Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

Lab Lovers Rescue: Senior Pet Adoption Grants
What was the money or product used for?

We pledged to use the money for Sammy’s pain meds and joint supplements, as well as waived his adoption fee. He has not been adopted so we are still providing the meds.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We are a very small rescue, so to receive $1,000 in grant money towards the care of a senior dog is a huge help. It would take us several fundraisers to even come close to raising that much money. Because of this grant, we are able to provide wonderful care for Sammy without draining our resources, which we can now use towards the care of other dogs in need.

How many pets did this grant help?

The grant was to be used specifically for one dog, so, one.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Sadly, Sammy has still not been adopted. The ability to offer the grant has raised his visibility and, while we’ve had more inquiries, we received only one application and that adopter chose not to pursue things. We have not had a single person actually meet the dog since he’s been in our care (11 months). From Sammy’s Petfinder profile: “Hi, my name is a Sammy. I’m 13 years old, weigh 70 lbs., and am told I’m a handsome, purebred yellow Labrador retriever. My sister, Sasha, is 11 years old, weighs 73 lbs., and I know she’s a pretty, purebred chocolate Labrador retriever. We are a bonded pair that can’t live without each other so to adopt me, you must also adopt Sasha.

“GOOD NEWS! The Petfinder Foundation awarded us a grant to help get me adopted! The money will be used to provide a year’s worth of the pain medications I need for my creaky old hips, and a year’s worth of joint supplements that help my mobility, too. The grant also covers my adoption fee.

“Sasha and I love each other very much and have lived together since she was 8 weeks old. I’m very sociable and follow our foster mom around. Sasha keeps track of both of us.” Meet Sammy here.

Humane Educational Society: Play Yard Renovation Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The money was used to update our existing play yards to better meet DPFL recommendations. We extended the smallest yard by 20 feet. We updated an existing fence line with sturdier and safer fencing. We added gates between the three yards and put catch pens at the entrances to each yard. We also got new gates or refenced existing gates.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped the pets in our organization by making the play yards safer and easier to use. The dogs can now be safely collared and let into the yards. The catch pens are also a benefit for getting the dogs out or even separating dogs that may be having difficulties. The gates between the yards help me manage all three yards more safely and efficiently when I am the only leader. We are now able to bring out more dogs each day we do playgroups. The dogs love coming out to groups. The staff love the better fencing and the catch pens. Several staff and volunteers have asked me, “How did we ever do anything without the catch pens?!”

How many pets did this grant help?

Approximately 150 as of now.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Two dogs who came to the shelter very fearful are George McFly (first photo) and Marty McFly (second photo), a bonded pair. We have had them in playgroups since before we did the play yard renovations. When we first tried them, we quickly learned they are gate-darters. Almost every time we opened the gates to let other dogs in or out, these two would try their hardest to run through the open gate. It was frustrating to the volunteers and made doing playgroups very difficult. We had to chase the McFlys around many, many times. Now that we have the catch pens, though, we haven’t had to chase them at all. If they do try to get out, they go right into the catch pen. It sounds like a small thing to be thankful for, but it has saved us from chasing them around many times. It has saved the dogs from getting hurt running around or even escaping the shelter. Since they are fearful of new people most of the time, having them get out of the facility would have made it impossible for us to catch them again. The volunteers and staff are all thankful for the new fencing, gates, and catch pens! I have included photos of the McFlys hanging out in the yards with a whole bunch of their doggy pals. Meet George McFly here. Meet Marty McFly here.

The Animal Foundation: KONG Toy Grant
What was the money or product used for?

One of our goals at The Animal Foundation is to give every adoptable dog a KONG, every day. On any given day, we have an average of 150 dogs available for adoption. That’s a lot of dogs and a lot of KONGs! Fortunately, we have wonderful volunteers who help us stuff our KONGs with peanut butter and freeze them (and afterward, clean them!). We deliver the stuffed KONGs to all our adoptable dogs, which helps contribute to their well-being while they’re in our shelter. (See photo of freezer with peanut butter KONGs lovingly stuffed by our volunteers.)

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The KONGs granted by the Petfinder Foundation enable us to reach our daily KONG goal. We made this our goal because we understand the benefits of KONGs for dogs while they’re in our shelter: They help relieve boredom and stress, stimulate thinking and motivate behaviors, and encourage natural chewing to self-soothe. We also use KONGs as a tool for training and a means to promote quiet time in the kennels.

How many pets did this grant help?

750

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Bella, a 4-year-old bully mix (first two photos), arrived at The Animal Foundation on Dec. 26, 2018. She was a gentle, affectionate girl who was overlooked for adoption too many times. Although she did well with children, she could be a bit “bossy” with other dogs, which made finding a forever home (and even a foster home) challenging.

As we do with all the animals in our care, we aimed to make Bella’s stay here as happy and comfortable as possible. We noticed that Bella was reassured by having her toys around her, including a white stuffed lamb and a KONG, so we made sure to always have these items in her kennel.

