Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

Burbank Animal Shelter: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

Donations are used to provide for our animals while we place them in their forever homes through adoption. Funds are used to purchase anything from food, beds, and litter to more specific things as needed such as medication.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Petfinder Foundation grants help our shelter continue to care for our pets until they are adopted. Many of the animals we care for come in with special needs, indicating a longer stay for those animals at the shelter while they are ready to be adopted. Outside assistance allows our shelter to provide long-term services.

How many pets did this grant help?

8

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Alfie (pictured) was brought into our shelter as a stray and was with us for about one month before being adopted. He was a sweet cat who had been living outside. He was very sweet and eventually captured the heart of his adopter and went off to his ideal home. Stevie is another of our cats who has been at the shelter for about eight months. Stevie is a part of our socialization program because he needs a bit more attention than others to get him ready for adoption. Grants allow us to provide these services to our special-needs or long-term animals.

Prairie Paws Rescue: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

See below.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

BeeZee would have been euthanized had Prairie Paws not stepped up to care for him. He was only 6 months old and deserved a chance for a good life. The money helped with the vet costs.

How many pets did this grant help?

One: BeeZee

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We took in a puppy named BeeZee who was 6 months old and surrendered by his owners. He had been run over by a car at 6 weeks old and broke his leg. A few months later, he was run over by an ATV and the owners could not afford the medical work to fix the same leg. BeeZee was surrendered to us and the leg was evaluated and could not be saved. Amputation was the only option. BeeZee is recovering and will be ready for adoption in a few weeks.

FOWA Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Surgery for Kadyn

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Kadyn was hit by a car and was lying in the road when someone stopped to help and brought her to the veterinary office we use. They called us and asked if we would take her.

How many pets did this grant help?

one

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Kadyn was hit by a car and luckily someone stopped to try to help. She was in bad shape when she first came to us. Her eye had popped out of her eye socket; it hurt so much, it had to be removed and she spent days in the hospital with fluids, pain management, and surgeries. She also went to an orthopedic specialist for her broken bones. The grant helped us pay for her ICU care, update her vaccines and have her eye removed. She is now in foster care doing great, and we are starting to accept applications to find her the right home. One of the interested adopters is the women who stopped and saved her! Meet Kadyn here.

Friends of Parkville Animal Shelter: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

Vaccinations, microchip, and neutering.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We would not be able to rescue and adopt the dogs and cats we do without the monetary support from donors and organizations like yours.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Winslow is still looking for a permanent family. He is a stray who recently came to us and is now in a foster home. From his Petfinder profile: “Winslow is an American foxhound with an estimated date of birth of June 2012 and weighing about 50 lbs. Currently in a foster home with several other dogs, Winslow is doing well, showing he has good house manners and getting along with the other dogs. However, he hasn’t shown any inclination to play with the dogs, and since foxhounds are normally highly social dogs, this leads us to believe that, up until now, he wasn’t in a situation where play was allowed or, perhaps, possible. In the house, Winslow is quiet, very tolerant, and gentle. But outside, Winslow is primarily a tracker, ready to follow a trail, so his new owner will have to be vigilant that, on walks or in the yard, he is not able to escape to chase whatever wildlife he smells. A dog the age of Winslow is past the puppy stage but still has plenty of energy and exuberance for life, and lots of affection to give his people. So far, Winslow appears to be housebroken.” Meet Winslow here.

Cavalier Rescue of Florida: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

To help pay for eye surgery for Carter, who needed to have one eye removed due to glaucoma and cataract surgery in the other eye.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped us pay for a very expensive surgery so we could help Carter. Medical bills are our highest expense, so this grant really helped us meet the needs of Carter and our other rescues,

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This grant supported eye surgery for Carter, an approximately 10-year-old ruby Cavalier King Charles mix. He arrived in the care of Cavalier Rescue of Florida on Oct. 1, 2018. Carter was found as a stray by a good Samaritan, who could not keep him. It was evident that Carter had been living on his own for some time. He was fearful, had extremely long nails and needed advanced medical care. We were contacted to take Carter and we jumped into action! Upon coming into rescue, he went to a veterinarian for a complete checkup, was examined by a cardiologist and visited an ophthalmologist. He has a heart murmur, concerns with both eyes and was neutered and had a dental cleaning.

When looking at Carter, it was very clear that he had problems in both eyes. His left was completely blind and no longer functional. His right eye had a prominent cataract. He was likely completely blind. Following his visit to an ophthalmologist, we learned that he had glaucoma in his left eye and, due to a lack of treatment, his eye had essentially died and the inflammation had changed the structure of his eye socket. For his health and safety, the eye had to be removed. We were optimistic that his right eye could be treated for the cataract, allowing him to see again.

Carter underwent surgery to remove one eye and a cataract in the second eye. Sadly, the cataract surgery was not successful. Carter began experiencing uncontrolled pressure in the eye and eventually lost the second eye. Carter is still recovering from his surgeries and learning to navigate the world completely blind. We are looking for a very special family for him once he is well enough for adoption.

