Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

ARF-Texas rescue: Purina One Senior Pet Adoption Assistance Grant
What was the money or product used for?

This grant was used for the medical needs and dietary needs of Arbor.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Without this grant, we would not have been able to adequately provide the medication and food that this dog needs daily for her condition.

How many pets did this grant help?

Just one

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Arbor came to us severely malnourished and suffering from severe skin and gastrointestinal issues. After extensive blood work and tests, it was determined that she would need to be on medication and special food for the rest of her life. With this grant, we were able to make sure she was adopted and provided with the care she needs.

Humane Society of Southern Wisconsin: Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

We used the funds provided to us by the Petfinder Foundation 2019 Orvis Animal Care Grant to purchase dog enrichment supplies for our in-shelter dogs. Specifically, we purchased Adaptil calming aids, several different sizes of Kong toys, various different designs of treat/kibble-dispensing rocker-ball toys, several different varieties of Jolly Ball toys, and durable Nylabone chews.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped our organization by allowing us to purchase much-needed dog enrichment supplies at a time when our budget was far more than tight. It helped the pets in our care by providing the tools we needed to give our sheltered dogs the mental and physical exercise they need.

How many pets did this grant help?

150

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

He-Man was directly helped by this grant. He was with us much longer than most dogs. Most dogs spend just about eight days with us, but He-Man spent two months — over seven times the average time a dog spends waiting to go home at our facility! Because of this extra time spent in a kennel environment, He-Man had a big need for both physical and mental exercise. The Petfinder Foundation 2019 Orvis Animal Care Grant provided us with the funds that we needed to be able to meet those needs for him. He received daily enrichment during his time with us and thus was able to remain physically and mentally well during his extended stay until he was adopted by a wonderful, loving family.

Lee County Humane Society: Dogs Playing for Life Mentorship Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The grant money was used for a DPFL Mentorship seminar in Austin, TX, at Austin Pets Alive!

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped our organization because I was able to bring back the knowledge I gained and share it with the rest of the staff members at our facility. Since attending the DPFL mentorship, we have been able to get some of our testier dogs back into playgroups and have also began implementing kennel routines with all the dogs here at our shelter.

How many pets did this grant help?

300

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

One specific dog whom this grant has helped would be Teddy. Teddy was surrendered to our shelter in October 2019 and, due to his being unsocialized and having some dog aggression, he was a harder-to-adopt dog. With the knowledge I gained at the mentorship, we were able to get Teddy back into playgroups with a muzzle and help him gain some socialization, and we were able to learn more about his personality. The result of this was that Teddy was able to go to a rescue partner up North and is now not at risk of being euthanized!

MCPAWS Regional Animal Shelter: Cat Enrichment
What was the money or product used for?

Grant funds were used to purchase a year supply of Comfort Zone Cat Calming Diffuser Kit and Stretch and Scratch pads for cat kennels. These items will help enrich the lives of the cats here at MCPAWS.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant has helped pets in our care by providing each cat its own scratch pad and calm scent to keep them healthy and happy while they wait to find forever homes.

How many pets did this grant help?

370+

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Zac has been loving his scratch pad! He is currently in a kennel in the front lobby at the shelter and has really been coming out of his shell. He is more playful and outgoing than ever before! He has not yet been adopted, but we know his day is coming soon! Meet Zac here.

San Nicola Dog Rescue: P.L.A.Y. Pet Beds
What was the money or product used for?

We received a grant of P.L.A.Y. beds for dogs. We are so grateful!

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

These beds save us so much time washing them. Dogs love them; they are soft and cozy AND they can be washed in the washer, which is so important when you have a lot of dogs and a lot of beds. Not only do they fit in the washer, but also they are stitched across several times and don’t tear or get clumpy.

How many pets did this grant help?

58 over a year

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Kona, a Lab/shepherd mix (first photo), had hip dysphasia surgery and spent a lot of time lying down during recovery. He kept choosing his P.L.A.Y. bed over other beds. I think it was because the P.L.A.Y. bed provides the right balance of softness and firmness — it doesn’t sag and doesn’t get clumpy; it’s like a firm mattress. Kona is awaiting surgery on his other hip and we hope to find him a home after that. Probably we’ll have to send a P.L.A.Y. bed with him 🙂

The second photo shows Kayla (the cattle dog), trying to fit with Gris in the same bed. Kayla has been adopted.