Bella was overcome with delight when her new frozen peanut butter-filled KONG was delivered each day. After receiving it, she would hold it in her mouth and wiggle excitedly and proudly around her kennel. Once she had settled down and eaten all the peanut butter, she’d snuggle up on her bed and cuddle her KONG, then doze off into a satisfied slumber.

We know how much dogs value these daily delicacies. Not only do they provide a tasty treat, they provide mental stimulation and encourage physical activity. Bella was able to adapt to shelter life (which isn’t always easy) because we were able to provide her with enriching toys such as KONGs.

We’re thrilled to report that Bella found her forever home on Feb. 28, 2019.

Paws for Life Rescue: Senior Pet Adoption Grants
What was the money or product used for?

This grant will cover the $60 adoption fee of a senior cat, Finnegan, and it funds approximately four years of Feline Enteric Support supplement from Standard Process, which, at $0.23 a pill (one tablet two times daily) will altogether total $732 (reimbursed to adopter).

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helps Paws for Life offer funding (adoption fee, supplements) to an adopter in hopes of facilitating the adoption of a very handsome senior cat. We appreciate all the support that the Petfinder Foundation gives Paws for Life to enable us to save more lives.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This grant is for Finnegan, a senior cat with pancreatitis which is managed with supplements. While he has had inquires, he has sadly not received any applications for adoption. He is still waiting for his forever home! The grant will cover his adoption fee and approximately four years of supplements. His profile can be found here.

Stray Hearts Animal Shelter: Play Yard Renovation Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Fencing, gates

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped us to divide a large play yard into smaller play yards for safer integration during playgroups.

How many pets did this grant help?

<1000

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Willow was a feral Great Pyrenees who had to be trapped and brought to our shelter. He had to be medicated to handle. Eventually, he was able to be leash-walked to the play yard and was integrated through the fencing until he got used to the others. He was taken from the smaller yards to the larger one repeatedly until he became comfortable with the entire playgroup.

When the public came to watch our playgroups, a local rancher witnessed Willow’s ability to interact with the other dogs without incident. Willow was successfully adopted and is now an integral part of the working dogs on a ranch.

This dog had a zero chance at adoption, but with assistance from smaller play yards, his experience being socialized was made so much easier!

Helotes Humane Society: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The grant award was used to pay for the medical care of foster cat Maple, who required a surgical amputation.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

By performing this important surgery, the veterinarians were able to relieve Maple’s pain and thus make her adoptable.

How many pets did this grant help?

One cat, Maple (renamed Gypsy)

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Gypsy is a beautiful 6-month-old long-haired calico. She was brought to us because her owners could not afford the care she needed. You see, she was found as a small kitten with a terrible injury. One of her rear feet was missing and the other one was partially gone. The finders kept her as long as they could but realized she needed more care than they could give her. While she was in our care, the veterinarian said Gypsy needed part of her leg amputated to relieve her pain.

Thanks to a generous Emergency Medical Grant from the Petfinder Foundation, we were able to get her the surgery she desperately needed. She recovered in a foster home, where she received wonderful care. She uses the litter box fine and doesn’t let her disability hamper her life. She loves lying around and getting lots of love and affection.

Gypsy was adopted immediately after we posted her story on social media. Her new family saw the post about her surgery and commented on it. They filled out the application the next day and picked her up two days later!

Kibblez of Love: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

ACL surgery

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped us give Karma her last surgery.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Karma is an adult female American Staffordshire terrier who is around 3-4 years old. She was rescued off the streets of South Florida and was found by Kibblez of Love in a terrible state. It was clear that Karma had suffered from abuse and neglect. She was found emaciated, heartworm-positive, in need of hip surgery, and with two torn anterior cruciate ligaments that need to be repaired. Despite all of the trauma she has endured, she is still the sweetest girl. Karma has been in Kibblez of Love’s care since July of 2018. She is vaccinated and her shots are up-to-date. She is also spayed and housetrained.

We treated her heartworm and provided her with one ACL surgery, but she needed a second, which this grant paid for. Thanks to the generosity of the Petfinder Foundation, Karma received her final surgery and has been adopted as a result.

Humane Animal Treatment Society: Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Our Orvis grant that we received was used to purchase 12 brand new, durable Kuranda beds for our dog kennel, 13 replacement Kuranda bed legs, 20 martingale collars and 10 leashes for our dogs when they are taken out on volunteer walks.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant really helped our organization by replacing our most well-loved Kuranda beds that have gone through the most wear and tear. Many of the ones we currently had were chewed on the sides, had a missing leg or were just becoming difficult to clean as well as our staff would have liked. By receiving this grant, we were able to purchase brand new ones with a more-washable fabric, and the dogs have been loving them so far.

We had a lot of escape artists in our kennel at one time a few months ago. Since we send our dogs out on walks with volunteers, we need our equipment (leashes, collars, and harnesses) to be reliable and without fault. Unfortunately, flat collars can be easy for a dog to back out of and get loose from. Because of this we chose to put our escape-artist dogs on martingale collars to eliminate this issue for the safety of all.