Cherished Cats Rescue Alliance: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The grant was used to cover the expense of surgery for a cat named Chiarra, who needed one eye removed due to infection and entropion eyelid repair on the remaining eye.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We use “Pat’s Fund” to help cover the costs of non-standard veterinary care, such as enucleations and amputations, for cats and kittens in our care. Chiarra was one of several sick or injured cats in need of significant vet care we had encountered recently and it had depleted our ability to afford to take in additional cats. The Petfinder Foundation’s generous support of Chiarra’s surgery means we were able to accept and help cats like her.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Chiarra was a sweet 5-month-old kitten who entered rescue at approximately two months old with significant eye issues. She was found alone in a parking lot in Danville, Pennsylvania, with one eye already ruptured due to infection. Her remaining eye was compromised due to entropion eyelid. After spending some time in rescue with good nutrition and care, she had surgery to remove the ruptured eye and repair the eyelid issue on Nov. 2, 2018. Removing Chiarra’s ruptured eye was necessary to reduce her pain level and vastly reduce the possibility of further complications, and the eyelid had to be repaired to reduce the risk of continued irritation and possible infection prior to making Chiarra available for adoption. Following her surgery and recovery time, Chiarra was brought to the adoption center at PetSmart in Selinsgrove, PA. She spent about a week there before being adopted by a local family.

The Humane Society of Hobart, Inc.: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

The sponsorship funds were put towards the expenses of her heartworm treatment.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Tuesday was heartworm-positive, so the funds from this sponsorship helped us pay for her heartworm treatment while she was in foster care.

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Tuesday was adopted by her foster family on Dec. 28, 2018. From her Petfinder profile: “Adult female terrier mix. Brindle with white. Estimated to be 4-6 years old. Weighs about 75-80 lbs. Well-mannered. Not overly active. Walks well on a leash. Good with some other dogs her size. We believe that Tuesday was used only for breeding purposes and, when she was no longer needed because her puppies could be sold, she was abandoned and eventually brought to the Humane Society of Hobart by a good Samaritan. Tuesday has tested heartworm-positive. We are currently in search of a foster home for her while she undergoes treatments, which would last about 4-6 weeks.”

R.E.D. (Rescue Every Dog): Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

Helped pay vet bill for Tabitha, a sweet brown tabby tuxedo cat who was transferred from a local shelter that R.E.D. supports when they need help.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

R.E.D.’s biggest expense is for medical care, so this Petfinder sponsor helped pay for Tabitha’s vet bill.

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Tabitha is a sweet brown tabby tuxedo cat who was transferred from a local shelter that R.E.D. supports when they need help. The shelter was full and Tabitha had no place to go, so R.E.D. stepped up and took her in to find her a forever home. R.E.D. made sure she was seen by a veterinarian and that she was wormed, treated for fleas, and tested for FELV and FIV. The wonderful donor who sponsored Tabitha through Petfinder helped pay for all of those services. Tabitha was adopted, but unfortunately, she was returned when the adopters decided she was not a good fit. R.E.D. once again stepped up and ensured that Tabitha will stay safe and well cared-for until a home can be found. Once a R.E.D. cat, always a R.E.D. cat.

Animal Protection Center of Southeastern Massachusetts: P.L.A.Y. Pet Beds
What was the money or product used for?

We used the P.L.A.Y. pet beds to keep our pets warm and comfortable this winter. We ended up using them not just for the dogs but for cats as well!

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Our building is older and sometimes we struggle in the winter to keep the heat up, so having these cozy pet beds really helped the pets stay warm and comfortable, even on cold days. We also put the beds out in the open in our cat lounge, which encourages the kitties, who love the soft material, to stay out in the open and interact with people more.

How many pets did this grant help?

We got 10 beds but we wash and reuse them daily, so really, this grant is helping animals every day.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Gus (first and second photos) was a 10-year-old cat who came into the shelter when his owner had to move. Despite a mangled ear and some obvious time outside, Gus was friendly, so we put him in our cat lounge, where our cats are allowed to free-roam. Gus immediately claimed the P.L.A.Y. pet bed right out in the open and, by staying there instead of hiding in a cat tree nook or under a chair or bed, he was viewed more often and finally adopted!

The third and fourth photos show a gray-and-white kitty named Corey. She also loves the P.L.A.Y pet bed and is using it while she waits here for her forever family. Corey is a lovely senior girl in need of a forever home. She came in quite matted and needed a shave. She’s feeling much more comfortable now and is ready to start her next chapter! Corey is friendly and out-going with people, but seems to prefer to be the only pet in a home. Meet Corey here.

3rd Coast Labrador Retriever Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Surgery to repair Louis’ fractured ulna and radius (plate and screws placed in his front right leg)

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We often take in the “underdog,” which means extensive veterinary care outside of the normal spay/neuter, vaccines, heartworm testing and microchipping. Without grants like the Petfinder Foundation’s, we wouldn’t be able to continuously take in these underdogs.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Louis was found in Detroit in an abandoned building with three other dogs. It is suspected that he jumped out of a window, injuring two of his legs — one severely. Detroit Animal Control picked Louis up and released him to 3rd Coast Labrador Rescue. We took him for immediate veterinary care. He had surgery to place a plate and screws in his leg and is currently in foster care recovering. Louis has not yet been adopted. He was just placed in a cast, which will be replaced in a couple of weeks. We expect that he will have x-rays in about six to eight weeks to confirm that the bone has healed as expected, at which point he will be placed up for adoption.