, 2018. The drugs Mini is taking are a daily “cocktail”: two drugs in the a.m., one drug in the p.m., plus supplements midday, all given with small home-cooked high-protein, low-carb meals.

Morning: Cyclophosphamide – a very low-dose compounded daily chemo drug. This is given with furosemide, also compounded, which helps prevent bladder cysts that can be caused by the chemo
Midday: Vitamin E oil, fish oil, curcumin, probiotics, CBD oil
Evening: Piroxicam – compounded formula. Piroxicam is a strong NSAID with the additional benefit of helping reduce tumors. Piroxicam is often used as a stand-alone drug when an animal cannot tolerate chemo drugs. We are fortunate in that Mini has been on the medications for a month and is tolerating them perfectly.

Mini is scheduled to see Dr. Hershey, her oncologist at IVO, in Phoenix again on Oct. 15 for an ultrasound and X-rays, as well as re-measurement of the tumors to document changes.
Medical costs to date:
AZ Diagnostic Laboratory – pathology: $145.00
All Creatures Veterinary Services: $276.44 (this is only what was not covered under a $750 grant from Paws for Life, which has been totally used)
IVO – Dr. Hershey – first visit: $148.00
Arizona Animal Hospital: $200.00
Diamondback Drugs – compounded medication: $157.85
Reorder of compounded medications: $157.85
Revisit, Dr. Hershey, including ultrasound and X-rays: $318.67
Total medical expenditures: $1561.66

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It enabled Mini to have the ongoing medical care, medicines and testing she requires. As a result, she is doing very well and looking forward to a long time with a wonderful quality of life!

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Mini is doing incredibly well. Three months ago, when Mini first arrived at CCR, she almost died twice: once during her first surgery and once several days later due to systemic sepsis caused by her open, untended, ulcerated mammary tumor. (See photos before and after surgery.) Today, Mini’s bloodwork has gone from extremely anemic and an off-the-charts white count to what would be seen in a dog without cancer, i.e. “normal ranges.”

Unfortunately, due to her long-term neglect by her previous “caregivers,” she is in stage-four cancer — the cancer has spread to several lymph nodes. Given that reality, she is on a daily three-drug protocol which may buy her several years of health and comfort. She will be seeing her local veterinarian monthly for bloodwork sent to the oncologist for review, as well as visits to Dr. Hershey at IVO every two months. Both Dr. Hershey and Dr. Knoblich (the local vet) agree that Mini has at least two years of health and potentially as long as 4-5 years. Given that she is already 11 years old, this will indeed make her an elderly little dog.

Mini has an amazing quality of life. She has integrated herself into the little pack of senior and handicapped dogs. She is active and playful, and if you didn’t know differently, you would think she was a normal, healthy dog. Mini is not up for adoption at this time since she will need several years of ongoing, expensive medical care.

Cochise Canine Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Medical care/surgeries for Bella (hernia repair and spay) and Buddy (leg amputation.) Of the $693, $482.73 went to paying for Bella’s surgery, with the remaining $210.27 going toward Buddy’s leg amputation.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant enabled us to move forward with two surgeries which were immediately needed, and alleviate the suffering for these two animals.

How many pets did this grant help?

two

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Due to their need for extreme medical care, neither dog will be listed for adoption until they are fully healed. Bella (first photo) arrived in December 2016 from the euthanasia list at Maricopa Animal Control. Her two hernias were so severe that it was difficult to find a surgeon in southern Arizona willing to operate on her. We found a surgeon, Dr. Brett Cordes, in north Scottsdale, who performed the first of her surgeries in February 2017. They were unable, at that time, to spay her due to the invasiveness of the original surgery. They did remove her spleen, however, as it was compromised by the hernia. At that time, he let us know that she would eventually need a second surgery to further repair the hernias. On Jan. 2, 2018, she was brought in for an ultrasound to see what needed to be done. It was discovered that during her healing time, her ovaries had moved into the rent caused by the smaller, remaining hernia. On Jan. 23, she was again brought up to Dr. Cordes’ offices at Arizona Animal Hospital, where the second surgery was performed. Although her muscle walls are still more fragile than we would have liked, it is hoped that this will be the last of her needed surgeries.

Buddy’s (fourth photo) left front leg had been broken MANY months ago … but he was never taken to a veterinarian to have the leg splinted. As a result, Buddy has lost use of the misaligned leg. To make matters even worse, just a few days before Christmas, his owners (he is on their sofa in the picture)
dumped this 2-year-old Chihuahua at Pinal pound. While many other little dogs were adopted or rescued, Buddy languished in fear and discomfort over the holidays. Although Cochise Canine really had a “full house,” we just could not, in good conscience, allow this little boy to suffer any longer!

Cochise Canine Rescue: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We purchased new dog beds, a variety of toys for small to XL dogs, and a few warm sweaters for smaller dogs who did not have any. Many of our beds had been worn out or torn up. We found a selection of comfortable beds and three sweaters/coats for the smaller dogs at Ross Dress for Less, which has a good discounted pet section. For the larger dogs, we found some orthopedic foam beds for under $20 each at Coscto. We purchased four of them for less than $100! These particular beds are for dogs with arthritis or amputations. We also found great toys both at Costco and online, ranging from great prices for Nylabones at Costco to rope toys of various types and sizes through Amazon and eBay. Now all the dogs have comfortable and clean beds, warm winter wear, and lots of toys to play with!!

