Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

Paris Animal Welfare Society: Cat Enrichment
What was the money or product used for?

This grant was used to help us give our felines the best enrichment possible — a CATIO!

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Shortly after receiving the grant, we started making more plans, and building quickly came after! We are still in renovation, as we are making sure it will benefit the cats as much as possible, but have been successful in taking some of our cats out!

In the photos is a 10-month-old cat with chronic upper-respiratory infections. Unfortunately, even with numerous antibiotics and medical intervention, Scott will always have problems with URI’s. However, since letting Scottie and Clarkson (his cage buddy) out daily in the enclosure, we have seen a tremendous decrease in URIs and an increase in their overall happiness and health! We were able to get some great social-media photos and are hoping to reach his forever family soon! Until then, Scottie is enjoying the outside life — and doing so safely!

How many pets did this grant help?

50 thus far, with 1,200 expected annually.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Scottie is still available for adoption, but his health is increasing every day thanks to our new catio! Our staff are still working hard on finishing the final touches (including ladders and climbers that volunteers made) and hope to be finished soon. Scottie can be seen at our shelter location as of now, but is expected to move to an off-site adoption location as soon as his health improves.

Kitten Angels: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

Purchased special food for a senior cat.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The cat required senior food that was gentle on his system.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Salem was the cat in our care who was older and overlooked by soooo many families because he was not a kitten. The special food helped Salem keep his geriatric digestive system in tip-top condition so that he could concentrate all his attention on giving out purrs to families looking to adopt. He found his forever home after being in our care for several months.

Texas Humane Heroes: Play Yard Renovation Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The generous $4975 grant went towards our new play yard at our Leander Adoption Center. The prior fencing was deteriorating and was deemed unusable for our dogs. It was devastating to have the land and space to have playgroups, but be unable to do so because of the condition of the fencing. This grant allowed us to tear down the old and unusable fencing and to install a brand-new play yard for our dogs to enjoy! The play yard has two double-gate entries, as well as a fence with a gate in the middle to separate into two play yards if desired. Our staff, volunteers, and, most importantly, dogs are already loving the new play yard! We use it every day and we couldn’t be happier with the result!

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The most rewarding benefit this grant provided was to improve the lives of the dogs in our care. We are now able to have multiple playgroups daily in a safe and secure environment. The play yards were also built at a far enough distance from the kennels that we can also give dogs a quiet place to play and relax. This grant truly helped us improve the quality of the lives of the Texas Humane Heroes dogs.

How many pets did this grant help?

A limitless number of dogs will benefit from this grant! Texas Humane Heroes pulled over 1,500 dogs into our program in 2018. We are on track to do the same, if not bring in more, in 2019. All the dogs who are currently in our care and all the dogs that come into Texas Humane Heroes moving forward will have the opportunity to enjoy these play yards. Whether in be in playgroups, during quality time with staff and volunteers, or during meet-and-greets with potential adopters, these play yards will be enjoyed by all the dogs who enter Texas Humane Heroes.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Meet Lacey (first photo)! Lacey is a 6-month-old mixed breed with a heart of gold. Her favorite thing to do is to participate in playgroups in our new play yard! Her second favorite thing to do is play in the dog pools and to chase after water from the hose in our new play yard. She LOVES water! We know that Lacey’s fun and loving personality will get her adopted quickly, but as of now she is currently available for adoption. You can see her on Petfinder here.

Second Chance Pet Adoption League, Inc.: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

Money was used to pay for a portion of the medical bills for care of one of the 17 dogs we took in from a recent local hoarding-case rescue.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The money from this Q2 donation received in July helped to pay for necessary medical care of the dogs in our care.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This dog was one of 17 we took into our rescue from a local hoarding case of almost 200 dogs. All were in need of immediate medical care, including spay/neuter, dentals, surgery and treatment for ear and skin infections. We are happy to report that this dog, Colonel Mustard, has been adopted!

Animal House Shelter: Purina New Year, New Home
What was the money or product used for?

