Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

Happy Tails Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

For medical and surgical care of a leg and foot on Marvel the cat

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Marvel is now able to run and play with all his friends. He no longer gets his foot caught in things, and he can run and jump! He uses his leg like it is pain-free and he has become quite agile!

How many pets did this grant help?

One cat, Marvel

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

“Morning, y’all. My name is Marvel, and I am one lucky cat! Here is my story. My owner picked me up and said we were going for a ride and I was a good kitty. After riding a while, I guess he needed some fresh air, so he put the window down. Next thing I knew, I was flying through the air! What in the world?? I remember my foot hurting as I laid there for I don’t know how long…and then someone picked me up and I was warm again. Then there were lots of bright lights and a doctor telling me I was a good kitty. They snuggled me and fed me and took care of me. I am all better now — except that my left front paw does not seem to work well. I get around just like the best of them, but will need to have a part of that leg removed so it won’t hurt ever again.

“How is that for a lucky cat? After being with the vet for several weeks, I am now with my foster mom. She says I am a hoot! I purr all the time and am quite the fun little guy! I really hope I am lucky enough to find a real forever home! I am really am a sweet guy!”

We’d had Marvel for four weeks. He was growing and doing well. The vet said that the lower joint of Marvel’s right front leg would have to be removed. He was sweet and gentle and got around well, but as he dragged that lower leg, it was becoming swollen, red and abrased.

The grant enabled Marvel to get his foot surgically fixed so he could run and play and jump! Without this he would not be able to walk normally on his leg or foot. Marvel has been adopted!)

Danbury Animal Welfare Society: Dogs Playing for Life Mentorship Grant (Invitation Only)
What was the money or product used for?

The grant funds were used to cover tuition costs to send Gina Riccio for training at the Dogs Playing for Life mentorship in Austin, Texas.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The program helped teach DAWS staff and volunteers better and quicker ways of getting dogs adopted and in turn enabled the shelter to rescue more dogs and save more lives.

How many pets did this grant help?

Approximately 150 dogs

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We took in an owner-surrender in October. His name is Onyx and he is a 60-lb., 7-year-old male pit bull. He was traumatized after living in a home for his entire seven years of life and was now put in a shelter environment. He was extremely depressed and upset and it took him some time to come around to new people. I slowly introduced him to other dogs and people. He loved playing in a yard with them and enjoying walks, etc. Sometimes I even felt bad for him, because he played so nicely with any dog of any size that it appeared that they were almost beating up him. He thrived after these play dates and took so well to the loose-leash walking, it was amazing. Initially when he came in, it was very hard to hold him on a leash, but with a few sessions of loose-leash training, he did wonderfully and became a pleasure to walk. Shortly thereafter, I was able to take him to any adoption event. Since then, he has gone foster-to-adopt with a lovely couple and been introduced to his doggie in-laws and has been absolutely perfect! I will be finalizing his adoption this week!

Los Angeles County Department of Animal Care and Control: P.L.A.Y. Pet Beds
What was the money or product used for?

The P.L.A.Y. beds were distributed equally to our animal-care centers located in Carson and Lancaster. Since we could not give every dog in our care centers a bed, we gave the beds to senior dogs, as well as to those with medical conditions. The beds continue to be used by our dogs at both of our care centers, benefiting their comfort, health, and adoptability.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Despite our efforts to provide comfort to our animals, the shelter environment can be incredibly stressful. These beds provide additional comfort for our dogs, particularly those who may be older or have a medical condition, which reduces stress and improves their overall health. When dogs are more comfortable and less anxious, they socialize better with other dogs and humans. This increases their likelihood of being adopted as potential adopters interact with them. Overall, these beds have provided an additional level of comfort that our care centers would not have been able to provide due to limited resources. We cannot speak for our animals, but we can safely assume that they are incredibly grateful — as we definitely are!

How many pets did this grant help?

50

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Elmo (first photo) is an 8-year-old Chihuahua mix who came to the Carson Animal Care Center (ACC) as a stray on Dec. 15, 2018. After almost two months in the care center, this mature pup was finally adopted on Valentine’s Day.

Described as incredibly laid-back, Ashley (second photo) is a 7-year-old Akita mix who was also adopted out of the Carson ACC. Despite getting into an older age, Ashley still loved to play and socialize with other dogs. After almost two months at the ACC, Ashley was taken in by a rescue group.

Butte Humane Society: P.L.A.Y. Pet Beds
What was the money or product used for?

