Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

St. Martin’s Animal Foundation: COVID-19 Operation Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The donation was used for our outreach program, Puppies Without Borders. We rescue battered puppies and street dogs from Mexico every week. We used the funding for vet care and cancer treatments.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It helped tremendously, especially for Stormy, who had just delivered puppies and had a huge tumor on her uterus. Without veterinary help, she and her puppies would have died.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant helped four dogs survive.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Stormy is a large Doberman mix who was wandering the streets of Tijuana, very pregnant and ready to deliver. Sadly, Stormy had a huge tumor that was infected and getting worse. Thanks to your grant, we were able to take her off the streets, start her with her chemotherapy, and have foster families care for her puppies. She is a gorgeous dog and Storm and her puppies are now thriving and in secure homes.

I Heart Dogs Rescue and Animal Haven: Senior Pet Adoption Grants
What was the money or product used for?

The money was used for a year’s worth of insulin and needles for a diabetic senior dog.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped a diabetic senior dog be more adoptable because a year’s worth of her necessary medication was paid for.

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Tiny is a senior miniature-pincher mix who spent 134 days in the rescue before finding her forever home. She was originally adopted shortly after she got to us from a shelter in Kentucky, but was returned after she was diagnosed diabetic. She LOVES everyone and had experience living in a home, but people were consistently deterred from adopting her because of her health and medical expenses.

I had personally worked with adopters Terry and Fran and had them meet numerous dogs, but they weren’t connecting with any of them. On a whim, we gave Tiny a shot with them (even though she was not much of what they’d said they wanted). It was love at first sight! Not only is she extremely loved and in a home, but the cost of her insulin and syringes are not a burden on her amazing adopters for a year.

The Heart of Rescue: COVID-19 Operation Grant
What was the money or product used for?

When we received the money, we were looking at a major medical procedure for one of our senior dogs named Cloud. He had developed glaucoma and the best course of action was to remove the eye for comfort and relief of pain. We applied the $250 grant towards his surgery to alleviate our day-to-day financial burden so we could continue to care for the additional dogs in our care.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Being able to apply the grant towards the surgery for Cloud allowed us to keep our finances available for the dogs in our care during the unpredictable COVID-19 situation.

How many pets did this grant help?

Ultimately it helped all of our resident pets at the time of receiving the grant, even though it was mainly used to get Cloud the surgery he needed.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Cloud came to us in September 2019. He was pulled from shelter with a lump on his neck and taken immediately to the vet. It was determined that he had an abscess caused by a snake bite. After receiving medical treatment, he was transported up to our rescue in Portland, OR. He was in foster care and developed an inflamed left eye. We sought treatment of the eye and it was determined that he had developed glaucoma in that eye. It was recommended that the eye be removed to alleviate the pain involved. The grant money allowed us to get Cloud the care he needed without creating too much of a financial hardship. Cloud has since been adopted to a wonderful family.

Pooch Savers Rescue: Purina Adoption Grant
What was the money or product used for?

We were able to use the 2020 Purina Spring into Adoption Grant to help get some of our senior dogs, who often get overlooked, adopted.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We were able to significantly reduce our adoption fees and because of that, three senior dogs, including one with SIGNIFICANT medical needs, were adopted. Every time a dog gets adopted, it frees up space for us to rescue another dog. Getting these seniors adopted into loving homes may not have happened if not for the grant. Thank you, Petfinder Foundation and Purina!

How many pets did this grant help?

3

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Austin and Mason (first photo), both 13 years old, were surrendered to our rescue in REALLY bad shape. They’d been neglected for years. In addition to being filthy, matted and covered in feces, their teeth were rotted and cracked. After getting them cleaned up and settled in, we immediately got them dentals and they both needed several teeth extracted. It took a while for them to recover, but once they did, they were adopted together into an incredible home (second photo).

Peanut (third photo) came from a hoarding situation and had also been severely neglected for many years. He was another one who was in bad shape when we got him. Filthy, matted, with teeth in awful shape and his nails so long that a couple were curled in a complete circle (fourth photo).

Even though he was only 10 years old, physically, he was about twice that. He had arthritis. He was incontinent, heartworm-positive and senile. We did what we could as far as basic vet care, but found he needed a more thorough exam, so we took him to a neurologist to see what, if anything, could be done to help him. Sadly, the neurologist found that, really, he was only a candidate for some medication to hopefully reduce his senility and any pain he might be in.

We listed Peanut on Petfinder and in his bio, we stated exactly what the neurologist said. We got inquiries, but the main turnoff was his incontinence, which was understandable, but still, he deserved a forever home just like any other dog.