The grant was used to support our programs that waive adoption donations or give discounts to those in need.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant gave us the ability to adopt out pets to those who would otherwise be unable to due to financial restrictions.

How many pets did this grant help?

4

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Wendy was relinquished to the shelter after her owner passed away. Because she was 12 years old, many people passed her over, until one day a very nice older lady on a fixed income came in and met her and fell in love. AHS was able to waive the adoption donation as part of a senior-to-senior program to make the adoption a reality!

Here is a list of 12 pets who were able to be adopted with the help of the grant, with detailed information about each pet’s original adoption donation and their discounts:

Wendy (first photo)- $300 of $300 was waived to help a senior on a fixed income adopt a senior pet.
Slick- $175 of $350 was discounted to allow a struggling military family to adopt.
Willy (second photo)- $300 of $300 was waived to help a low-income family adopt a senior pet.
Malibu and Cubby- $400 of $400 was waived to allow this bonded pair of dogs to be adopted together. The family would have otherwise been unable to adopt them both due to funds.
Macy- $112.50 of $450 was discounted for a low-income family to adopt a puppy.
Opal (third photo)- $75 of $75 waived to allow a low-income senior to adopt a cat.
Prince (fourth photo)- $112.50 of $450 was discounted for a struggling family to adopt a puppy.
Caroline- $300 of $300 was waived so that her foster could officially adopt her and make her a part of the family forever!
Rainy- $112.50 of $450 was discounted for a low-income family to adopt a puppy.
Weston (fifth photo)- $100 of $400 discounted for a disabled veteran.
Harper- $100 of $400 discounted for a young man getting on his feet. He plans to have Harper as his comfort dog.

Passion for Pets Rescue: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

The money was used for Willow, a 6-year-old Maltese.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The money went toward her vetting, which was over $300.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Willow is a 6-year-old Maltese-bichon mix. We saved her from an Amish puppy mill. They no longer had any use for her and were going to euthanize her. We had her vetted and then paid for her to be transported to Maine. In Maine, she was in a foster home for several weeks, learning that people were not bad. She loved nothing more than to snuggle. She was adopted at the end of June by a family in New Hampshire who have another Maltese and she is doing GREAT.

LifeLine Animal Project: Dogs Playing for Life Mentorship Grant (Invitation Only)
What was the money or product used for?

The $1,000 grant was used to cover the tuition cost for Jabari Gadsden, a LifeLine Animal Project team member at the DeKalb County shelter, to attend the Dogs Playing for Life Mentorship Program in late May.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant has greatly affected our organization in terms of opening the eyes of many to the benefits of playgroup, both for the dogs and ourselves. It has built a lot of confidence and skill when it comes to handling dogs for both staff and volunteers learning from and using the techniques shown during DPFL. The pets in our care have been more manageable, more presentable to adopters both in the kennel and play yards, and their overall quality of life seems to have improved.

How many pets did this grant help?

250 to date. Jabari participates in weekly puppy-room playgroups, which have approximately 20 dogs in them, and there have been roughly 12 weeks since his mentorship.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Playgroups change lives. Two of our dogs, Billy and Cho, have been specifically impacted by the Dogs Playing for Life program. Billy (pictured lying down) is an easygoing, lovely dog who enjoys the company of other dogs. His favorite thing is going into a playgroup and rolling around on his back, inviting other dogs to come over and say hello. When a dog will roll on its back next to him, he is in heaven. Because of his continual attendance at playgroups, he stayed very social even though he was at the shelter for an extended period of time. He was so social that he could be used to help dogs like Cho (second photo), who had a harder time being incorporated into groups.

Cho has barrier reactivity, not because she wants other dogs to move away, but because she wants them to play. Cho wants to play with other dogs so badly and has no impulse control, so playgroups are teaching her better manners! Cho goes into playgroups so that other dogs can teach her what is appropriate and what is not, and through this play therapy, she is becoming more adoptable with every session. Billy has found his forever home, and Cho is on her way to being highly adoptable due to the power of DPFL!