Ramapo-Bergen Animal Refuge Inc: Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

To purchase agility equipment, including: Rubber Surface Dog Agility A-Frame, 9′ Ramps 42″ Wide. 7′ Ramps 36″ Wide, Dog Agility Equipment Mini A-Frame / A Frame / AFrame, Dog Agility Hurdle Cone Set, 8 agility cones, 4 agility rods, The KLIMB Dog Training, Platform and Agility System and Octagon Hoop Jump.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Play time and agility training are led by our in-house, certified dog trainer in conjunction with the dog kennel managers. All dogs receive on-site training with our staff, and many receive off-site training as well. There is a need for all of our dogs to have regular exercise and stimulation beyond just walks and free time in one of our three fenced-in play areas. With our newly renovated, larger play yard, complete with AstroTurf, we are introducing agility training. We have purchased agility equipment with provided funding, and the dogs are learning so much and enjoying the agility experience.

How many pets did this grant help?

50 dogs a month

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Have you ever seen anything more heartwarming than rescued dogs letting go of the past and playing freely in the sunshine? Exercising their minds as they prepare for new lives? RBARI’s rescued dogs now have a brand new, safe and beautiful place to run and exercise without restrictions. It is because of your support that we can make such beautiful improvements for our four-legged friends. And, most importantly, renovations such as our new play yard, fully equipped with agility equipment, improve the quality of life for rescued dogs residing at our shelter until they find their forever homes.

Our new agility equipment allows our dogs extra play and training to help them decompress, play, train, meet potential adopters and participate in play groups and enrichment activities. Freedom, sunshine and outdoor play are so important to the well-being of our rescued dogs.

Max is a cute little Shiba Inu mix looking for the right understanding person. Agility classes and the equipment provided by a generous Petfinder Foundation grant have given Max the confidence he needed to begin to bond with new people. Not only does Max have fun, but he gets his nervous energy out and makes friends. Max gets along with most other dogs, particularly when they are exercising together. He is a sweet, loyal little dog with the people he chooses to trust. He shows the independent intelligence of a Shiba, so agility training has been key to preparing Max for a new home and de-stressing him during his stay at the shelter. A tired dog is a happy dog, and agility training have done just that for Max!

LifeLine Animal Project: Grant Opportunities from the Petfinder Foundation
What was the money or product used for?

At LifeLine’s DeKalb County Animal Services, we used the emergency foster-kit grant money to buy supplies for our individual dog-foster kits. A large portion of this money was used to purchase crates, of which we are perpetually in need, as well as flea/tick preventatives, martingale collars, Kongs and seat-belt harnesses. We also put the money toward other supplies, including “Adopt Me” collars, harnesses, and leashes. Several of these foster kits were used during our Home for the Pawlidays program, where fosters sign up to take a dog home for the week of Thanksgiving.

At LifeLine’s Fulton County Animal Services, the grant money provided crates, collars, leashes, harnesses, toys and other basic supplies to allow fosters to take and safely foster an animal in need. Prior to the grant, we literally had no crates at FCAS with which to send out medium to large dogs. Lack of supportive supplies is always a hindrance to recruiting new fosters and getting them to commit to caring for an animal outside of the shelter.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The foster supplies that we were able to purchase with the Petfinder Foundation grant have allowed us to have ready-to-go foster kits for our foster program. Having these kits ready and available not only expedited our foster process, allowing more animals to leave, but it also helped to remove barriers for those who had previously been hesitant about fostering due to financial constraints.

How many pets did this grant help?

On average, a full foster kit costs around $100-$125, depending on the size of the dog, as well as what supplies the foster parent may or may not already have. We estimate that we were able to get between 80 and 100 dogs into foster homes because we had foster kits available to support the foster parents.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Princess Buttercup (first photo) came into the shelter emaciated and extremely shy. She was very scared of noises and needed a quiet home in which to decompress. She was able to leave with a foster family who would work on her social skills while she gained her health. They fell in love and later adopted her!

We received the foster supplies that were bought using the grant money right before our big Home for the Pawlidays foster event. During this event, members of the public sign up to take a foster dog home for the week of Thanksgiving. Two of our heartworm-positive, senior dogs went out during this event and have since turned into longer-term fosters. Sandman, the cute brindle in the Santa picture (second photo), worked his magic on his foster parents and convinced them to foster him through his heartworm treatment.

