Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

Melissa's Second Chances: P.L.A.Y. Pet Beds
What was the money or product used for?

The pet beds were used in and out of kennels for dogs housed in the rescue.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We love these pet beds and the dogs love them too! We prefer to have our dogs in foster homes, but sometimes we can’t immediately find them a foster and they stay in the rescue. When they are staying at the rescue, our goal is to provide our dogs with a low-stress and comfortable environment. The P.L.A.Y. beds are soft and comfortable and hold up to multiple washings. This allows us to reuse the beds as new dogs come in to the rescue.

How many pets did this grant help?

We took in 140 dogs in the month of April and at any point in time had 8-15 dogs housed in the rescue. May and June have been busy months, as well!

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Haddie, a Yorkie mix (first three photos), loved to hang out with the girls in the office. These photos were taken right before she met her new forever family — you can see how excited she was to meet them. Her new family, with three young children, fell in love with her spunky personality and came back the following day to adopt her.

Margo, a Chihuahua mix (fourth and fifth photos), is one of our newer residents. While she looks serious in her photos, she has a bubbly personality and zest for life. She met her new family today and will get to go home with them as soon as she is spayed. She can’t wait!

Second Chance Dogs: COVID-19 Operation Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Spay and neuter

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

During COVID-19, we were unable to host fundraisinig events. This grant was very much appreciated by our organization and our four-legged furry friends and helped us pay for one spay and one neuter.

How many pets did this grant help?

2

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Sophie (first photo) was in a box at Walmart and was being given away as a 7-week-old puppy. Two teenage girls took the puppy home and the mother said no. The puppy was passed on to someone else who knew of our rescue. She gave us the puppy. Someone adopted Sophie and kept her for four or five months when the landlord went to do a repair and did not allow animals. She had to get rid of the puppy. Due to the clause in our contract, the lady returned the puppy to us and filled out our surrender forms. The puppy was eventually adopted.

Hank (second photo) was being given away for free on Facebook. We contacted the owner and they agreed to surrender their dog. When dogs are given away, you never know who is going to get them and what plans they have for the dog.

Cherished Tails Senior Sanctuary: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

We utilized the funds to provide follow-up care for Faust, who was ehrlichia-positive and severely anemic. He was diagnosed with hypoalbuminemia resulting in early renal disease, likely as a result of starvation and the other conditions.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Faust received additional diagnostics (bloodwork and ultrasound) to determine if the condition was treatable (it was!). The food changes and meds are improving his condition dramatically and he was well enough to get neutered about six weeks ago

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Faust came to us from the shelter as an urgent medical case due to his severe and life-threatening condition. He was bloated despite being extremely emaciated (he received a Body Condition Score of 1 out of 9) because his kidneys were not functioning properly. He initially had a very guarded prognosis from our vet, but we felt that he needed a chance at whatever life he could have.

We aggressively treated each condition identified, and a few weeks after Faust came into rescue, we could see that there might be hope as he was gaining weight, the bloat was decreasing gradually, and his energy had increased. We could see him transforming into a “normal” puppy right before our eyes. He started playing and seeking out attention and affection from his medical foster. We knew at this point that he was going to survive, but it was still uncertain how much permanent damage had been done.

Fast forward two months. We moved him to one of our longer-term fosters and continued his food and medication protocol. We were so pleased that his numbers just continued to improve. In April, he was healthy enough to get neutered and came through surgery like a champ. In May he was adopted by his second foster and became a permanent member of the family, and is spending the summer in Colorado living the dream. Their vet is optimistic that he will recover completely and will live a long and happy life.

L.A.S.S.I. (aka Oceana County Animal Shelter): KONG Toy Grant
What was the money or product used for?

While the dogs are staying at the shelter and awaiting their new furever homes, the Kongs were invaluable in keeping them from getting bored. They loved them.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

One dog in particular was at the shelter for more than a year and just recently got adopted. She is a strong girl and destroyed most toys, but not the Kongs — she loved them, especially filled with treats. She would carry one around with her like a baby, probably so no other dog could get it.

