Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

Fearless Kitty Rescue: Senior Pet Adoption Grants
What was the money or product used for?

The money was used to provide the adopter with funds for the diet and medical needs Teddy must have in order to stay healthy and continue to thrive as a senior kitty.

The funds will specifically cover Teddy’s monthly expenses, including his raw-diet food and his subcutaneous fluids and supplies, including needles, lactated ringers, and line. It will also provide funding for the dietary supplements Teddy is on.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant was the catalyst that helped a senior kitty with a lot of special medical needs, and who needed special food and care, get adopted. It’s hard to find the right adopter who will take on a kitty they know is going to have a lot of expenses even before the walk out the door. This $1,000 grant is what made the difference for the adopter, knowing they will have the funding to keep providing Teddy with the things he will need to stay as healthy as he can, as long as he can.

Teddy’s length of stay in our rescue was over 550 days by the time he was adopted. This kitty was so deserving of a home, and this grant is what made it possible!

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Teddy was rescued from the streets in Cottonwood, AZ, in 2019. This sweet boy is FIV+ and has GI (stomach) issues, ear issues, and kidney disease. He had a tough life on the streets, and we wanted him to feel all the love an indoor cat should feel. He became a volunteer and staff favorite right away at the rescue, and we all knew it would take a special someone to give Teddy his forever home.

Well, in March 2021, that special someone saw Teddy on our website and just had to make him part of their home. They understood all of Teddy’s needs, and they were happy to do whatever Teddy needed for the rest of his life. They reached out to us and we not only set up a meet-and-greet, they came in several times afterwards to learn how to give Teddy his subcutaneous fluids.

Because of logistics, the adopters were not able to take Teddy home until May, but that only made things more special for Teddy at the rescue because we knew he’d be going home soon and he was given even more love than ever (if that was possible)!

Humane Society of Henderson County: P.L.A.Y. Pet Beds
What was the money or product used for?

The product was used to help our dogs to feel that they have a safe and comfortable place to sleep while they are in our care at the shelter.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helps us to provide further care for our animals in need, specifically dogs who feel more comfortable in a cushioned bed. Many of our dogs come in scared, confused, and with medical issues. We hope to make them as comfortable as we can while they are in our care.

How many pets did this grant help?

10

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

I would like to spotlight a dog named RJ. RJ is a Lab-shar pei mix. RJ has suffered with a severe skin condition for a long time and is finally getting the treatment he needs to be his beautiful self again. A bed is always provided, but our usual dog beds are a plastic material that is not comfortable for an itchy skin condition. The P.L.A.Y bed helps RJ feel better until we can clear up his skin condition and find him a loving home!

Many of the dogs who come to us are scared and suffer from medical conditions and anxiety. Many don’t understand why they had to leave their home. We have had two such situations recently: One dog lost an owner in a house fire and the other also lost his owner to death. Some of our dogs have simply been surrendered because they are no longer wanted. Any and all bits of comfort we can give our animals is so important. We want to thank you for helping us with our mission!

Humane Society of the Palouse: Cat Enrichment
What was the money or product used for?

The money was used to order 200 Stretch and Scratch cat scratchers for the cats in our care. These are corrugated-carboard scratchers that can attach to the door of each cat kennel to provide an appropriate scratching area for the cats.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Not only does this help keep our cats physically healthy by filing their nails, it also keeps them mentally healthy by providing them with the freedom to express normal behavior (which is one of the five freedoms for animals). We strive to give the pets in our shelter the highest quality of care possible, and we ensure their five freedoms are met. By doing so, we have seen a huge decrease in aggression behaviors, depression, and kennel shut-down in the animals at HSoP.

We are extremely passionate about making each animal comfortable and happy during their temporary stay with us, and your grant allowed us to enrich the lives of over 200 cats!

How many pets did this grant help?

More than 200 (kittens who are cohabiting a kennel may share a scratcher).

