Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

NaNook & NaKoda's Big Paw Rescue: Disaster Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The 2021 Disaster Grant money was used to purchase two generators and replace an a/c wall unit that was damaged when the power outage occurred.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant allowed us to purchase two generators to run our buildings’ electricity so that the dogs will not be without heat or air conditioning, lights, refrigeration of medications, foods, etc., again. During the last storm, power was knocked out in our area for three days. For three days, our founder dogpiled with all the dogs in our rescue in one room in between outside time to keep them warm.

How many pets did this grant help?

24

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Four days before the Texas storm hit, four puppies (first four photos) were dumped about 20 miles outside of our rural town. We took these babies in and named them Cupid, Teddy, Paddy, and Nora. They were scared and timid and cold. It was difficult to get them to pile up with the other dogs and our founder, but she struggled through and kept these four and all the other dogs warm. Now, if a storm or other disaster ever knocks the power out again, the dogs will be warm or cool in their own spaces without such a struggle to pile up. Food and meds that are refrigerated will be safe.

Bullies and Buddies Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Medical: vet bill

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The generous Petfinder Foundation Emergency Medical Grant helped our sweet boy Nash get the medical care he needed.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We got an urgent call from the shelter about a sweet dog who had possibly been hit by a car and had a broken leg. We named him Nash and rushed him to the emergency vet, who confirmed that Nash had a broken femur (ouch), and that it was broken in three places. We had to wait to do surgery because Nash had blood (fluid) around his lungs and that needed to dissipate. His pain was being managed.

Our sweet boy had surgery to repair his femur, recovered at his foster home and then was adopted to a loving family!

Path of Hope Rescue: KONG Toy Grant
What was the money or product used for?

KONG toys were awarded to Path of Hope Rescue in early December. These toys were distributed to the fosters who house the dogs to provide sturdy toys for the dogs to play with.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It provided us toys that we can include in our foster kits. These kits come with everything a foster could need to care for our pups. Now they include nice toys for the dogs to enjoy.

How many pets did this grant help?

20+ with many more to come. As long as the toys remain in good condition, the foster will continue to let our pups play with them as they move from their fosters to their fur-ever homes.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Angel (first photo) and Sampson were two pups staying with one of our fosters who had a marvelous time playing with the toys. Favorites of theirs were the orange KONG toy and the KONG gorilla. The orange KONG was loved so much they managed to chew the top off in short order. The high-visibility orange made fetch in the grass much easier. The KONG gorilla was also a big hit. They loved the plush texture and found it a great toy to play tug-of-war with. The gorilla lost a foot in the process, but the remainder is still being played with.

Mostly Mutts Animal Rescue & Adoption, Inc.: Petfinder Adoption Options in Action Grant (Invitation Only)
What was the money or product used for?

We used to funds to help purchase Halo harnesses and vibration collars to assist with training and improve the adoptability of visually- and hearing-impaired dogs. The harnesses and collars will go with the dogs to their new homes.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

By being able to provide the adaptive equipment for the impaired dogs, we were able to promote them in a positive way. It helped us to find adopters who are interested in adopting dogs with disabilities.

How many pets did this grant help?

5

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We rescued Baily in July of 2020. She was visually impaired and we knew it would take a special person to adopt her. We knew that the perfect person was out there, but we needed to make the connection. Our employee took the Petfinder.com Adoption Options marketing webinar and it helped us to re-frame the way that we could promote an impaired animal. By being able to provide the adaptive equipment and basic training to the adopter, we found Baily’s forever home! Our trainer is always available to help answer any questions and concerns that may come up after adoption.

Struggles To Snuggles Animal Rescue: Petfinder Adoption Options in Action Grant (Invitation Only)
What was the money or product used for?

We used the $250 to purchase supplies to be able to accommodate handicapped bunnies. Bunnies frequently lose the use of their back legs for varies reasons. We wanted to have an area available and ready to be able to take in one of these bunnies the next time the need arises. With the $250, we bought a handicapped litter box ($40); a new cage with easy-clean trays and doors that open all the way ($111); hospital pads ($24); safe, easy-to-play-with toys ($16); a handicapped ramp ($63); and special bowls if we have a bunny with a head tilt ($26).

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped us to expand the type of bunnies we can take in. The young and average bunny loves hopping around and being active, so that’s how most of our enclosures are set up — for an active bunny. We wanted to create a safe, quiet, and manageable area for a handicapped bunny.

How many pets did this grant help?

