Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

Pig Pals of NC: Tractor Supply Company Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Feed purchased from the Tractor Supply store in Siler City, NC. Wood and fencing to expand existing structures to accommodate 4 new pigs, and medical expenses.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant award from Tractor Supply was used in various ways. The organization used the grant to purchase feed for over 30 miniature pigs. In fact, the feed was purchased from the Siler City, NC Tractor Supply store! In addition, we had 2 newly rescued pigs that needed emergency medical care. One pig was rescued with hooves that were 5-6″ in length, crippled, and not walking (Abigail). Her companion pig (Bearista) had a 8″ by 4″ mass on her abdomen. Both had to be seen immediately by our attending veterinarian upon intake. To our sadness, Bearista passed away 2 weeks after surgery. Her necropsy revealed lesions within the intestines and cancer. Finally, we expanded our pig barn to accommodate 3 other new pigs that came to reside with Pig Pals of NC. So, the funds were also used to purchase wood for separating the stalls and fence panels for expanding outdoor pens.

How many pets did this grant help?

35

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Abigail was rescued with hooves that were 5-6″ in length, crippled, and not walking. Her companion pig (Bearista) had an 8″ by 4″ mass on her abdomen. Both had to be seen immediately by our attending veterinarian upon intake. To our sadness, Bearista passed away 2 weeks after surgery. Her necropsy revealed lesions within the intestines and cancer. Also, we expanded our pig barn to accommodate 3 other new pigs that came to reside with Pig Pals of NC (Max, Baxter, and Rooty).

Suncoast Humane Society: Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The funds awarded by this grant will greatly benefit Suncoast Humane Society and ultimately the people and animals of the communities we serve. Your support helps us to continue our affordable spay/neuter program and preventive health care services. We continue to offer our pet pantry that provides food for pets belonging to families also suffering from the economy. As the area’s only open admission animal care center, we continue to accept and care for the communities’ lost, abandoned and abused animals. The support of the Foundation is truly appreciated.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

On average, it costs Suncoast Humane Society $250 per animal surrendered to our shelter. Included in these costs is spay/neuter surgery, testing, vaccines, possible specialized medical care, possible fostering (supplies for foster parents), the cost of food and the salaries for the animal care staff who are entrusted with caring for our shelter animals. At the time an animal is surrendered we request a $25 donation per animal. Often times, people are unable to fulfill the whole donation amount as they are giving up the animal due to financial distress. We typically receive an average of $10 per animal, of which the remaining medical and housing costs must be covered through grants and general donations. In order to make more animals adoptable, we have gone above and beyond to ensure the health and well-being of our shelter animals. This is all being done for little monetary return. Throughout 2012, Suncoast Humane Society held several adoption promotion specials that offered reduced adoption fees. Rather than see homeless animals sit in our shelter, these types of promotions helped to get pets into stable, loving homes where they belong. These promotions were very successful as evidenced by the 1,100 animals that were placed into new homes this past year. By allocating the funds from this generous grant to the costs associated with our adoptable animals, we were able to ensure more animals were being placed more quickly into permanent homes

How many pets did this grant help?

Since receipt of the grant money we have adopted out or returned to owner 261 animals. These funds help us place more animals in forever homes and help to reduce the number of homeless animals in our community.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

An adoption story that we are proud of is Harley (now Koufax). Harley’s new family had adopted from us in the past, adopting Zeus, AKA Ripkin, last year. When they decided to add another pet to their family, they thought of us first because of the wonderful experience they had during their previous adoption. Zeus and Koufax became fast friends and the family said they are like brother and sister now.

Another great adoption story is about Pretty. Pretty came to us as an owner give-up because their finances had taken a bad turn and they could not longer afford to keep her. Pretty is a 9 year old female Chihuahua. After examining Pretty our animal care manager determined that she had severe dental disease which needed treatment prior to being put up for adoption. Thanks to our Shelter Angel Program, which is promoted solely as an incentive for our caring donors wishing to help individual animals with medical needs, we were able to treat Pretty and restore her smile. She then became available for adoption and found her forever home with the Butlers. They LOVE their little Pretty and she is adjusting beautifully to her new home. She loves to have her belly rubbed and snuggles in bed with them.