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Evee (first four photos) was brought in to our shelter as a stray. Upon intake, she was angry and spicy. We used a Feliway towel and draped it over her kennel door. We then moved her to a bigger kennel and offered her a Stretch and Scratch. As you can tell from the pictures, she was pleased to have something to keep her busy! We saw a dramatic change in her behavior and interactions with our staff even just one day after being offered a scratcher. Allowing cats to perform their natural behaviors truly does make them feel more safe and comfortable. Evee has found her forever home, and was sent home with her scratcher.

This grant also assisted a litter of semi-feral kittens! Having something to scratch enables an instinctive behavior in cats, so it can assist feral kittens in their adjustment to indoor, domesticated life. The kittens were skeptical at first, but after one day, they were having a blast with their scratcher — such a blast that we had to offer them a second scratcher. This truly helped the kittens feel more comfortable in their kennels, and with the staff at HSoP. All three kittens have since been adopted into indoor-only homes!

Cowboy Capital Pet Assistance League CCPAL: Disaster Grant
What was the money or product used for?

We used it to repair the plumbing and purchase a new pump to restore water for the rescue.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It allowed us to get warm water for cleaning. It also allowed us to get water out of the faucets. During the storm, we had no water and we had to boil snow for drinking and for cleaning. Once the freeze was over we were able to reroute and use the hose outside, but we had no warm water for cleaning. As soon as the plumber was available, they came and repaired our plumbing and it is now working perfectly.

How many pets did this grant help?

45

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We had a puppy named Ellie who had pneumonia. We had to keep her kennel very clean and give her some very strong medications. She had a severe case, but because of her determination and ours, she made it through the illness.

Having warm, soapy water makes keeping our facility clean easy. It took many more hours when we had to boil and make warm water first. Some things just weren’t as clean during this time.

We are grateful because, just when we thought we could not handle what had happened, we got the email about this much-needed grant. We love you all so very much and cannot thank you enough for all you do for us and for other rescues like us.

This grant couldn’t have come at a more appropriate time. Ellie was special-needs but we found the perfect adopter! Thank you so much; the adopter found her new pup on Petfinder.com and the Petfinder Foundation helped Ellie get through the illness and be adoptable.

A Better Life-Peace Love and Animals: KONG Toy Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Dog entertainment and play

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The toys kept the dogs stimulated and entertained while in their kennels.

How many pets did this grant help?

20+

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Timmy is a mixed-breed pup who is really good at tearing up toys. He loves his Kong and, despite his best efforts, was unable to destroy it. It’s given him hours of enjoyment. He leaves for his forever home next Friday.

Dubois County Humane Society: KONG Toy Grant
What was the money or product used for?

We give each of our dogs at the shelter a peanut butter Kong every afternoon as a treat after outside time.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The dogs in our care look forward to their daily peanut butter Kong.

How many pets did this grant help?

10-15

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We work hard to make shelter life as enjoyable as possible for our animals while they are waiting to find their forever families. This grant helped (and continues to help) all of the dogs in our care, by giving them a daily treat to look forward to.

This grant has been wonderful for Gertrude (first photo), who has been one of our longer residents. Gertrude particularly loves her daily peanut-butter Kong. Daily treats and enrichment make a huge difference in her day-to-day life and make the shelter a happier place for her to be.

Tucker County Animal Shelter: KONG Toy Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Enrichment in the cat area through Kong toys

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Enrichment with toys that the cats could play with and interact with

How many pets did this grant help?

15

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Thelma (first photo) is 16. This gentle, kind kitty came to us after being involved in a hoarding situation. Her owner passed away and she was sent to live with her owner’s sister before she was surrendered. She was stressed at the shelter, but loves her purple Kong toy. She loves to carry it around on her back and will sometimes play with it like a kitten! She is so happy and pleasant, and enjoys all of the attention humans give her. She is spayed, current on core vaccinations, treated for internal and external parasites, microchipped, and ready to be adopted. We are holding out hope that her forever family is on its way! Meet Thelma here.