How many pets did this grant help?

10

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Calamity Jane was a 2-year-old pit/boxer who arrived at the shelter with her sister, Annie. They were both at the shelter for more than a year and no one had any interest in adopting them. They were both strong dogs and needed the right family.

Happily they both were recently adopted to great families who understood their needs. The Kong toys were invaluable in helping Jane and her sister Annie stay well-adjusted as they awaited their forever homes. Both sisters are very high-energy, large and very strong dogs. They destroy most toys immediately.

Patuxent Animal Welfare Society Inc. (PAWS): COVID-19 Operation Grant
What was the money or product used for?

$94.20: kitten milk powder, kitten dry food, variety of canned food
$64.08: PetAg milk replacer powder and NutriVet dry kitten food
$15.89: dry kitten food
Spray/neuter at clinic for kittens Frick and Frack – $35 (male), $50 (female)

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

With the reduction of donations and limited ability to promote adoptions, we have been able to continue our fostering efforts with the purchase of food and medical supplies. We so greatly appreciate the grants that are available to help keep our organization running. Our mission continues to be the rescue of cats in need of homes. We will resume our educational tasks when possible. We have placed a thank-you to the Petfinder Foundation at our three Petco locations and the Calvert Well Pet Clinic. We are also posting on our Facebook page.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant was able to help five cats. Uploaded are a few pictures of cats who have been in our care or have been adopted.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Our little Russian blue (first photo) came in. We were able to provide for his medical needs such as vaccines and neutering. He was fostered for six weeks. We posted him on Petfinder and were pleasantly surprised with a quick application. Jeff has given him a furever home and has let us know that everyone is doing fine and they are so happy with their new kitten.

City of Bloomington Animal Care and Control: Dog Field Trips/Short-Term Fostering Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Supplies to support our Slumber Buddies program and its launch

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It allowed us to provide a standard experience and allocate staff time to the program, making it successful.

How many pets did this grant help?

22 so far

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

The Slumber Buddies program came about at the beginning of 2020. We had enormous community interest and were able to get to know the animals in our program a little better through short-term fostering, and could find them better adoptive matches because of it. Echo is a 2-year-old Lab mix who came to the shelter very under-socialized. She was fearful in the kennel and we did not know much about her personality. She was sent into a short-term foster with a wonderful young lady who was unable to adopt or foster long-term, but loves dogs. We learned a lot of cute facts about Echo in the foster home that helped her connect to her adoptive family. We learned her favorite treats, that she loved to cuddle up in bed, and that she was a super quick learner of tricks! Echo gained confidence and was able to hold on to that when she came back to the shelter, where the kennel wasn’t so scary any more. Echo was adopted and has been happily loving her new family for more than three months now.

Frankie's Friends Cat Rescue, Inc.: COVID-19 Operation Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The money was used to spay/neuter, vaccinate, test, deworm, and flea-treat 25 cats and kittens who were recently surrendered to our facility. It also allowed us to provide medical treatment for these cats where it was needed. This cost approximately $400.
The remaining $350 was used to purchase food and litter for the cats being housed at our facility and waiting for adoption.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The money allowed us to continue our mission and take in injured and sick cats and kittens whom we otherwise would not have been able to help. They were provided with much-needed medical care, food, and litter and will now be ready to enter loving homes. We did not have to pull money from other places to continue to care for cats that we already had in-house, and thus we were able to continue with our regular intake process.

How many pets did this grant help?

50+

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

A lady contacted us about nine sick female kittens who were living in a box under someone’s porch (first photo). The homeowner was unable to care for the kittens and therefore they were left to fend for themselves. We were able to take them into our facility (second photo) and provide them with medical care and food that they needed until they were big enough to be spayed. Among these kittens was little Cora (third and fourth photos), who was fixed last week and adopted into a loving home two days after (fifth photo). Had she and her sisters not been brought to our facility, they likely would not have survived through the illness that they had while outdoors.