How many pets did this grant help?

At least 30 already, and countless in the future as more dogs come into our care.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Broggy, a husky mix (first photo), was one of the many dogs who were most helped by this grant. Broggy came to us with porcupine quills in her face. After vet care, she went onto the adoption floor and was able to go on volunteer walks. From the beginning, Broggy was the master of slipping her collar. It was decided that she would go on walks in a harness, but then it took staff five minutes to put her in a harness. It was stressful for both staff and volunteers knowing that Broggy would try and slip her collar every time she went on a walk. When we purchased our first set of martingale collars, Broggy was one of the first dogs who received one. From that moment on, the staff didn’t have to worry about her slipping her collar or fussing with a complicated harness. Broggy was adopted on Oct. 30, 2018!

Reggie, a hound mix (second photo), is a staff favorite and an absolute sweetheart. He is currently at our shelter. He adores his Kuranda bed. Reggie has genetically poor back knees at 6 years old and is currently in laser therapy. He never leaves his bed, and getting a new Kuranda bed helped him stay off the solid concrete floor and support his knees. Reggie is still at our shelter and looking for his forever home. From his Petfinder profile: “I’m a laid-back guy who will let you know when I want attention and love. I can be independent and waddle around doing my own thing, but I still really would like for someone to love me unconditionally. I could possibly live in a home with other dogs if we met first and our personalities are compatible. I could live in a home with feline siblings or children.” You can meet Reggie here.

Best Chance Animal Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Money was used to help cover vet bills associated with Boomer and his leg amputation.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped pay for essential surgery to save a dog’s life and allow him to find a forever home.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Boomer came into our care very emaciated, with an extremely low platelet count and a huge tumor on his leg. After months of building up his platelet levels and battling infections from the tumor, he was finally strong enough to have the leg removed, thus removing the cancer from his little body. This grant helped us save Boomer’s life and give him the second chance at a good home and good life he so deserved. Boomer has now been adopted to a loving family that is known for caring for dogs with special needs. Thanks to the Petfinder Foundation, Boomer got his second chance and loves every minute of it.

Cochise Canine Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Mini, a dog with stage-four mammary cancer, was taken in from the Tucson pound on June 22, 2018. She has been getting medical care from our local veterinarian at All Creatures in Benson, AZ, and from Integrative Veterinary Onocology in Phoenix. Funds were used for medical care, chemotherapy, blood work and other medications needed to keep Mini comfortable and reasonably healthy.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This week is eight months since we acquired Mini. During the first weeks we had her, she almost passed away twice. No one expected her to live as long as she has and do as well as she is doing. Mini is seen by one of her vets at least once a month for blood workups. Mini is currently on these medications: Gabepentin and tramadol for discomfort, prednisone as an antiinflamatory and to slow tumor growth, and her chemo drug every other day. Mini also takes ondansetron and metronidazol to help her gut cope with the chemo. She gets a round of antibiotics (Clavamox) for 10 days every 6-8 weeks to keep from getting infections. Mini also gets a selection of important vitamin and mineral supplements daily to boost her immune system. She is doing remarkably well and we are all hoping Mini has many more months of comfortable life ahead of her!

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

CCR picked Mini up from Pima on Friday, the 22nd of June. When putting her in the crate in the van to take her home, Mini rolled onto her side and I was horrified by the wound on her chest and under her left arm. There was a large, gaping and necrotic hole that appeared to have eaten into her underlying muscle. It was constantly oozing and draining and so large you could easily stick an entire finger into it. Several of her mammary glands were large and hard. While Pima’s medical staff did blood work and X-rays on this very sick little girl, the antibiotics they gave her had not stopped the infection raging through her body. I drove back to Tucson the next day after speaking to one of Pima’s vets and discovering Mini had not been sent home with the correct medications. After viewing the photos of her wound, surgery was moved up to Thursday morning.

Shortly before noon on Thursday, I received a call: Mini’s surgery was stopped after the removal of the major mass and lymph nodes on the left side and they had closed her up. Mini had almost died! Her temperature had dropped from a normal range of 101-102 to 92.6 degrees. She was in shock. We all feared that she was dying.

Mini was placed on a heating pad and covered with a blanket. A vet tech sat with her for the next few hours. At around 98 degrees, she woke up. Slowly her temperature crept back up to 100.8. They took her off the heating pad. Within a few hours she was up on her feet and by 4 p.m. she was drinking a little water on her own.

The next day, Friday, she began to eat. Pima kept her on strong pain medications and IV fluids. I picked up Mini noon Saturday. She was so happy to see me! Mini has been on a rocky road since surgery. On July 2, we received the pathology report: The cancer has spread to her lymph nodes. She will require more surgery, followed by treatments by an oncologist. Right now her lungs sound clear and her liver and kidney functions (as per her blood work) are doing well too. Mini is a spunky little fighter so I can only hope for the best!