Dream Equine Therapy Center: Tractor Supply Company Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The $1,000 grant was used for Strategy horse feed. We were able to buy 60 bags of feed which fed our yearling and older horses for 6 weeks.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant directly affected 20 horses by providing them feed for 6 weeks. This grant also indirectly affected 50 + more horses/foals. We are scheduled to break ground on building our new foal barn at the end of Sept. By providing this grant, it helped us to conserve our funds to be able to build the barn as scheduled. This barn is crucial for us to be able to continue to rescue orphan foals in 2014.

How many pets did this grant help?

It directly affected 20 horses; indirectly affected 50+ horses/foals

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Story/Pic #1-Bambie- Bambie was rescued at just 2 weeks old and was raised on milk replacer. She was adopted at a few months old and was returned earlier this year due to her owner losing her business. She was sent to a trainer to start her under saddle in late May as a 3 year old. She was adopted in July by Brooke, a 13-year-old girl. They love each other and trail ride every day. Story/Pic #2 Storm – Storm was also rescued at a few weeks old. She was adopted at a few months old and was returned as a 2 year old, not even halter broke. She was like a wild mustang. Through the help of a few trainers she was started under saddle earlier this year as a 3 year old. She was recently adopted by Regan, a 13-year-old girl, and they also will be hitting the trails and shows soon. Over recent years with the economic downslide we have had 10+ horses returned every year due to no fault of their own. Most reasons are due to owner finances. Whenever a horse in our program is in need, we always offer them assistance or a home. We then provide proper training and again find them a good, qualified home. This grant was also able to assist with these horses that again found themselves homeless.

Good Shepherd Humane Society, Inc: Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Half of the grant funds are being used for staff training (scheduled for the month of October — a 4-week class with a trainer/behavior management issues). The other half is being used to purchase accoustic wall mats for the long dog runs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Good Shepherd averages about 40 dogs in the shelter daily. Some of our dogs have been here a year. Although they get regular walks and exercise outside, the kennels can be noisy and uninviting to potential adopters. The training class will give all the staff and any of our dog volunteers who want to participate a basic level training to handle large and small dogs, plus help us all be “on the same page” in dealing with dogs who are experiencing stress or other difficulties. rn The accoustic mats will help decrease the noise from the dogs barking. We have two long runs perpendicular to each other. The structure is concrete block, so the noise just reverberates. If we can reduce the noise volume with the mats, the dogs will be calmer, and then potential adopters will be better able to talk with the animals and with staff in a friendlier environment.

How many pets did this grant help?

approximately 40

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Molly and Sarah have been with Good Shepherd for over a year. They are sisters and have never been apart. The staff training will help us build on our work to help the girls deal with kennel stress. Also, both dogs get quite agitated when the other dogs start barking, and the accoustic mats to lower noise levels will help keep them calmer.

Horse Feathers Equine Rescue: Tractor Supply Company Grant
What was the money or product used for?

To purchase shavings, supplements, farrier care for elderly horses.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It helped to maintain a clean and safe environment for older horses that came into the barn to stay at night as well as provide much-needed supplements to help with elderly horses’ joints, maintain a healthy coat and keep them active for our program. It helped provide farrier care for those elderly horses with feet issues.

How many pets did this grant help?

6

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This helped LadyX who is an elderly miniature (28) who stays in the barn at night. She foundered in the past and with a coyote problem in our area it gave her a clean place to stay at night as well as much needed supplements to help her with her walking. LadyX is a big part of our program as she is loved and adored by the small children here who are intimidated by the larger horses.

Saffyre Sanctuary, Inc.: Tractor Supply Company Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Feed, supplies and rehab costs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It provided us the means to support the horses in our care during their recovery.

How many pets did this grant help?

3

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Lakota came to us last year severely abused and neglected. We have brought him back to health, however he still has a lameness issue that we are continuing to work on. Through his special diet and holistic veterinary care, he has made remarkable progress and should have a complete recovery. He will be able to find a permanent loving home within a year or two. Until then we are committed to providing him with the best possible care, while he continues to thrive in our safe, loving environment. Thank you Tractor Supply and Petfinder Foundation, for helping us with his transformation!

Santa Maria Valley Humane Society: One Picture Saves a Life
What was the money or product used for?