PAWS Atlanta, Inc.: COVID-19 Operation Grant
What was the money or product used for?

PAWS Atlanta received a $1,000 COVID Operations Grant from the Petfinder Foundation. We are incredibly grateful! We used our grant for two purposes. First, we spent $250 on additional cleaning supplies that helped us get through our ramped-up period where we were taking extra precautions and updating our safety protocols at the shelter due to COVID-19. This included items like paper towels, hand sanitizer, disinfectant, etc.

Second, we spent $750 to purchase medications for our pets in foster care during the shutdown. We placed an additional 36 cats and 74 dogs into foster care during the month of March and that meant many dogs and cats needed our assistance in their new foster homes. Even with the financial burdens we faced, it was imperative to make sure those pets in foster care were receiving the best medical care.

The $750 ($753.06 total below) was used for medicine for the following pets:
-Booger Bear (canine): three rounds of Diroban/melarsomine injections to treat heartworm disease and 28 days’ worth of Doxycycline at $219.81
-Penny (canine): Amantadine HCI capsule 100 at $92.88
-Coby (canine): Theophylline SR capsule 60 capsules at $58.32 and Gabapentin minitab 100 tablets at $66.96
-Tinsel (feline): Prednisolone ClickDose Transdermal 60 clicks at $51.79
-Spirit (canine): Gabapentin 60 capsules at $53.78 and Ursodial at $91.68
-Fireman Aaron (canine): Flurbiprofen 5 bottles x 22.08 at $110.40
-Elecktra (canine): Fluoxetine 20 mg 100 tablets at $7.44

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

As of June 15, 2020, we had 55 dogs and 27 cats we were caring for at our shelter, along with 36 dogs and 61 cats being cared for by our foster families. Our top priorities continue to be to care for the animals who are at our shelter and to ensure that our animals in foster homes are also being cared for and loved during this time.

We are putting a heavy focus on converting new foster placements into forever adoptions and believe this is critical in making a substantial impact on our shelter numbers (with a potential spike anticipated after things begin to normalize). This grant was a wonderful gift to our organization and so very much appreciated. During the shutdown, and as we slowly resume and rebuild our efforts, being able to purchase additional cleaning supplies has been particularly helpful to protect the safety of our staff, as well as members of our community and our animals.

Grant funding to allocate to medicine for our pets in foster care came at a critical time for our organization as we, like other shelters around the country, have faced financial difficulties with the loss of so many predictable revenue streams during the shutdown. And, of course, grant funding to purchase medicine for our pets in foster care made a direct impact on their lives. It is important to have our pets healthy, happy, and ready to be adopted into their forever homes. It also means it serves other animals because as space opens, more at-risk dogs and cats can be helped. The Petfinder Foundation made this possible.

How many pets did this grant help?

89

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Funding from the Petfinder Foundation made a big difference in the life of Booger Bear (a.k.a. Boo Bear), who was treated for heartworm disease. Booger Bear was a scared dog who was abandoned near PAWS Atlanta and had to be trapped. Well, she is scared no more and this gal is personality plus! Her foster family took her and their dog Moomoo on “field trips” so their worlds did not get too small during the quarantine. Their favorite spot: the Decatur Cemetery, which you would have thought was Disney World in Booger Bear’s mind. She also loves to gather up all her toys and bring them into bed with her for a nap. She especially adores her squeaky toys.

Booger Bear was adopted by her foster family’s dog walker on June 1. They had met her before she was adoptable and fell in love. She has a doggie sister and is settling in well and she and her doggie sister are doing great together. She is also doing fantastic with her heartworm treatments and we will finish up treatment with the adopter (at our expense). Soon, she will be feeling better than she has in a long time thanks to the Petfinder Foundation!