We received 40 P.L.A.Y. beds through this generous grant. It took less than two days for us to provide these to families who’d been displaced by the Camp Fire. We did limit them to one per household. We were serving about 200 households a day during this time and we’re still serving about 140 per day now.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

On Nov. 8, 2018, the Camp Fire permanently changed the lives of thousands of people and their animals instantly and permanently. They left their homes, many still in their pajamas, and rushed down the hill and out of town as fast as they could, leaving almost everything they had behind. On Nov. 9, Butte Humane Society started a Pet Pantry to give these people the items they needed so they could care for their animals and hopefully find a way to keep them and not have to surrender them.

How many pets did this grant help?

Forty, but more than 18,000 animals have been helped through the Pet Pantry.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

The Camp Fire was chaos and many of our staff and volunteers were operating on autopilot and in semi-shock during this time. There are so many stories of people sharing what they lost, breaking down in tears at the kindness of others to make sure that they had food, crates, litter, leashes, etc. One of the most popular items were always the beds we had and it was very challenging keeping enough of them in stock. People shared repeatedly that this little touch of comfort and normalcy helped their dogs and themselves have hope. Imagine, living in your truck for weeks because there was no place to go and how good it would feel to have a nice bed for your dog to sleep in in the back of your pickup truck. It was so important to people to feel they had the ability to make something just a little better in their lives for those they loved. Thank you!

National Mill Dog Rescue: Senior Pet Adoption Grants
What was the money or product used for?

We waived the $300 adoption fee for Sophie, a one-eyed, 7-year-old Maltese who had been a puppy-mill breeding dog all of her life until she was rescued.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Waiving the fee was a nice bonus for the family that adopted Sophie. It may have influenced their decision to choose her over another dog.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Recently, one of our special senior Maltese pups finally got her adoption day! Sophie has fought quite the battle to get to this day, including birthing a litter of pups she was carrying when she arrived at National Mill Dog Rescue, losing an eye (prior to arrival), and an injured leg! She is one tough little fighter. She certainly deserves the wonderful family who found her! She will have a terrific fur sister named Molly, too. Congratulations on your forever family, Sophie! We wish you all the best in the world! You can see a video of her here.

Animal Rescue New Orleans: Senior Pet Adoption Grants
What was the money or product used for?

ARNO used the funds to provide meds for Sweetie and offer meds included with her adoption.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped ARNO provide much-needed meds to Sweetie and also offer future meds to her adopter to make her more adoptable.

How many pets did this grant help?

One beautiful, disabled senior

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

The Petfinder Foundation helped bring about a miracle for a senior pet: Sweetie was given a chance. Animal Rescue New Orleans rescued her from a municipal shelter, where she had been brought in the back of a pick-up truck with her gentle muzzle duct-taped. She could not walk on her back legs and would have been euthanized at the shelter had we not rescued her. X-rays later showed arthritis from old injuries, but also that Sweetie had been shot with a pellet gun. She still carries plastic pellets in her body.

Although when we got her, Sweetie could not walk on her back legs without a sling, but our vet believed that, with cage rest and medication, she would be able walk again. When you first awarded ARNO this grant, she had just started to walk. She has since gone into a foster-to-adopt home, where she is walking with no sling and doing great. She is going to be adopted. We could not have done it without your support! Thank you, Petfinder Foundation.

Butte Humane Society: Disaster Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The support we received was used for our Pet Pantry. The Camp Fire hit our community on Nov. 8, 2018, and raged for weeks. We started our Pet Food and Supply Pantry on the 9th. To date, we have helped more than 6,000 households and 18,000 animals who were impacted by the fire.

We also provided veterinary care for injured animals and are continuing to provide veterinary services for families displaced by the fire.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This support helped thousands of people in the immediate aftermath of the fire to be able to meet the immediate needs of their animals.

How many pets did this grant help?

More than 18,000

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

One of our goals during this crisis was to help people keep their animals so they wouldn’t have to surrender them. One story that stands out was a 67-year-old man named Garth. He and his wife had recently retired. He was a former roofer and construction manager. They retired and planned to live in Paradise and enjoy their retirement with their dog, Quincy. Then the fire happened, and Garth and his wife are now living with his former supervisor. Their dog was at the North Valley Animal Disaster Group shelter because his supervisor had a dog who wasn’t friendly to other dogs. Garth got a crate from us at no cost and started to cry because that meant he could get Quincy and have him stay with his wife and him.

Gwinnett County Animal Welfare and Enforcement: Senior Pet Adoption Grants
What was the money or product used for?

Heartworm treatment and heartworm preventative

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The dog, Coal, was adopted by a family that wanted him but did not have the funds for heartworm treatment. This grant helped get Coal adopted into a loving family.

How many pets did this grant help?

