Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

Underdog Animal Rescue and Rehab: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The $1,000 grant was used to help pay for medical bills at Mill Creek Animal Hospital in Moab, Utah, for our rescue dog Risotto, who had to undergo two surgeries to repair his broken hip, broken tibial plateau, and shattered ankle.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Risotto was found on the side of the highway with two broken back legs, unable to walk. Our rescue took him straight to the vet, where we racked up some pretty big bills repairing his extensive injuries. This grant helped us to cover some of the costs of Risotto’s medical bills in a timely manner. We are always in need of emergency medical funding, and the Petfinder Foundation came through to help us save the life of this sweet dog, who is now happy and healed with his forever family.

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Kathy, a steadfast Underdog volunteer and longtime supporter of reservation animals, was on her way to pick up an abandoned litter of nine puppies at a water well when she found Risotto sitting on the side of the road. Kathy pulled over and approached him, knowing something was wrong. She tried to get him into her car, but he couldn’t walk. That’s when she realized he couldn’t use his back legs at all. Through sheer strength of will, Kathy picked him up and loaded him into her car, then picked up the other 14 abandoned dogs that were her goal and drove them several hours to Underdog Rescue and Rehab in Moab, UT.

Risotto was taken immediately to the emergency vet. He spent the following six nights in the hospital, first being stabilized and watched for internal injuries since he had large amounts of blood in his urine. When he was stable, he underwent two surgeries for a broken hip, a broken tibial plateau, and a shattered ankle (he was neutered at the same time). He was in intensive care for three nights.

Through all of this, Risotto never showed one bit of aggression or unhappiness. He is a sweet, affectionate boy whom we feel fortunate to have been able to help.

Risotto spent about a month recovering in foster care before finding his forever home. He is now living his best life with his family here in Moab, Utah, and while he is still building up strength in his back end, his vet expects him to make a full recovery.

South Suburban Humane Society: COVID-19 Operation Grant
What was the money or product used for?

We are incredibly grateful for our COVID-19 relief grant. The grant was utilized to support our pet-food bank for needy pet owners and for supplies for our foster program.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

COVID-19 and the pandemic were a shock to animal-welfare organizations everywhere. We had no idea how donors, adopters, and fosters might react and we were terrified of the potential outcomes for our organization. Grants like the one from the Petfinder Foundation allowed us to breathe a small sigh of relief as we turned our attention to helping our communities and getting pets out into foster homes. It was a tremendous gift to buy additional supplies for new fosters and to ensure we had adequate supplies to give to needy pet parents.

How many pets did this grant help?

1600

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Navy Pier had lived with South Suburban Humane Society for almost exactly two years. As a special-needs dog, she had few inquiries for foster or adoption, but staff and volunteers were committed to keeping her safe, healthy and happy. During the pandemic, the attention that the public turned towards fostering drew a pair of roommates to SSHS to foster. We supplied them with a crate and supplies through this grant. They helped market Navy Pier with amazing photos of her visiting the lake (second photo) and taking long walks. The profile attracted this adopter and she was adopted! What a celebration we had!

From Facebook, May 14: “I can’t believe I’m sitting here typing to you that Navy Pier is adopted! Navy was rescued two years ago by Chicago Heights Animal Control from an alleged breeding and dog-fighting operation. She has lived with us for two years, waiting for the perfect home.

“Our friends at One Tail at a Time shared a list of interested fosters with us at the beginning of the pandemic and we were able to get Navy into a foster home. The lovely people pictured (third photo, with Navy’s adopter in the blue jacket) have loved on Navy and learned so much more about her in a home. Their fostering brought her to today when this extraordinary guy adopted her. He’s an Army veteran who told us he’s been lonely and needed a companion. They are the perfect pair.

“No one on our staff has a dry eye right now. We are so grateful, so joyful, and so hopeful that Navy’s story shows that fostering saves lives and collaboration saves lives.”

Felines & Canines: COVID-19 Operation Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The donation we received from the Petfinder Foundation afforded us the resources needed to help purchase vaccinations for the surplus of dogs entering our program during the Covid crisis.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It ensured we were able to purchase critical vaccinations as well as keep our dogs safe from deadly viruses.

How many pets did this grant help?