Router, the handsome pup with the bowtie (third photo), also ended up being a longer-term foster and has since gone through his heartworm treatment as well. Last week, Router’s foster emailed me that she was going to adopt him because she couldn’t imagine him ever leaving her home.

Both of these foster parents were sent out with supplies acquired through the Petfinder Foundation grant. We believe they chose to extend their foster period beyond the Thanksgiving break because they were sent home with the necessary resources/supplies and felt supported by our foster program as a result.

Friends of the Palm Springs Animal Shelter: Dogs Playing for Life Mentorship Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The resources provided by the Petfinder Foundation to the Palm Springs Animal Shelter covered the costs for a member of our behavior team to attend a DPFL mentorship program at Austin Pets Alive! in Austin, Texas.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant enabled one of our behavior-team members to become more proficient in organizing and staffing dog playgroups at our shelter. She has not only been able to re-establish small (for now) playgroups, she has also begun to build a volunteer team to help run playgroups, as well as train staff to do the same. She is currently working on more enhanced kennel routines for dogs and helping staff and volunteers to increase their skills in this area. We are truly grateful!

How many pets did this grant help?

Our January adoptions increased by more than 100 percent, for a total of 63 dogs. I’m comfortable assuming that at least 25 percent of these dogs – nearly 16 dogs – were rendered more adoptable due to playgroup activities.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

The following dogs have been trained specifically by Vanessa Marin, who attended the Dogs Playing for Life mentorship program at Austin Pets Alive! in Austin, Texas. She has seen a significant reduction in stress in all of them, and several have gone on to forever homes. Many had been returned due to issues in the home and are currently with pet owners who are committed.
Duncan – high-energy, returned multiple times
Timon – high-energy, 441 days at the shelter
Cinnamon – good with humans, dog-reactive
Ripley – high-energy, ADOPTED after two returns
Paige – slow to bond with humans, reactive with other dogs, ADOPTED after one return
Anton – high-energy, good with other dogs, difficult for some humans to physically manage, ADOPTED after three returns

Friends of the Plymouth Pound, Inc.: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

See below.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Rosie and Rachel benefited from this donation, which helped update their rabies and distemper vaccinations and provided combo testing for them.

How many pets did this grant help?

Two

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Rosie and her sister Rachel were presented to a local veterinarian for euthanasia due to their owners no longer being able to care for them and family members not wanting them. Both were 10 years old and in good health. The veterinarian contacted Friends of the Plymouth Pound to see if we could make room for them in our adoption program. We accepted them, but only after they had updated testing and vaccinations. This money helped pay for Rosie and Rachel to get a second chance at life: As of this date, they are BOTH in new forever homes! Thank you!

Heartland Animal Shelter: Dogs Playing for Life Mentorship Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The grant funds were used to send me (Heartland Animal Shelter’s shelter and dog program manager) to the Dogs Playing for Life mentorship program at Austin Pets Alive! in Austin, Texas.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant allowed me to get formal, immersive training in running playgroups. Rather than rely on trial and error and my own experiences, I benefited from a master class of seasoned professionals. The two leads for the DPFL program were so knowledgeable and helpful and gave me the confidence to handle introducing new dogs to each other rather than relying on the same helper dogs or pairs of friends and potentially burning those dogs out. The grant has allowed me to expand the playgroups I conduct to include every single big dog in our care; they all have at least one friend. Since my mentorship program, I have also trained a number of volunteers to run these groups on their shifts, and a formal training and documenting process will be put in to place in the coming month!

How many pets did this grant help?

The grant helped and helps all of the dogs in our care on site. We have about 20 big dogs at any given time, and all of them have been able to have at least one friend and are socialized to other dogs at least once a day now.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

When I returned from the training in November, I was determined to get our longest-term dog, Blade (first photo), into a playgroup. For his entire tenure at the shelter, he had never interacted with another dog because we believed him to be too reactive. During the training, I could not stop thinking about how wrong that was, but I knew I had to introduce him to just the right kind of dog. Because of the DPFL training, I was able to identify the perfect “helper” dog for Blade. The week I returned, I had a friend from another shelter who had also gone through DPFL training come in and help me. The experience was magical: Blade’s tail was wagging and, despite his age (12), he was prancing like a young pup! After Blade had played for 10 minutes with the first helper dog, I brought in another. Seeing Blade play with not one but two dogs, after such a long period of social isolation, was wonderful to behold.