West Valley Humane Society: P.L.A.Y. Pet Beds
What was the money or product used for?

This grant awarded us 20 pet beds that we were able to use to provide comfort for the dogs on our adoption floor. These beds were lightweight enough that they were able to be washed many times in order to give that comfort to multiple dogs while they were in our care.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

These beds (along with canine enrichment) go a long way to provide a sense of comfort and stability for the dogs on our adoption floor. Comfort and enrichment lead to higher adoption rates, less noise on the adoption floor and a healthier, more centered pet.

Due to the high turnover of dogs, we are not often able to provide beds or any longer-lasting comfort items due to sanitation issues. These beds are a great addition to the adoption floor, as they are thin enough to be washed and sanitized along with blankets and towels. This made a huge difference in the long-term comfort of our dogs.

How many pets did this grant help?

60

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Charlie came to us as an owner-surrender in pretty bad shape. He is a 102-lb. border collie mix who was double the body weight he should have been. Charlie had low mobility and sore joints, and he struggled on the adoption floor. Providing Charlie with one of the beds from the P.L.A.Y. grant really helped us to provide him a soft cushion for his body, which allowed him to have some comfort during his weight-loss journey.

Charlie has since been relocated to a foster home to help him lose weight in a more effective way while receiving more individualized care. His bed continues to provide him comfort in his foster home, where he is doing very well!

Humane Society of Lincoln County: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The funds were used to offset the cost of Bella’s, a senior dog’s, eye-removal surgery. The grant funds allowed us to provided medical treatment for both a dog and a kitten.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Thanks to the Petfinder Foundation’s Emergency Medical Grant, which offset the cost of Bella’s surgery, we were able to assist two other animals with medical emergencies. The grant also facilitated a positive outcome for Mila, a pregnant pug, who, after giving birth to a litter of three pups, none of whom survived, developed a severe case of mastitis. It took repeated visits to the veterinarian to get the infection under control, only for us to discover that she was heartworm-positive. With the grant covering her mastitis treatments, we were able to provide the funds for her heartworm treatment. I’m happy to report that she has been adopted and is doing well.

Nubby, the kitten, was turned in to the shelter with a badly mangled tail. Funds from the grant covered the cost of having Nubby’s tail surgically removed. She is now a happy kitten and doesn’t even miss the tail.

How many pets did this grant help?

Three

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Bella was turned in to the shelter as a stray (first photo). Upon initial examination, it was obvious that she had been neglected. Not only was her fur matted and her nails overgrown, her right eye was matted with discharge and her hair was so long, it was difficult to examine the eye. Amazingly, even in her poor condition, she was as friendly as they come and very spunky for a senior dog. In spite of being a senior dog with a costly medical problem that would need to be addressed before she could be considered for adoption, the decision was made that she was worth trying to save. After several attempts to try and save her eye, it was determined that in the best interest of Bella, the eye had to be removed (second photo).

It took her a little time to adjust, but overall she did well. Being a senior dog, now with one eye, we knew it would take a special person to provide Bella with a loving home, and Sonia was that special person (third photo). She had seen Bella on Petfinder and she knew she had to make her part of the family. Sonia already had one senior dog at home and felt that she needed a friend. It all worked out wonderfully and their family is now complete (fourth photo).

Animal Aid of Tulsa: Cat Enrichment
What was the money or product used for?

Enrichment in our cat room, which houses seven to eight cats at a time and over 100 cats annually.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We have been able to provide updated sources of play and entertainment for the cats in our cat room, including an indoor “catio.” The cats love running, hiding and playing with each other.

How many pets did this grant help?

Over 100 annually with the improvements we’ve been able to make.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Simon is now able to enjoy our improved catio! This room helps him adjust to being an indoor kitty. He was at the vet’s office for a bit, then moved to a foster home, and now he’s able to socialize in our cat room with the seven other cats! Meet Simon here.