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We have 31 dogs on-site, mostly senior and special-needs animals — whether blind, toothless, three-legged or suffering with chronic illnesses such as cancer or valley fever. Our dogs now have enough beds, winter wear and toys to play with thanks to this Orvis grant!!

How many pets did this grant help?

31 dogs

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Henry (first photo) is a double-merle (“lethal white”) cattle dog. He blind in his right eye and, according to the veterinarians at Eye Care for Animals in Tucson, has approximately 10% vision in his left — but will go completely blind as he gets older. Nonetheless, as a 2-year-old, he is high-activity and playful. This grant bought Henry new toys. Rope toys are his absolute favorites, but he enjoys stuffed squeaky toys as well! Henry has been on Petfinder for quite a while with his very best friend, Adi, a 3-year-old, three-legged cattle dog. They play tug-of-war together with their new toys. We are hoping they will find a home together, as they are incredibly bonded. Here is a brief video of Henry playing with a new rope toy: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4PIO7vYSwhs. The second photo shows Adi shortly after her leg amputation; you can see WHY we needed some new beds!

Meet Henry: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/38579585

Cochise Canine Rescue: All-Star Dog Rescue Celebration Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Medical care for the senior and special-needs dogs in our care. One of our handicapped dogs, Yassi, needed eye enucleation due to glaucoma in January 2016. In March, an older dog, Sarge, required surgery.

We further used the funds for ongoing blood work on several dogs with valley fever plus their medications. I am pleased to report that by mid-year, all but one of the four dogs with VF had gone into remission or recovered.

In February, our dog Billy, who is living with cancer, had blood work and x-rays to see whether the cancer, osteosarcoma, had spread. To date — 17 months after his initial leg amputation — Billy is doing very well with no recurrence.

We have a number of senior dogs with arthritis and age-related issues living on anti-inflamatory and pain-relieving medications. The grant helped provide these medications to the animals in our care.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We have been able to provide the ongoing medical treatment that our senior and special-needs animals require. This grant was literally a lifesaver and has enabled CCR to ensure the dogs are comfortable and healthy.

How many pets did this grant help?

Close to a dozen dogs, either through direct veterinary care or the purchase of medications they needed.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Yassi arrived at Cochise Canine Rescue from a northern Arizona Navajo reservation in 2014. She was 2-3 years old, already blind and had rear-end weakness, possibly due to distemper as a pup. Early in 2015 we began noticing that her eyes were beginning to “bulge” — a sign of possible glaucoma. We took Yassi to our veteriarian, Dr. Heist at Rincon Vista in Tucson, who measured the eye pressure with a special device. The pressure was elevated significantly, denoting glaucoma. Although enucleation is a painful surgery, allowing the glaucoma to progress is also very painful, so we had her eye removed. Since Yassi was already blind, she adjusted rapidly, and once she’d healed from the surgery she seemed to be happier and more comfortable! (Attached are pictures before and after surgery.)

Cochise Canine Rescue: All-Star Dog Rescue Celebration Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Medical care

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Cochise Canine primarily takes in dogs with medical issues such as valley fever, handicapped dogs needing surgery or after-surgery support, and seniors. During the last 12 months we have had four dogs treated for valley fever (only one, Harry, is now still on medications!). We took in a blind dog, Charlie, with glaucoma who needed his eyes inculcated. We helped another dog, Triton, who had his rear leg amputated at the Maricopa County shelter after he came in having been hit by a car. After care and recovery, we found him a great forever home.

Since so many of our dogs are senior and/or have chronic medical conditions, thanks to your grant we were able to ensure that they were able to get the testing, medications and follow-up to give them the care and quality of life they deserve.

How many pets did this grant help?

12

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Triton arrived at Cochise Canine within weeks of having his left hind leg amputated at Maricopa Animal Shelter. He was having a difficult time adjusting to living with three legs so no one at the shelter wanted him and he was facing euthanasia. Shortly after his arrival it was discovered that he would need additional surgery for several untreated wounds, and when they were healed, he was neutered. The funds from the grant enabled us to provide the follow-up care Triton required. Within three or four months we were able to put Tri on Petfinder, as he was healthy as well as emotionally healed. A young couple in Tucson contacted us and met with Tri. They fell in love and adopted him both as a personal companion but also as a buddy for their husky-mix girl. Tri now has a safe and loving home. He has come a long way from the day we took him in!

Cochise Canine Rescue: P.L.A.Y. Pet Beds Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Products provided were pads to be used as dog beds.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Provided comfortable sleeping pads for a number of our resident dogs.

How many pets did this grant help?

12

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Charlie came to Cochise Canine Rescue a half year ago. He is a blind 6+-year-old Shepherd/Sharpei mix found running down a heavily trafficked street late at night, dragging a 20-lb. chain behind him — a chain wired to his neck! Taken to the Pinal County pound, he was never claimed by his owners and he was put on the euthanasia list. With the help of a Lulu’s Angel Fund (medical) grant, CCR took him. We found that he was not only blind but had painful, advanced glaucoma. His eyes were enucleated (removed) to relieve the pressure and eliminate the pain caused by the glaucoma. Since he was already blind, once healed, Charlie became so much more comfortable and content. Charlie is looking for his forever home, but needs to be an only dog. We know he must have been attacked while blind and chained up alone, as he is terribly afraid when other dogs come near him.

Charlie loves people, pets, cuddles and treats — things he obviously lacked in his previous life. He spends much of his time in our office where, if not pressing up against us for head-skritches, he often sleeps in his always-open pen on his comfortable P.L.A.Y pad — although he does bring in his “blankie” and his toys to cuddle with. Meet Charlie: https://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/33226715