250

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Our sweet boy Ace received all of the medical care needed to be a healthy, happy pup who was promptly adopted by his new best friend! From Facebook: “Male, about 1 year old and about 8 lbs. Ace is your typical Chihuahua mix — nervous at first and then can’t quit snuggling and kissing you two seconds later. He is such a fun, spunky boy with the best personality. He loves to play with other dogs and has quickly learned to walk well on leash. He’d love to go to a home where he can be snuggled and loved on all day, and curl up in bed with you at night for a good night’s sleep. Because of his size and breed, we’re looking for a home without young children.”

Humane Society of Northwest Louisiana: Purina Adoption Grant
What was the money or product used for?

We reduced/eliminated adoption fees for active-duty military adopters.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We are located near a military base and we often have military adopters. These are hardworking young men and women who often do not make a lot of money and make a huge sacrifice for our country. Many had family pets that they dearly miss and want pets of their own. Thanks to your grant, we made this happen!

How many pets did this grant help?

4

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Wrigley came into our care in February 2020. This poor pup was in terrible shape: deaf, blind in one eye, heartworm-positive, and with such a severe flea infestation that he lost some of his fur permanently. The one eye in which he still had vision was getting worse. Still, he was the most loving pup you could imagine. He completed heartworm treatment, was neutered, had one eye removed, and got his ear infections cleared up. We also fattened him up. He is now thriving with his forever family.

The Humane Society of McCormick County, Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Suki was found with a very painful condition known as cherry eyes. We could see that she had scratched at her eyes and her eyes were constantly tearing up. Left untreated, cherry eye causes infections and dry eye, which can lead to blindness.

The surgeon recommended that they create pockets for those inflamed eyelids in an effort to avoid a dry-eye condition that can occur with the traditional method of treating cherry eyes. Because Suki was miserable, we went ahead with the surgery in hopes that the Petfinder Foundation could help us with the cost. The charge was $250 for the surgery on both eyes and $100 for the anesthesia, for a total of $350.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We have already picked up several dogs with broken legs that needed surgery and emergency care this year. With cancelled fundraisers and our resale store being closed due to COVID, we didn’t know how we were going to give Suki the care she needed. We were so grateful that the Petfinder Foundation was able to help Suki.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

A volunteer’s dogs started barking and when the volunteer looked outside, Suki was on her doorstep. She had been dropped off without an explanation. Suki was just 6 months old and in terrible shape. Both eyes had a condition known as cherry eye, as well as eye infections. She was also missing most of her hair from scratching it off because of demodex mange.

With her immune system compromised like this, she was miserable, but she was still friendly and a little shy. The volunteer kept her overnight, gave her a bath, and brought her to the shelter the next day.

We immediately took her to a surgeon to have her eyes looked at and to draw up a plan for treatment. She was given Simplicef antibiotic for her skin infections and given her first set of vaccinations and a rabies shot.

Different methods were considered to correct the condition cherry eye, but Dr. Covar recommended that they create a pocket for that eyelid. The old method is to remove the eyelid, and although this method is less expensive, it can lead to dry eye and, since she had such bad infections, we didn’t want to risk her having any more complications.

Surgery was scheduled for a week later on July 28. Suki went back to the surgeon to have her eyes checked on Aug. 4, 6, and 18. She also received her second set of vaccinations and was spayed.

Suki immediately started to feel better. We work with a great rescue in Connecticut and, when she was healed up, she was transferred to Save a Life Dog Rescue. Suki is in a foster home and doing great. The family loves her and we are hopeful that she will find a forever home soon.

Guardian Angels Cat Rescue and Adoption Shelter: Purina Adoption Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The $1,000 grant allowed us to offer reduced adoption fees when two kittens were adopted together. We advocate for kittens to be adopted in pairs for several health and adjustment benefits. Our standard adoption fee is $50 per kitten. The grant gave 25 families the opportunity to adopt two for $60. Our “2-4-60” campaign is making double adoptions affordable.

To date, we have adopted 20 pairs of kittens and will offer 2-4-60 to five more families by the end of November.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We had an overwhelming kitten season. Since the starting date of the grant, Aug. 1, 2020, we have accepted 75 kittens for foster care and adoption. Since the beginning of the year, 266 cats have been surrendered. The majority of these were stray kittens or abandoned litters, with or without their mothers. By reducing the shelter population at double the rate of adoptions through the 2-4-60 program, we have been able to keep a manageable census and provide high-quality care to all.

How many pets did this grant help?

50

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Mark is a 7-year-old black cat who was rescued as a stray and has lived at the shelter for half his life. A while back, he wasn’t feeling well and he spent some time in our medical room.

