Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

Stray Cat Blues: P.L.A.Y. Pet Beds
What was the money or product used for?

The 2019 P.L.A.Y. Pet Beds grant provided us with 20 beds that are used in the cages and throughout the Whiskers Way Station shelter for a comfortable resting place for the cats and kittens.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

See above.

How many pets did this grant help?

Currently about 15 shelter cats, but the shelter will continue to use them on new cats and kittens at the shelter.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We often get cats who are pulled from Animal Care and Control (ACCT) in Philadelphia hours before being euthanized. These beds offer a comfortable place for these frightened kittens until they are adopted. In March, Stray Cat Blues was contacted by ACCT about several litters of tiny 2-week-old kittens who not only needed round-the-clock bottle feeding, but had badly infected eyes too. (ACCT doesn’t have the staff to bottle-feed overnight or provide long-term care.) It was obvious that some of the kittens had eyes that were beyond saving and that these babies would require lots of care, but one of our awesome fosters stepped right up and brought five of these tiny babies into Stray Cat Blues!

Simultaneously, we rescued two 6-week-old kittens, Bryce and Harper, from ACCT, who also had one badly infected eye each. We brought them into Stray Cat Blues’ Whiskers Way Station after a short stay in a foster home.

Lycoming County SPCA: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

General animal care

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

See above.

How many pets did this grant help?

Several

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

The pet sponsored was Dorothy. “Hello there! My name is Dorothy and I can’t wait to find a forever family who will appreciate me for the beautiful, quirky girl that I am. My eyes are a little extra close together, giving me an adorable look, as well as perhaps some blurry vision. I love quiet homes and taking the time to develop rich relationships.

“As Kelli, the SPCA’s Animal Team Leader, explains, ‘We originally thought Dorothy was a very old girl because of the shape she was in at intake and the fact that she seems to be unable to see well. Over her time here, she has started grooming herself, and her coat is losing the old, unhealthy-cat look and coming in soft and thick. She does have issues with her vision; how much vision she has is not determined. She appears to see shapes and objects coming towards her, but struggles with depth perception and focusing on an object near her. She wants attention at times, but needs her space at other times. Most of these things we believe are related to the vision issue and the fact that she had to try to survive on the street for an undetermined amount of time. She has really thrived in a foster home and we are looking forward to her landing her forever home.’

“I desire to be the only cat in my new home, due to my uncertainty about fast-moving objects coming near me. I am currently in a foster home, so if interested, please contact the SPCA.” Meet Dorothy here.

FACE Spay/Neuter Clinic: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

Providing care to a kitten until he was old enough to get fixed and go to his forever home.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant supplemented our limited funding to help a homeless kitten get the care he needed before he was old enough to be adopted.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Ralph was brought to FACE after being found in the middle of a very busy street. He was a tiny, defenseless kitten who would not have been able to survive on his own. Ralph stayed with a foster family until he was old enough to get neutered and go to his forever home. His new family tells us, “We never imagined being this in love with him, but we are absolutely smitten! Thank you again!”

Poodle and Pooch Rescue of Florida: Senior Pet Adoption Grants
What was the money or product used for?

The money from this grant was used to cover Leo’s adoption fee of $200 for the new adopter, and to supply the new owner with seven months of Leo’s heart medications.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We believe that, by offering an adopter financial help with Leo’s costly heart medications, we were able to cast a wider net to attract people who would be willing to consider adopting Leo, a senior dog with ongoing medical expenses. With this grant, we significantly reduced the amount of time it would normally take to find a suitable adopter and get Leo in his forever home.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Leo is a special-needs senior Peekapoo boy who came into Poodle and Pooch Rescue’s care on April 19, 2019. His owners had taken him to a boarding facility in south Florida and never came back to pick him up. When the boarding facility finally reached his family, they said they didn’t want him and that if they were forced to come back for him, they were immediately taking him to Miami-Dade Animal Services.

Knowing he was a senior dog and very likely to be passed over at MDAS, since they have nearly 400 dogs currently up for adoption, the boarding facility called Poodle and Pooch and asked us to help. We have strong relationships with many Florida shelters, boarding facilities, and vets’ offices, who know we have an outstanding ability and deep experience in taking in senior dogs, providing them excellent medical care, and finding them new forever homes in which to see out their golden years. We often get calls, e-mails and pleas on Facebook to help senior dogs in the state because they know we have the compassion to help seniors in need.