Six Kittens Rescue: COVID-19 Operation Grant
What was the money or product used for?

We received a $250 COVID relief grant. This money directly went towards the cost of first vet exams, feline leukemia/FIV screens, and first vaccines for a litter of five kittens: Storm, Thunder, Lightning, Snow, and Rain.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This helped our organization because it greatly helped to reduce the financial burden of caring for so many kittens during COVID. We have seen donations decline significantly during the pandemic, which has made our organization financially strapped.

How many pets did this grant help?

5

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

All five kittens were listed as adoptable after their first vet visit. Lightning (first and second photos) is an all-black kitten, but has some significantly crossed eyes. We received an inquiry from a family of six about adopting Lightning. The youngest daughter also suffers from severely crossed eyes and has to wear special glasses to help her see. When she saw Lightning’s picture, she told her mom that she was so excited for the opportunity to have a kitten that is just like her! It touched all of our hearts as we aren’t just here to help the kittens. We are also helping families become whole!

NMDOG: COVID-19 Operation Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The Petfinder Foundation 2020 COVID-19 Operation Grant grant was used to provide heartworm and flea/tick preventative medications for our dogs in boarding (six dogs: Twix, Rayden, Seabiscuit, B-Line, Kenzie, Hashbrown), in foster care (nine dogs: Nevis, Neyo, Jack, Delta Dawn, Savvy, Lobo, Haven, Little Lilly, and Blossom), and in our long-term Home Sanctuary program (ten dogs: Honor, Astro, Baxter Cape, Raina, Goldie, Pinto, Sterling, Dukey, Micah, and Lance Sweets), for the month of April 2020.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The 2020 COVID19 Operation Grant allowed us to continue to provide excellent care to our dogs: first, paying for heartworm and flea/tick preventative for one month for 25 dogs. Additionally, since our preventatives were taken care of for a month, this grant allowed NMDOG to use operational funds towards the expense of isolation-boarding for a new intake, Fauci.

How many pets did this grant help?

25

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This grant allowed NMDOG to use operational funds towards the expense of isolation-boarding for a new intake, Fauci (first photo), an elderly American bulldog with sarcoptic mange. Fauci is a victim of animal cruelty (charges were filed against the owner), and was near death when he was surrendered to NMDOG. After discharge from the vet he required a sterile, isolated kennel, which was provided by a partner shelter. Fast forward to June 2020, and sweet Fauci is now at our NMDOG HQ and recovering well!

B-Line (second photo) was unchained in January 2020. He is a 1-year-old heeler mix and he has a ton of energy! B-Line is a very fun-loving, excitable boy with a heart of gold. He is very smart! B-Line is currently in boarding and goes on regular outings with an NMDOG volunteer. B-Line is available for foster and/or adoption.
Meet B-Line here.

Rayden (third photo) is almost 2 years old and he is one of the sweetest, silliest, most joyful huskies you will ever meet! You wouldn’t have known that when we first met Rayden a few months ago, because Rayden’s spirit was broken. He was starved emotionally, mentally and physically. He weighed only 28 lbs. the day he was removed from his chain. Today, Rayden weighs at least 45 lbs. and he has received a full medical and behavioral clearance for adoption. NMDOG has promised to love and treasure Rayden, providing for all of his needs and to find the perfect husky home to keep him safe and make all of his dreams come true. We don’t take these promises lightly — that is why we work so hard and sometimes wait so long until the *right* home is found. “Rescue is not about finding a dog a home. Rescue is about finding a dog a great home.”
Meet Rayden here.

Hashbrown (fourth photo) came to NMDOG in early 2019 as the result of a domestic-violence situation. Hashbrown loves to play fetch and splash in the kiddie pool. He likes other dogs, but NMDOG is looking for a home where Hashbrown can be the only pet in the home, so he can enjoy the full attention of a loving family. Meet Hashbrown here.