Baby is a 1-year-old female tabby who came to us as a kitten and hid for most of her first year in the kitten room. None of our volunteers were able to coax her out of her hiding hole. Then Mark came along, joining a new room after his stay in the infirmary.

When Baby met Mark, her life changed. She felt secure with him and snuggled up to him every day. Mark loves to be petted, and soon Baby was accepting affection too. They were inseparable (first photo).

Yesterday, Brian wanted to adopt Mark, and when he learned about Mark’s bond with Baby, he opened his home and heart to her, too.
Mark and Baby were adopted together and can now live happily ever after in their new home.

Although this wasn’t a 2-4-60 “kitten” adoption, the offer was made for this bonded pair and opened the door for the double adoption and a happily-ever-after love story.

Adopt-A-Dog, Inc.: Purina Adoption Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The money was used to offset the adoption fees for two adult dogs in the month of March.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped my organization and the pets in our care by bringing attention to the benefits of adoption as well as helping to make the adoption of two of our dogs possible.

How many pets did this grant help?

2

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Helga (first photo), a hound, came to us when a local woman reached out for help. The woman had Helga and many other animals living in a trailer and Helga needed to get adopted. We took Helga in and estimated her to be around 7 years old. This grant helped Helga get adopted during the height of the pandemic (second photo).

Ruff Start Rescue: Senior Pet Adoption Grants
What was the money or product used for?

Funds were used to support the post-adoption care of Tinkerbelle for the first year with her new family. Funding was used to cover Tinkerbelle’s adoption fee, supplies to cover the care of her diabetes (syringes, insulin, glucose meter, test strips, and bi-annual vet visits), specialized food, and seizure medication.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped our senior rescue dog, Tinkerbelle, find her forever family, and made her ongoing care more financially manageable.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Tinkerbelle was found on the streets of Houston, TX. She was brought to a shelter and was transferred to Ruff Start Rescue in Minnesota. Upon arriving in Minnesota, it was clear Tinkerbelle was not well. She had diabetes and a urinary-tract infection.

With proper medication, Tinkerbelle’s infection cleared up and her diabetes has remained stable. While in the care of the rescue, she also began having seizures. Daily medication was prescribed to manage her seizures, which has provided a significant decrease in symptoms.

From her adoptive family: “Tinkerbelle is doing pretty good. She has had a few seizures, but I have her on a medication called Zonisamide capsules twice a day. I use diapers and potty pads with her diabetes, as she pees a lot. I have started her on a fish-based food I heard was good for diabetes. She has a brother and a sister (the furry kind) in our home. They get along fairly well. Tinkerbelle has some blindness and I have to put a gate on the stairs so she won’t fall down.”

We are so grateful for the support of the Petfinder Foundation to help Tinkerbelle find her forever family. She is now living out her final years with a safe and loving family that is committed to her ongoing care.

Brindlee Mountain Animal Rescue: COVID-19 Operation Grant
What was the money or product used for?

We used the funds to purchase much-needed vaccines that allow us to vaccinate upon intake. We also were able to replenish our dewormer and flea pills.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It allowed us to give vaccines upon intake and lower the likelihood of diseases spreading to other animals.

How many pets did this grant help?

150-200

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We took in a litter of puppies from our local shelter. We were able to worm and vaccinate each one. The smallest was named Izzy. He was adopted by a single mom and her daughter who had wanted a dog for over a year.

Scott County Humane Society: Purina Adoption Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Use to pay vet bills for adult cats who were adopted for a reduced fee of $10. The grant funds went to pay for spay/neuter and vaccinations.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It helped us boost adoptions for 13 adult cats in our care, who are more difficult to place during kitten season as there are so many cute kittens available for adoption. Nine of the cats adopted were female and three were male. Five of the females were mom cats who were spayed and adopted after their kittens were weaned. One of the male cats was FIV-positive. Another male cat name Dude was recovering from chemical burns on his back.

How many pets did this grant help?

13

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Pocahontas came into our care from the local shelter on May 5, 2020, as she was very pregnant. Five days later, she gave birth to six kittens. She then broke with ringworm and coccidia and all six kittens developed both conditions. With lots of TLC, all the kittens survived and after several months in our care, Pocahontas and all the kittens were eventually cleared of both ringworm and coccidia. While the kittens were then quickly adopted, Pocahantas was on the shy side and and still had not been adopted by Oct. 1. With the $10 adoption fee, she finally found her forever home and was adopted on Oct. 10.