This is used to further our adoption program for cats and dogs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Sending my Program Assistant to the workshop has given her added skills in photograing shelter animals in a positive and favorable manner.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant helps the 25 dogs and 12 cats we currently have in residency, and the knowledge gained will help many more animals to come.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Patsy was an adorable, 2 1/2 year old black Chihuahua that entered our shelter in March of 2013. It’s difficult being a black Chihuahua, there are so many Chihuahuas in shelters these days. Patsy was quiet and shy and was repeatedly overlooked. We knew what a sweet little dog she was, but we weren’t sure just how to promote her so our clients could see what we saw. After being in our residence for two months we showcased her as Pet of the Week, but the photograph we used made her look sad and pitiful. With our new Canon EOS camera and the newly acquired photographic skills obtained at a recent workshop, our Program Assistant, Sandi, made it her mission to photograph Patsy in a new light. She set about snapping good quality pictures showcasing Patsy at her playful best. We discovered that Patsy loved to chase soap bubbles, but didn’t like them to touch her. It was quite fun to watch. We updated her profile photo on our website, in Petfinder, and on her kennel card. Finally, Patsy’s day came. A woman came in to look at the adoptable dogs and fell in love with little Patsy. After 5 months in our shelter, Patsy was adopted into a loving forever home.

Blind Cat Rescue: Shelter+ Challenge
What was the money or product used for?

Vet care

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Helps us to continue providing quality care for the cats.

How many pets did this grant help?

3

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

These 3 little fellows (Peanut, Skittles, Jellybean) were found as strays and taken to the local [open admission shelter]. With horrible upper respiratory infections and bad eye infections they had become blind. A local group contacted us about them. They will need eye removals, shots, neuters etc. So your check will be a great help.

Santa Maria Valley Humane Society: One Picture Saves a Life
What was the money or product used for?

Taking better photos of our adoptable animals.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We have received increased interest in our adoptable animals since posting better-looking pictures on Facebook, Petfinder.com, Instagram and our website.

How many pets did this grant help?

It’s difficult to determine an exact number of animals helped but interest has definately increased. We have received many compliments from our Facebook followers about the more appealing photos.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Two-year-old Poodle mix Frannie (first two photos) was at our shelter since June 22. Her photo was not particularly flattering. Since retaking her picture with the One Picture methods and reposting, Frannie received interest from a family in Wisconsin and a family in Northern California, and was adopted on Sept. 4 by family who live an hour’s drive from our shelter. There is no question that the increased interest was a direct result of Frannie’s new pictures on Petfinder.com.

Brandy (fourth photo) was actually a transfer in from a rescue organization we occasionally work with in the Central Valley. She had kennel cough and some pretty bad skin issues when she first arrived, but after medical treatment she healed and perked up quite a bit. She was a resident in our kennels for less than a month before finding her perfect match, a family of four (last photo). You can see what a difference a good photo makes!

CHAAMP - Chesapeake Area Alaskan Malamute Protection: Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

$607 was used for vet care of 5 Malamutes
$143 was used for flea/tick preventative, heartworm preventative and de-worming meds
$250 was used for transport

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Vet care is our largest expense. We pulled two seniors this month from [open admission] shelters knowing that we had the funds to help them from your generous Orvis Operational grant. Keeping the Mals on preventative meds obviously saves us from the additional cost of treatment if we had not done so. Many times we can find the space to keep a dog safe, however we don’t have the funds to pay for transport. Your grant helped with 2 Malamutes that we may not have been able to transport without your funding.

How many pets did this grant help?

8

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Beck, and his brother Mickey, were owner released [from a breeder] at 7 months. Both boys were overflowing with parasites, giardia, coccidia, and had never been vetted. They were underweight, totally matted with mud and full of fleas. With your generous grant, we were able to get the boys cleaned up, vetted and adopted. The phone of the lake is Beck with his new family.

Tonka, who is 6 years old, found himself in an [open admission] shelter through no fault of his own. His human was sentenced to jail and Tonka was let loose on the streets. We were able to have him transported with Pilots n Paws, get him vetted with your generous donation, and placed him with a loving family. There are two photos – one of Tonka coming off the plane and one with his family.

Mrs. Radish and Mr. Rhubarb were found wandering and picked up by Animal Control, where they were brought to a kill shelter. No one came to claim them and they were scheduled for euthanization due to an overcrowded shelter. A bonded pair, we were able to find an adopter willing to give them a home together. With your generous donation we were able to arrange transport for them to spend the rest of their days running on a securely fenced 3 acres of land. A Malamute’s dream – cool country, lots of places to run and play, and a family to love them. The picture of the two dogs standing at the kennel door are R & R.