Well … in walks this AMAZING couple into our lives. They’d seen Peanut on Petfinder, read about him and were not deterred. They lived four hours away but they were not deterred. They submitted an application, and they got approved.

We then spoke to them at length on the phone. We painted the most bleak picture we could because we certainly didn’t want them to drive four hours and not have a completely clear picture of Peanut and all his issues. They still were not deterred. They drove up to meet and possibly adopt Peanut and you can see in the fifth photo what we were met with when we arrived with Peanut to do the introduction.

I mean, have you EVER? They’d had masks made in a matter of like a day. Before they even came to Dallas to meet Peanut, they just knew he was the one for them. In addition to the masks, they had a ramp built so Peanut could easily get to the backyard and they bought a pool alarm, all with no prompting from us! Peanut has been in his new home for almost two weeks now, and they love him beyond measure. He will now live the rest of his life as it should’ve been all along: being pampered and treated with respect like the precious dog that he is.

The reduced adoption fees, which we were able to provide because of the 2020 Purina Spring into Adoption Grant and the Petfinder Foundation, allowed these precious senior dogs to find homes!

Priceless Puppy Rescue Corp.: Senior Pet Adoption Grants
What was the money or product used for?

The money received went directly to the sponsoring of Nooby’s medical care and waiving of her adoption donation for her future adopter! She has found her forever home and is doing so well.

Eye medication: $50 a month x 6 months = $300
Joint supplements: $50 a month x 6 months = $300
Pain management medication: $20 a month x 6 months = $120
Adoption fee = $150
Total needed for her sponsored fee = $870 (amount awarded was $750)

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant went directly to Nooby, who had her medical care and adoption fee sponsored by your organization.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Nooby girl received a lot of medical care while she was with us. She will need a lifetime of joint supplements, pain-management medication for some issues in her back legs, and eye medication for a double entropion eye surgery she received while in our care. We also sponsored her adoption fee so it could be waived for her future adopter, as many individuals do not want to adopt senior dogs. The funds went directly to her eye meds, joint and pain-management supplements, and her adoption donation.

She found an amazing forever home with a family who loves her dearly. She gets along amazingly with her new human sister.

Last Paw Rescue: KONG Toy Grant
What was the money or product used for?

We were awarded $279.80 in KONG products.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The KONG toys were distributed to our foster families. These foster families used the toys to engage our dogs. The toys have helped dogs who have separation anxiety by giving them something to chew on and keep busy. The toys have helped with high-energy dogs and puppies by giving them proper items to chew on. The toys have been a great way to get some of our more laid-back or timid dogs active and more comfortable with their new surroundings. The KONG toys have been and will continue to be a benefit to all our dogs!

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant will help hundreds of dogs because KONG toys are durable, long-lasting and easy to clean.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Butterscotch came into her foster home in late September. She was shy and timid. During her decompression time, she was very anxious, so we filled a KONG toy with some peanut butter. This helped her calm down and become comfortable with her surroundings.

Butterscotch didn’t know how to be a dog and feel safe around people. The foster family used a KONG toy to initiate play between Butterscotch and the foster’s own dogs. With time and patience and the help of the KONG toys, Butterscotch started to learn how to be a dog and started to trust her foster family. The foster family was also able to provide her a KONG toy for her need to constantly chew. It was great to see Butterscotch become a dog who trusted and was less anxious enough that she could just fully relax.

Luna Mars Animal Project, Inc.: COVID-19 Operation Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The Petfinder Foundation grant was used to purchase supplies used in the care of our animals (i.e. food and litter).

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Due to the Covid-19 pandemic and subsequent lockdown orders, our organization incurred higher costs on basic items. This was mostly due to the necessity of having everything delivered. The Petfinder Foundation grant helped us offset some of these higher costs so that we could continue to provide everything necessary for the wellbeing of our animals.

How many pets did this grant help?

27

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Lancelot is one of our FIV-positive cats. Because of his condition, we provide him with a special diet to help boost his immune system. The Petfinder Foundation grant helped us with the increased cost of procuring his food during the pandemic.

Lancelot was adopted in September.

Pony Tales Refuge & Rehab: COVID-19 Operation Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The grant funds were used to purchase hay for the horses in our shelter.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped us purchase more hay, since we had to use more funds for staffing to do virtual showings of the horses during the Covid shutdown. In May we held a low-cost surrender event to help owners who could no longer afford to care for their horses.

How many pets did this grant help?

24

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Rosie was the second-to-last horse surrendered during the May event. She arrived in rough shape: Blind in one eye, covered in lice, and full of worms, Rosie needed extra care and special attention. She was very nervous around people, and it would often take more than one person to catch her to care for her. In time, though, she began to trust us and she never looked back. Rosie has since been adopted and is living her best life.

