Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

Kokomo Humane Society: Dogs Playing for Life Mentorship Grant (Invitation Only)
What was the money or product used for?

To attend a Dogs Playing for Life mentorship

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped us get a larger portion of our dog population out to playgroup or a social session at least every other day. This allows us to place dogs in homes that are more compatible with them, leading to fewer returned pets.

How many pets did this grant help?

50-75

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

The first dog this grant helped is Gator. Gator is a 3-year-old Cane Corso Mastiff mix. He was a returned adoption who was said to have attacked another dog while trying to attack a construction worker through a fence. We worked with Gator extensively on his barrier reactivity, did social sessions with him and a small female dog, and socialized him with as many human males as possible. Gator was eventually adopted out to a military man who had owned several extra-large dogs before. Gator had worked through his barrier reactivity to humans and dogs and loves his little 40-lb. friend, even though she is about 100 lbs. lighter than him!

The next dog is Moonie, a 2-year-old Coonhound mix. Moonie originally came to us as a stray and then was returned to us due to his ability to escape from anything. He started off wearing a muzzle in playgroups because he seemed to love playing with dogs, but also loved biting them. Moonie would easily tip over and try to fight the other dogs. He wore the muzzle to group and worked through this with many corrections from us humans and the dogs. After he’d been with us for around three months, we took off the muzzle and he did fabulous! He was even considered for an assessor dog a couple times. Moonie was adopted out about two weeks after we took the muzzle off and went to a home with a small dog!

Dexter is the third dog this grant has helped. Dexter was adopted out as a puppy and then eight months later was found as a stray a couple of counties over from where he was adopted to. He was extremely scared of people and would snarl and growl any time someone got near him. He went to playgroup through the dedication and determination of our runners and we gained his trust. He was mostly handled by our playgroup staff and volunteers and was used as an assessor dog for several months. Now Dexter is adopted and lives with me, Marissa, the head of behavior and medical. We are working through his fear of strangers, as he will lunge at people if they approach unexpectedly. This grant allowed me to gain knowledge and resources to get him through his issues and on to becoming a well-rounded dog. Since he was adopted, we go to dog parks to help associate strangers with dogs, which he loves very much.

The Haley Graves Foundation: Dogs Playing for Life Mentorship Grant (Invitation Only)
What was the money or product used for?

Dogs Playing for Life mentorship program tuition

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We have successfully been able to help our dogs (some of them with behavioral issues) move on to successful adoptive homes.

How many pets did this grant help?

6

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Hali is a Lab/pit bull mix who was overly interested in small animals. Playing too rough, she accidentally killed a cat. Hali has been rehabilitated and successfully adopted into a home with cats.

Humane Society of Utah: Cat Enrichment
What was the money or product used for?

The generous $1,000 grant from the Petfinder Foundation was used to purchase items to stock our new enrichment room with, including cat toys, beds, and supplies to be used for cats who are awaiting adoption at our facility. The toys we purchased include items like target sticks, spinning balls, cardboard scratchers, catnip toys, Kong balls, teaser wands, and bed caves.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Enrichment improves our ability as a shelter to help with behavior and training issues while supporting the overall health of our animals. Enrichment also decreases stress in animals, which decreases the rate of illness. Our new enrichment room is a tremendous asset to the shelter, and having the necessary toys and supplies for the cats helps provide them with an environment where they are engaged and healthy, which ultimately increases their adoptability.

How many pets did this grant help?

With help from the Petfinder Foundation, we are able to offer enrichment opportunities to all the cats who enter our shelter. Over the next 12 months, we anticipate adopting out approximately 235 cats, and they will all benefit from the supplies and toys we purchased using the generous Petfinder Foundation grant.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

As a sassy 5-year-old cat, Elsie (first photo) served multiple bite quarantines during her stay because she only enjoys being pet on her terms. Once we introduced interactive toys and clicker training, she became a completely different cat. With the enrichment, we showed her ways to interact with people that still allowed her to be social but didn’t always involve petting. As training progressed, she became easier for staff and visitors to handle, and the clever girl even learned how to jump through a hoop. After 136 days at Utah Humane, she went to loving forever home.

Haven Humane Society: Purina New Year, New Home
What was the money or product used for?

An adoption incentive for cats over a year old so they could get adopted before the kittens took over the adoption center.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We had several older cats who had been at the adoption center for a long time or who had been adopted and returned. We knew once the kittens started filling the adoption center, these older cats would be passed up for kittens and would spend many more months living in cat kennels. This grant helped those cats get into homes before kitten season started.

How many pets did this grant help?