We had Leo transported to one of our vet partners, Chuluota Vet Hospital, where Dr. Zern (the practice owner) examined him. Leo was aged at 13 years old, weighed 13.4 lbs. (thin), was heartworm-negative, had lenticular sclerosis, was diagnosed with congestive heart failure and was coughing. His heart murmur grade is a 5 out of 6, he has good joints, his urinalysis was normal, and he had an enlarged heart with marked pulmonary changes due to CHF and a large spleen.

Our goal was to give the appropriate treatment to Leo in order to prepare him for a foster home and, eventually, adoption. After completing his vaccinations, getting a dental and being prescribed the proper dosage of heart medications (Furosemide, Enalapril and Vetmedin), Leo moved into a Poodle and Pooch foster home. Leo needed a special adopter for several reasons: 1. He was 13 years old, 2. he had a serious heart condition that required expensive monthly medication and it was unknown how much time he might have left, and 3. he required a belly band due to frequent urination (caused by one of his meds).

We posted Leo for adoption on Petfinder and are happy to report that Leo found his forever home and was adopted on June 27, 2019. He’s such a sweet, happy and loving boy and deserves to live out his final years as a beloved part of a family.

Yuba County Animal Care Services: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

This money was put toward sponsoring kittens at our Petco adoption event.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant allowed us to find new homes for some of the animals in our care.

How many pets did this grant help?

With additional funds from our volunteer group, we were able to sponsor five kittens and two dog adoptions.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

These kittens had been at our shelter since they were tiny babies, and with more than 70 kittens in our shelter, we were looking at ways to find some of them new homes. We are happy to say that all five kittens found new homes with help from Sponsor a Pet donations and our volunteers’ contribution. The two dogs we took also were adopted!!

Hope2K9 Rescue: Dogs Playing for Life Mentorship Grant (Invitation Only)
What was the money or product used for?

The grant was used to expand our trainer’s knowledge of dog behavior, appropriate play styles and body language.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

After completing the mentorship program, we offered dog social events to our community as a healthy and safe alternative to dog parks. At the events, we share our knowledge of appropriate play and dog body language. Several of our community members own dogs or have newly adopted dogs who are reactive or have behavioral issues; they do not have access to venues in which to properly socialize their dogs, and thus feel the need to surrender them to a shelter. Hope2K9’s mission is to keep dogs in their homes with FREE support.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant has helped at least 15 dogs so far.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Cypress, a 6-year-old pittie who has been in our rescue for a little over 400 days, truly benefited from our expanded knowledge of dog social behavior and, slowly but surely, learned how to relax and socialize. We are happy to report that she is now adopted, to a family with another dog. We once thought she would need to be in an only-dog home. She is now happily playing with her new brother and living the dream (first photo).

A dog named McKinley was recently rescued. She developed leash reactivity and got herself into many scuffles at dog parks. Her owner quickly took advantage of our pack social events to help McKinley learn how to be around dogs. With the knowledge gained during DPFL, we were able to share some insight into McKinley’s behavior and educate the owner on what was appropriate play and how to advocate for her dog. McKinley was able to let her guard down and enjoy her time with all the other dogs, as well.

Thank you!

Homeward Animal Shelter: Senior Pet Adoption Grants
What was the money or product used for?

The money will be used to purchase a year’s worth of insulin, insulin syringes and prescription food for Bella, a senior diabetic cat. Unfortunately, she has not yet been adopted, so we have not yet spent the money, but have been promoting her more in hopes that her new home can be found soon!

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We are using this grant as an incentive to adopt Bella, our senior diabetic cat. Bella has been waiting over two years for a home and has not found one yet. We are hopeful that this grant will give someone the final “push” to meet Bella and fall in love!

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Bella has not yet been adopted. From her Petfinder profile: “My name is Bella, and I am a sweet, shy girl, with the softest of fur! I’m a little older gal, so I like to relax and take life at a slower pace. I am diabetic, so I take insulin shots after every meal, but I do take them very easily, so don’t that deter you from meeting me! I am a total sweetheart, and I would just love a nice, quiet home to spoil me! Come and meet me today — I’m sure you’ll fall in love!” Meet Bella here.

Washington County Animal Shelter: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

To pay the adoption fee for three cats.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Sponsoring the adoption fee helps to get animals quickly adopted.

How many pets did this grant help?

3

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Three kittens were adopted as a result of this grant.

Cooper's Chance Animal Rescue: Senior Pet Adoption Grants
What was the money or product used for?