It’s hard to answer this question because this set us up to be able to help many bunnies in the future.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We currently have a weak boy, Archie, in this space. He came to us with teeth growing up into his nose. Since his teeth were so long, he couldn’t eat, so when we got him, he was malnourished and weak. We had to syringe-feed him the first couple of days. Since we didn’t have a handicapped bunny in this space yet, we thought it would be perfect for him: He would have easy access to his litter box, hay, and food until he could get his strength back up. It was perfect for him. He is currently still in this space since we haven’t received any calls to help with a handicapped bunny. Once we do have a handicapped bunny, Archie will be strong enough to move to one of the other enclosures.

Wildthunder Wildlife and Animal Rehabilitation Sanctuary: Senior Pet Adoption Grants
What was the money or product used for?

Cayden has not yet been adopted, so we have not spent the money. We will use it to cover his adoption fee, the estimated costs of senior care over the next two years, and four bags of prescription food. It will take a special adopter for Cayden and we hope that offering some assistance will help us find a forever home that won’t be afraid of adopting a senior with special needs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Although Cayden has not yet been adopted, these grants are valuable in helping to promote some of the cats who have been at the shelter or have special needs (like Cayden). We haven’t given up hope that we’ll find the perfect forever home for him!

How many pets did this grant help?

It will help one

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Cayden was found in the ditch along a gravel road with another cat, dehydrated and emaciated (bottom photo). Upon intake and examination, we found that he had maggots in his eyes, mouth and penis. We can’t even imagine how much pain he was in and we are so thankful someone found them and brought them to Wildthunder to get the medical care they both desperately needed. Cayden means “fighter,” and he certainly is one! He had a will to live, and within three days of treatment, he was up walking!

Due to the injuries he sustained, he has ongoing urinary issues and requires a special diet of Hill’s Science Diet Prescription C/D food. Not only is Cayden a senior, he also requires special care for the urinary complications.

Cayden lives in a community room with other cats with similar special needs. He is a sweet boy with the bright blue eyes and we would love for him to find his forever home. After everything he has been through, he deserves that.

Our sweet Cayden was not yet been adopted despite our promoting him on our page with the added benefit of the Petfinder Foundation grant. We have not given up hope, though, and will continue to promote him so we can find his forever home.

Meet Cayden here.

Meriden Humane Society: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Manny was left on our doorstep in terrible condition. Immediately after we found him and a did quick scan of his physical shape, we brought him to our vet for a full examination. Ten days after that full exam, Manny received the following services:

Ear ablation (ear with tumor)
Mass removed near testicle
Pathology report: ear tumor tested benign; scrotum mass tested malignant
Neutered
8 teeth removed
Echocardiogram for detected heart murmur

After all procedures, his total vet care exceeded $3,000.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant was applied towards the $3,000 in veterinary expenses needed to treat the variety of medical issues Manny was facing.

How many pets did this grant help?

One: Manny

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

On the morning of Oct. 10, 2020, we found this lovely little guy named Manny at our door. Manny’s owners had left a note saying they could not afford to care for him and knew he deserved more. We rushed Manny to our vet, who quickly determined that Manny had very bad teeth and a tumor that went deep into his ear and connected multiple places down into the ear canal.

Needless to say, Manny required a lot of medical attention before we could find him a home. We worked to find a specialist who would advise us on the ear tumor, and ensured he got the dental work he needed and was neutered and fully vaccinated. Along the way, Manny was diagnosed with a malignant scrotum mass, although we learned that the tumors in his ears were benign.

All during his recovery, Manny spent his days in foster care to ensure he had as comfortable and safe an environment as possible in which to heal and regain his strength.

We are happy to report that Manny was officially adopted by his foster family right before Christmas 2020 and continues to live an amazingly happy, spoiled (and well-deserved) life with his incredible forever family. Manny’s story is one of true success and illustrates the power of dedication, love, and perseverance.

Grateful Hearts Animal Rescue: Senior Pet Adoption Grants
What was the money or product used for?

The money was used for the adoption fee and kitty food.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant helped to get a photo of Dr. Seuss out there.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Dr. Seuss is a senior and FIV-positive kitty. Senior kitties and especially those who are FIV-positive are very hard to find homes for. Dr. Seuss was just adopted by a wonderful lady who was looking for a companion animal. Dr. Seuss was perfect for her!

Saving All Paws North Jersey, Inc.: COVID-19 Operation Grant
What was the money or product used for?

See below.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant enabled us to spay and neuter our adoptable animals prior to adoption and to keep our adoption fees down.

How many pets did this grant help?

Four kittens

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This is Storm (first photo) and Bear (second photo), two kittens we were able to spay and neuter using funds from the grant. Both kittens have been adopted. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, we weren’t able to get appointments to spay or neuter any of our adoptable cats and kittens through our normal low-cost source. We had to make appointments at a full-cost veterinary office and the grant money helped offset these additional costs.