Pound Hounds ResQ: COVID-19 Operation Grant
What was the money or product used for?

We used the grant money for vetting, specifically for spays and neuters

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

During COVID, the shelter that we are affiliated with, New York City Animal Care Centers, ceased doing spays and neuters due to the close proximity of the doctors in the room. It was up to the rescue groups to spay and neuter these animals, which was a financial burden. This grant helped us pay for these operations.

How many pets did this grant help?

Four

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Beowoof was found tied up to a gate; the finder would have loved to keep him but had another dog and a baby due in two weeks. Beowoof is friendly and rolled over to give belly rubs, but was uncomfortable when we attempted to fit him with a harness. He’s also incredibly big and strong and needs someone who has the strength to handle him.

Beowoof was facing euthanasia when we pulled him and took him into our rescue. Michael, a friend of a previous adopter, was looking for a dog and fell in love with his picture and write-up. So he adopted him and Beowoof was neutered at a local vet. Michael was in a place in his life where he NEEDED something, and he and Beowoof were exactly what the other needed.

Washington-Wilkes Animal Shelter: Purina Adoption Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The money was used to help defray the cost of adoptions for dogs and cats at the shelter.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant was beneficial to our animals in that they were given a chance to get adopted by helping to pay their adoption fee, or totally defraying it all together.

How many pets did this grant help?

Eight: seven dogs and one cat

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Bessie (first photo) was adopted on August 26, 2020. Bessie came to the shelter as a stray, picked up by the animal control officer in the city of Washington, GA. She was limping on her right front leg, and was taken to Wilkes County Veterinary Services for x-rays to see what the problem was. From reading the x-rays, it was discovered that she had been shot and had damage to her leg, and that an amputation needed to be done. Bessie was brought back to the shelter with pain medication and her picture was posted on Facebook to see if anyone claimed her. She went through a seven-day hold, and we posted a request on Facebook for money for her amputation.

When she was taken to the vet for her amputation, the vets said that she was walking so much better on her leg, and that she would be better off with a little limp that to have the leg amputated. So she was spayed and brought back to the shelter.

When we received the grant money, we reduced the adoption fee for all dogs weighing more than 40 lbs. by half. The price would be $50 instead of $100. Bessie was noticed by her adopter when the woman came to adopt a cat, but she was in the process of moving, so she couldn’t adopt her at that time. Ms. Tillman came back to the shelter on Aug. 26 and wanted to adopt Bessie. She had fallen in love with her and wanted to bring her into her family. Bessie went to her new home the next day.

Goose (second photo), now named Bandit Sweite, or “BamBam” for short, was adopted on Sept. 4, 2020. The adopter came in to the shelter to drop off donations and, on a whim, asked if we had any basset hounds up for adoption. As it happened, we had one senior basset-hound mix named Goose. The adopter got really excited and left the shelter. As it turned out, she went home and told her husband she was going back to the shelter to adopt Goose, sight-unseen. So about 45 minutes after she left, she came back and wanted to adopt Goose.

Since we were using the grant money for our older dogs and those over 40 lbs., Goose fit the bill perfectly. We did the paperwork and Goose was brought out to her new owner. It was love at first sight for both. The adopter called the next day and told us that it was destiny that Goose came into their home. She fit like a glove into their home. Everyone was happy.

Precious (third photo) came to the shelter as a stray and tested positive for heartworms. She had just had a litter of puppies and needed to recover from that. A young man came into the shelter looking for a dog whom his dad might like and who would benefit from having its treatment taken care of. So Precious came to mind.

The adopter took some pictures and sent them to his father. The father was very amenable to adopting her and getting her heartworm treatment. He came to the shelter and, because of Precious needing treatment, we waived the adoption fee. He was very happy and liked her at first sight. She was adopted and taken to Atlanta for her treatment — a great outcome for a very sweet dog.

Dude (fourth photo) was taken into foster care to have his heartworm treatment done. Before he was discharged from the vet’s office after treatment, he had an episode that has given him a cough and he will have to be on steroids for the rest of his life. His foster family have, of course, fallen in love with him, and were happy to adopt him, as his medical condition would make him extremely hard to adopt. So we waived the fee and Dude is now happy and doing great in his “new” home!

We had a Chihuahua (fifth photo) come in who was an owner-surrender. He was a bit overweight, but a really sweet and friendly boy. There was a lady who had called the shelter the week before and asked that, if we ever got in any Chihuahuas, could we please call her and give her the first option to adopt. So she was contacted and came to look at him and fell in love and wanted to take him home. However, she was on a limited income and was not going to get her money for another week. So, to help him get a good home, we paid half her adoption fee and she was ecstatic and took him home that day. This helped a very sweet animal find his furever home quicker.