Grant funds were used to remove the barrier to adoption for our senior pet, Walter, who had been in our care for several months. The funds were used for neuter surgery and waiving the adoption fee for his new family.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant funds directly helped a senior pet, Walter, by removing adoption-cost barrier and helping him to connect with potential adopters he otherwise may have not had the chance to meet.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This grant directly helped senior pet Walter find his furever family. Walter is a 12-year-old Queensland heeler mix who was rescued from Pinal County Animal Care and Control after he was found roaming a gas station in Casa Grande, AZ. He was emaciated, dirty and covered in ticks; it was obvious he had been out in the desert for a few weeks, but otherwise, he appeared healthy. Despite his ordeal, he was friendly upon intake, and to our surprise, had a microchip; but sadly, his owners refused to claim him due to his age, leaving him to die alone at the shelter. Abandoned and confused, Walter spent two months at the shelter before a plea was sent to rescue him, and on the eve before he was scheduled for euthanasia, we answered the call and rescued him, bringing him to a loving foster home where he was safe and comfortable.

In rescue, Walter’s light really started to shine, and he brightened every day with his infectious smile and gentle spirit. He is a happy, healthy, polite gentleman who wants nothing more than to spend time with his family and nap in the yard. He loves car rides, pancakes for breakfast and “spaw” days. Unfortunately, despite all efforts to find a family, he was in rescue for six months, and there wasn’t any interest in a large, senior pet ready for retirement.

Although he was happy, he was not home. As time went by with no interest, his adoptability declined, so in an effort to increase his chances of finding the right family and generate more interest, we requested a grant of $400 to waive his adoption fee $175 and cover the cost of neuter surgery for $225, which included mandatory surgical bloodwork for seniors ($175 surgery/$50 senior blood panel). We believed that this would open up the opportunity for more families to adopt, and also ensure he had all proper vetting prior to adoption.

Walter was adopted by a retired couple who wanted a friendly older companion, and Walter was the perfect fit. They appreciated his waived fee, as they are on a budget and the waived fee reduced the stress associated with bringing a new pet home. Instead, they used some of that money to treat Walter to a spaw day (second photo)!

Kauai Humane Society: Cat Enrichment
What was the money or product used for?

Cat Towers: Four large and four small
Four big bags of cat toys
Music for Cats CDs and CD player
Feliway dispensers (two full kits and four refills)
Cat treats (large bag)

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Our goal for this grant was to help our fearful feline residents become more friendly in order to improve outcomes for our cat population. It is significantly harder to place fearful cats than friendly ones, either by adoption or transfer, so we used this grant to provide enrichment options for our fearful cats to calm their nerves and increase their confidence.

Through the use of Feliway kits and calming music, we were able to help turn what can be a stressful environment into a more soothing one for our cats. Cat towers gave our timid cats a safe place to watch staff and volunteers in order to get more accustomed to the presence of people. Additionally, our staff and volunteers were able to use the new toys and high-value treats to promote and reward interactions. This encouraged our fearful cats to be more social.

Upon adding these enrichment options into the daily care of our fearful cats, we started to notice many of them warming up to staff and volunteers. Not only were they more inclined to interact with people, they also solicited attention. This grant made a substantial difference in the lives of many of our fearful cats, enabling more of them to get adopted or transferred to partner organizations on the mainland more quickly. We are grateful to The Petfinder Foundation for helping enrich the lives of our most in-need feline residents!

How many pets did this grant help?

30

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Krishna (first and second photos) arrived at our shelter on April 29, 2019. Found as a stray, he was standoffish and afraid of people. As a result, he was not a cat who received much attention from adopters or our transfer partners. After we began implementing our new enrichment options for our cats, we started to notice a change in Krishna. He became calmer and began tolerating being petted. This improvement in his behavior resulted in interest from our mainland transfer partners. After Krishna had spent 63 days at our shelter, Seattle Humane Society agreed to transfer him to their facility, where he was adopted just four days later!

Masterpiece (third photo) and Banquo (pictured with Masterpiece in the fourth and fifth photos) were both helped by this grant and have really enjoyed the new cat towers, toys, and treats! They were brought in as kittens — Masterpiece on April 22, Banquo on May 9 — from separate litters. All of their siblings have been adopted. We placed them together and they have really bonded and now love playing together on their shared cat tower. They are so friendly and cute together and we know that they are enjoying all the new enrichment activities. Meet Masterpiece here. Meet Banquo here.