Oracle Animal Rescue & Rehabilitation, Inc.: Petfinder Adoption Options in Action Grant (Invitation Only)
What was the money or product used for?

We received a grant for $500 for training for our dogs with behavior issues. We matched the grant money 1.5 times with donations from our donors and donations of time from two professional trainers. Because of the pandemic, group classes were not available. Instead we were able to schedule 22 private sessions for five different dogs, working on a variety of issues, from lack of basic manners (jumping up and mouthing) and separation anxiety/isolation distress to dog-aggression and people-reactivity.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Dogs with behavioral issues can be difficult, if not impossible, to place in adoptive homes. Instead of these wonderful animals having families of their own, they become long-timers in rescue or, worse, go from home to home, returning repeatedly to the rescue as their behavioral issue manifests in each home. Of the five dogs who were lucky enough to work with our trainers over the last few months, two have been adopted and two have gone into, or been able to stay in, their foster-to-adopt homes. The fifth dog, while not yet adoptable, has made significant progress with the help of his trainers.

How many pets did this grant help?

5

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

It’s difficult to express how much impact this training grant had; it was absolutely critical to the dogs involved. Liam (first photo) is a 1-year-old terrier mix we took in after his family lost their home in a fire. He was very undersocialized and had no prior training in basic manners. He had never been on a leash when we got him and pancaked on the ground every time we put a leash on. But off-leash, he was a maniac. He turned into a 65-lb. missile, happily running and launching himself at people. He was a friendly mess.

The wonderful couple fostering Liam had no obedience training experience. One session with the trainer gave them the tools to get Liam moving in the right direction, toward being a polite guy who knew his manners. During his adoption home-check a few weeks later, he was such a gentleman and his new family commented on how well-mannered he was compared to his two new canine sisters. He remains in his permanent home.

Sadie (second and third photos) is an Australian cattle dog who came from the county animal shelter, pregnant and with a large-caliber bullet lodged in her head. We didn’t see any separation anxiety in her foster home, but after less than two weeks in her foster-to-adopt home, Sadie destroyed about $3,000 worth of window coverings. That would normally ensure a dog’s return to the rescue, because most adopters aren’t both willing or able to address such a serious problem.

Because of our training grant, we were able to respond immediately with assistance for Sadie and her foster-to-adopt family. Combined with anti-anxiety medication, the separation-anxiety protocol we’ve worked on with her foster-to-adopter and the trainers has allowed Sadie to stay in her new home. Although not adopted yet, her foster-to-adopter is grateful for the support we’ve been able to give her and has no intention of returning Sadie.

Arvin (fourth and fifth photos) is an 8-month-old Lab/hound mix who was returned to the rescue after a few months in a foster-to-adopt home. Originally a well-balanced puppy, Arvin was in crisis when he came back. He was highly reactive to all people, lunging, barking and threatening to bite. He was terrified. We have devoted most of the training grant to helping Arvin.

He is now able to spend time in public places like shopping centers and restaurant patios without reacting to most people. He is not yet able to handle people approaching him, but he has made tremendous progress and is working hard. We are committed to marshaling funds to continue his training, with the hope that he will be adoptable in time.

Lily 2 (sixth and seventh photos) was a great dog wrapped in a difficult-to-adopt package: a strong, boisterous, 1 1/2-year-old American pit bull terrier. She was returned by one potential adopter after two days for being “an angel inside the house and a devil outside.” Her training centered on directing her boundless energy and improving her self-control, making her more manageable. She has been adopted by a family that loves her enthusiasm, but also appreciates that she is able to listen and focus.

Lily 3 (eighth photo) is a 4-year-old cattle dog mix who ran loose in our town (and had multiple litters of puppies) before we were finally able to catch her. She was a timid but perfect dog in her foster home for five months. Her foster family planned to adopt her once she recovered from kidney failure (possibly caused by anesthesia during her spay).

Without apparent warning, Lily 3 and another female dog in the foster home began fighting. Neither dog had a problem with any other dog we’d seen them with. The altercations were increasing in severity. Despite work by the trainer and her foster, we determined that Lily 3 could not safely remain in the home. The benefit in her training, though, was that we are confident we did everything we could to keep Lily 3 in the home where she was loved and that, when that didn’t work, we were able to get her ready to safely go to a new home. She is now in a foster-to-adopt home where she is wowing her new family with her lovely behavior and personality.

Our experience with our small sample of five dogs showed us what we expected to see: Behavioral modification and training saves lives because it gets dogs into homes and keeps them there. We’re incredibly grateful and will work to make our training program a permanent feature of our rescue.