40

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Autumn was a Carr Fire evacuee. Her owner brought her to Haven Humane Society for temporary shelter when she was evacuated from her home. Her home had burned down and she never returned for Autumn. Autumn was adopted, but returned to the shelter after four months because she hid under the bed all the time and was frightened by the family’s energy. Thurman was also adopted and returned. Thurman had been caught in a trap and brought to Haven Humane Society. Our staff worked with shy Thurman for a month and he became a friendly, loving cat. He was adopted, but was later returned for being aggressive. Thanks to this grant, Autumn and Thurman got a second chance — together! The Price family adopted both of them in May and they are living happily ever after.

Animal Help Alliance: KONG Toy Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Kongs for our dogs in boarding

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The Kongs provided enrichment for our dogs in boarding to help alleviate boredom and stress.

How many pets did this grant help?

10

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Mika is a very active 2-year-old border collie/whippet mix. Being in boarding is very hard on her. Enrichment toys like Kongs help to keep her mind occupied. Mika needs a foster or adopter so she can get out of boarding. Meet Mika here.

American Eskimo Rescue of St. Louis: Senior Pet Adoption Grants
What was the money or product used for?

See below.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped us to get Lillian the medications and tests that she required in order for her to live a normal life not in pain.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

The money was used for Lillian, who was sick with gallbladder disease. She had an ultrasound and we found out she had a clogged gallbladder, so she could have been having some gallbladder attacks and thus was in pain. Therefore she needed medications and is still on Denamarin, which is helping her liver. She is also on Actigall, which keeps her gallbladder cleaned out. Since we were able to provide her with the needed medications, she is now able to live in her wonderful forever home. Lillian has a lot of energy and she just wants to be a dog.

Lillian is 13 years old now and was let go at the age of 12. Senior dogs are hard to get adopted, especially when they are sick! She is doing very well now and has a very loving, caring family. They stay in touch, too.

Angels of Assisi: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The funds granted to Angels of Assisi were used to provide medical treatment to Freddy. Upon arrival, Freddy needed fluids, antibiotics, and pain medications. His leg was severely matted and was amputated the next day.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped alleviate the financial burden that Freddy’s leg amputation was going to put upon the organization.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Animal Control brought a little pup in on March 18. He was able to walk and was all tail wags, but something was just not right. An awful smell wafted from him and filled our entire clinic, and his little legs were dense with matted fur.

After his sedation set in, the clippers came out and we discovered the cause of the smell: He had such horrific and extensive mats on his legs that they had literally almost severed his foot off. We attended to the mass infection immediately and shaved his other legs down along with the rest of him. Underneath the filth, we found a lovely little fellow whom we called Freddy Biscuit.

IV fluids, antibiotics, and pain medications were started immediately, and his leg had to be amputated the following day. Freddy stayed in our clinic for the following week to be kept under watch as he healed. During this time, Freddy found his forever home. His new dad fell head-over-heels in love with him.

Lab Lovers Rescue: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

Vet bills

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

As you know, our greatest expense is vet care. Ear infections, parasites, spay/neuter, etc., far outweigh the adoption fees. Sponsorships help pay the bills, and also bring more attention to a specific adoptable dog.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Pacino, now called Jamison, was considered unadoptable because he failed a stress test at the local shelter. After moving into a foster home and developing trust, he was adopted to a lovely woman.

Young-Williams Animal Center: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

We put the Petfinder Foundation’s gift toward the care of Mia, a sweet but scared 7-year-old female mixed breed who has been with us since October. Fortunately, a wonderful foster has been taking care of her, so she hasn’t had to spend all that time in the shelter environment, but Mia is ready for her forever home.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Pets like Mia who have to stay in the shelter for an extended period of time need a lot of extra care, enrichment, marketing, and more in order to give them the best shot at happily ever after. The Petfinder Foundation’s investment allows us to provide second chances and cover some of these extra costs.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Mia is a special girl who’s overcome a lot in the past couple of months. She doesn’t come off as the friendliest dog at first, but that’s just because she’s nervous and unsure of strangers (especially men). She needs an adopter who is understanding and will let her move at her own pace. But beneath her sassy and sometimes tough exterior is a sweet, loving dog who responds to patience, love, and toys — lots and LOTS of toys! Once you’ve gained her trust, she is an absolute Velcro dog — she won’t leave you alone, and wants ALL the pets, ALL the time!

I have no clue as to what mix of breeds she is, but she’s around 7 years old and the cutest little scruffamuffin! She’s around 45 lbs., but is quite chunky (she’s on a diet). She’s been spayed and vaccinated and is up-to-date on all vetting! Mia is still looking for her forever home. Meet Mia here.

Outcast Rescue: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

We put the $90 sent to Outcast Rescue towards the purchase of microchips for the dogs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Microchipping is an important part of our process. All chips are registered once implanted.

How many pets did this grant help?

9

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We microchipped one of the dogs we took in from New Jersey’s largest hoarding case. Spinner is just one of the dogs who was helped.