Heart of Idaho Animal Sanctuary: Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The money was used to buy an assortment of new dog toys and a heavy-duty tether-ball set for use in one of our outdoor play areas.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The items purchased are very helpful in keeping the dogs busy and entertained. As you can see from the pictures of Moose and the tetherball (bottom two photos), it helps them use up excess energy and get some exercise. The dogs also like toys for security, just as kids do. We often send them home with the dogs when they are adopted and so need to continually replenish the supply. It was very helpful to have you help with this expense.

How many pets did this grant help?

14 so far and more to come: We were able to buy 40 toys and the tetherball.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Scotty (first three photos) and Hansen (photos 4 through 7) were brought to us by a rescue group from Utah, where they were due to be euthanized the next day. Scotty is about 6 years old and probably no longer up to herding cattle full-time. He is a gentle dog who loves people and has decided his new squirrel toy will be his new companion. Hansen, who is about 1.5 years old, is a strong, high-energy dog who was enjoying chasing the rope toy and playing tug of war with it. He will probably like tetherball once we can get it away from Moose (one of our boarders). We don’t know much about Hansen’s story, but both he and Scotty are still looking for good homes and will make wonderful pets.

Meet Scotty here.
Meet Hansen here.

Humane Society for Animals, Inc.: Senior Pet Adoption Grants
What was the money or product used for?

This grant money is being used for medications we have ordered for Nanna. Our organization is purchasing the medications as prescribed by the veterinarian we use. We will give these to the adopters when Nanna is adopted.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We take our pets to the veterinarian and have shots, evaluations, surgeries, and medications for animals so they are in an adoptable condition to lessen the burden on adopters. Assistance for these costs helps our nonprofit and all the animals in our care.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Nanna is such a sweet-natured girl and a family is very interested in her. They have been to the shelter four times to visit her. The family is struggling right now (their son has two broken arms), but they hope to be able to take Nanna into their home soon. She is still on Petfinder here.

Nanna was found abandoned in Siloam Springs, AR, on Feb. 22, 2021. We have had her in our care for more than two months. After years of neglect and a poor diet, she has tremendous skin problems. We have been treating her with steroids, Bravecto, antifungal medications, and antibiotics. She gets baths two times weekly for the oily skin and is on a good diet of Blue Buffalo Senior Formula.

She has improved somewhat, but her treatments will continue for a long time due to her age and the severity of her condition. She possibly had an autoimmune disorder for many years before coming to our shelter. It is estimated that the treatments will continue for the remainder of her life. We will use grant funds to subsidize medication and feeding costs for Nanna for four months. This will go to her adopter. Nanna’s costs for medications and feeding are $2967.48 per year.

We have looked into the solemn face that was gazing up at us and felt something very special about this canine, a pervasive feeling of peacefulness and tranquil acceptance. Together, we walked to the bark park where the shepherd’s story was revealed. Her fur was disheveled and her skin wrinkled, but even though her eyes looked sad, she shared the elation of life with the joyful expression of spirit that is the gift of the canines.

This 8-year-old quickly received her name, Nanna, which matches her life experience and her friendly, nurturing energies that are mirrored in the gentle swish, swish of her happy tail wag. She has been through some tough times and has suffered neglect and abandonment, but Nanna has an amazing desire to be with her humans and, when called, will come running to you with a bounce in her step.

She walks easily on-leash, performs an instant “sit” on request, and impressed the photographer with her alert, focused nature. Nanna is hoping for a home with a kind, caring human who can accept her wrinkled skin, slender body, and thinning fur and who can look beyond the superficial and see directly into the loving heart of a calm, senior canine.

Outcast Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

For baby Marshall’s medical expenses

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant enabled us to pay the balance from his emergency care, which required amputation surgery and hospitalization afterwards.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Marshall was just a 6-week-old pup when his owner surrendered him to the SPCA with a severely swollen leg that had been left untreated. Marshall’s leg was shattered, requiring emergency surgery to remove it. Because he had been an “only child” and was taken away from his mom too soon, we knew he needed a special home with another dog to show him the ropes. Marshall recovered and went to foster where there were other dogs in the home. Marshall was just adopted after 10 weeks in our care.