One dog

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Coal is a friendly Chow mix who is approximately 8 years old. He is a curious and playful dude who follows simple commands. He came to the shelter on Oct. 31, 2018, as a stray from the Snellville area. A wonderful family came to our shelter looking for a dog and Coal caught their eye immediately. When they took him out to the bonding pen, they all fell in love with him. Coal was heartworm-positive, and this grant help pay for the heartworm treatment as well as heartworm preventative for Coal to keep him healthy. Coal is loved very much by his new family.

Pet Adoption Network, Inc.: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

See below.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We only charge a nominal fee, $100, for an older animal like Little Bit, so this sponsorship for his medical care of recurring prescription meds really helped.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

The $45 donation was used to purchase medicine for the sponsored dog, Little Bit. He suffers from dry eye and skin allergies and needs the medication daily. The really great news is that LITTLE BIT HAS BEEN ADOPTED!!! He has a loving mom and companion sister, and is showing his playful, happy attitude now that he is in a home with fewer animals.

Stephens County Humane Society: Petfinder Adoption Options in Action Grant (Invitation Only)
What was the money or product used for?

Stephens County Humane Society purchased new Petco folding crates with our grant money. Many of our existing crates were bent, starting to show signs of rust, had broken or missing bottoms and were rapidly becoming unusable. We were definitely in need of new crates, and were delighted when our grant request was approved.

Because of a company-wide sale going on at Petco at the time of purchase, we were able to order two more crates than originally planned, for a total of seven medium, seven large and five extra-large Petco premium, two-door crates!

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The crates we were able to purchase with this grant have helped in so many ways! First and foremost, we have been able to supply new crates to our families taking dogs home as part of our foster-to-adopt (sleepover) program. The crates are returned to us at the time of adoption or when the dog is returned because the family decided not to adopt. Previously, all we had to offer were old crates with missing or broken trays, bent doors, etc. Offering new crates provides better security for the dog, looks much better and is representative of the image Stephens County Humane Society wants to portray.

A second way in which we have been helped has been in our foster program. As of this writing, we have four crates out with puppies in temporary foster programs. It is much safer for young, vulnerable puppies to be in foster homes until after their second booster shot and for us to be able to send a large crate so the puppies have plenty of room to play, sleep and begin puppy-pad training is key to the success of our puppy foster program.

A third use for these crates has been at on-site adoptions. These crates are so lovely, it gives our on-site adoptions the professional appearance we are seeking to assure our potential adopters that we are a legitimate animal-welfare rescue and shelter. And having the additional crates means our on-sites can include more dogs and/or we can have more than one on-site scheduled at a time.

Lastly, we use one of the new crates in our office for dogs who need a little extra TLC. We had a young pup who came to us with a fractured rear leg. He was our office companion for several weeks, kenneled in one of our new Petco crates. In another situation, we had an adult male who developed a severe infection following neuter surgery. He also spent several days in the office, where we could keep him calm and give him the care he needed while he healed. (This boy – Rigsby – is in one of the included pictures.) Yet one more example is Bettie Jo. This young pup (included in the pictures submitted with this report) was adopted and returned after the family realized they could not give her the care she needed. She came back severely malnourished, with a dull, brittle coat. Bettie Jo was kenneled in the office, where we could give her personal care, monitor her food intake, keep her warm and get her back on the road to health. These are just a few examples of this valuable purpose for our new crates. (See the story below about Jack for yet another example.)

How many pets did this grant help?

Because we used the grant for crates that have multiple and repeated uses, determining a specific number of pets helped is difficult. A conservative estimate of animals helped is 50-75 from the date we received the grant up to the date of this report. And, of course, as outlined above, the crates continue to help us in a myriad of ways.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We recently had a little Jack Russell terrier at the shelter named Jack. He came to us as an owner-surrender, covered in fleas and in questionable mental health. It was obvious that Jack had been treated with a heavy hand because of his tendency to cower and be just a little hand-shy.

For three mornings in a row, while housed in our kennels, he was nervous and snappy and very difficult for staff and volunteers to deal with. So we set him up in the office, in one of our new Petco crates, with a blanket and a pet bed and let him live in the office, closing the crate at night.

What a difference! Throughout the day, he would routinely “put himself to bed” in the crate and take a nap, and we could see his confidence rising, knowing he had his own safe “den” to run to. He became more open and trusting and the snappiness completely disappeared.

Jack was adopted into a great, dog-experienced home the day after his neuter surgery. As a result of his time as our office dog, we were able to share a lot of information about him that will, hopefully, ensure his success with his new family. And we emphasized the need for Jack to have a crate where he could feel secure and have a safe place of his own to go.