Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

Cat Haven: A Shot at Life Vaccination Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Vaccinations were used for vaccinating cats and kittens.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We follow a rigorous vaccination protocol for our kittens. They receive vaccines every 2 weeks until they are 4 months old. Because of this protocol, we used all of the vaccines in 4-5 weeks.

How many pets did this grant help?

We had approximately 50 kittens in our program and each received 3-4 vaccines prior to adoption.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We rescued a mom and her kittens shortly after they were taken to our local animal control. This was a very high-kill shelter, so their lives were saved! Sandy, along with her kittens, was dumped in a neighborhood, shortly after her kittens were born. A family took them in and tried to care for them. They had other pets in the home who were not doing well with the new additions so they were taking them to animal control.

Fayetteville-Lincoln County Animal Shelter: A Shot at Life Vaccination Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The product was used to vaccinate the cats that arrived at our shelter to help them get a better shot at life and adoption by being given a healthier start. Forty individual cats received the product once and 10 of the 40 received the product twice, totaling 50 doses.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped us by giving us vaccines to use on our cats and kittens. These vaccines allowed us to give our cats and kittens a head start on long, healthy lives in their new adoptive homes. Forty individual cats were vaccinated and 10 of those received a second dose two weeks after the initial dosage. Because these kittens and cats were vaccinated, they felt better and healthier. Healthy cats are more adoptable than sick ones because they are friendlier and are more likely to live longer, happier, and healthier lives.

How many pets did this grant help?

40 cats (10 received two doses)

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Kentucky: This little kitten was rescued by one of our Society members. Her mother is a semi-feral cat. Kentucky (first photo) and her five siblings all received two doses of the donated vaccine to date. They are happy and healthy and both Kentucky and her sibling Spot (second photo) were adopted. Kentucky was the first kitten of this litter to warm up to human interaction, and she taught the rest of the litter to play and that humans were alright too. She was adopted on Oct. 11, 2013, to a good home where she will have her own little boy to play with. Her new name is Sally and we are so thankful that, with a good head start on becoming a fully vaccinated and healthy kitten, she will live a long and love-filled life.

Apollo: Apollo (third photo) and his sister Artemis came to us as a pair of forlorn strays in need of a good home. He received one round of the donated vaccine before he was neutered and then went home along with one of our other available kittens to a wonderful home. He is sure to live a happy and healthy life with all of his animal siblings thanks to a great head start from the Shot at Life vaccine grant.

Hawke: A lonely little kitty who had lost his way found himself staying with us. Thanks to the Shot at Life vaccine grant, he got a dose of good healthcare before going to his new forever home. We are certain that, with a good head start on future health practices, little Hawke will grow up happy and healthy.

Chicago Cat Rescue: One Picture Saves a Life
What was the money or product used for?

To improve the pictures of our adoptables

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We learned more about grooming, photographing and marketing our adoptables with a goal of increasing adoption rates and decreasing the time from take-in to adoption.

How many pets did this grant help?

Our two workshop attendees have shared this knowledge with all volunteers so many cats now and in future.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Since attending the workshop Bobcat and Munchkin have been adopted. These boys came into Chicago Cat Rescue’s care when their elderly human companion passed. They lived with a dog and another cat. The dog was rescued by a dog only rescue group who notified us of the three cats. The boys were clearly a bonded pair and we were so happy Maggie was looking for an adult bonded pair to adopt!

Retrieve a Golden of Minnesota (RAGOM): Shelter Challenge
What was the money or product used for?

The money was used for the spay and neuter of unaltered rescue dogs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

RAGOM dogs are required to be spayed or neutered before adoption. Though our territory covers five states, we are fortunate to take advantage of a partnership with a low-cost, mobile spay/neuter unit in the Minneapolis area, which is where a majority of our dogs are fostered. Our Shelter Challenge Grant paid for spay and neuter costs for 14 of our rescue dogs, ensuring they would not contribute to pet overpopulation.

How many pets did this grant help?

14

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Early this summer RAGOM agreed to take a pregnant momma from Kentucky. Before she could get on transport she gave birth to 9 adorable puppies. Once they were old enough to travel, they all made their way to a foster home in Minnesota where, before they were adopted, they were each spayed or neutered with grant money from the Shelter Challenge. These special pups are Wren, Gia, Cinnamon, Drake, Romeo, Bella, Ace, Nutmeg and Dozer.

Friends of Pets: Shelter+ Challenge
What was the money or product used for?

We used the shelter challenge grant for two projects. One was focused on medical care of senior dogs we rescued, and the other was to provide spay/neuter assistance to Anchorage Animal Control during their “Price is Right” shelter cat adoption promotion

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The dogs we rescued had been left at Animal Control by their former owners at age 11, 12, and one unclaimed stray at age 13. All three dogs still were vibrant with love left to give. Rescuing a senior dog takes extra resources because senior best care — that includes blood work, x-rays etc. — is expensive. Two of the dogs also needed dental cleaning and extractions. We were able to find homes for each of the dogs (two in one home!) and the new owners were grateful for the investment in their health care. During the cat adoption promotion, 64 cats were adopted from Anchorage Animal Control and we assisted to spay and neuter 16. The remaining cats were already altered.

How many pets did this grant help?

19

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Aspen is a sweet Jack Russell Terrier who found herself as a stray at Anchorage Animal Control at about age 13. No one came to look for her and her adorable personality grabbed our hearts and we asked if we could rescue her. The veterinarian diagnosed some health concerns, including a significant heart murmur, but we invested in getting her to a baseline of “senior” health, had her teeth cleaned and set out to find her a home. A veterinarian who was traveling to Alaska from Canada for a conference was looking at dogs available for adoption in the Anchorage area and came upon Aspen’s picture and it grabbed her heart. What better match for a senior dog than a veterinarian! After she, her husband and their current dog had a chance to spend some time together and agreed that they were willing to make the commitment, off they went back to Canada. The reports and pictures we have received indicate that Aspen could not have landed in a better home. Her antics make them laugh and she has gone from abandoned stray to a well loved member of the family.

Emmy and Robby are a pair of very sweet senior Bichons. They were released by their owner to animal control due to a new baby in the home and not having time or resources to care for the dogs. Emmy and Robby have wiggled their way into the hearts of a family in Wasilla!

Southern Nevada Bully Breed Rescue: Shelter Challenge
What was the money or product used for?

The grant money was used to help us secure a larger facility to care for the dogs in our rescue.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We received the grant right on time to help us secure a larger facility for our rescue dogs. This new facility is in a central location which is easy for adopters and volunteers to get to, and can house many more dogs than our previous location. In fact, we were immediately able to save 6 additional death row dogs which included 2 seniors.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant has helped over 40 dogs to date.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Daddy is a 6 year old Cane Corso mix. He was surrendered to the shelter by his owner, for reasons unknown. Being quite charming and loveable, he became a volunteer favorite. However, due to his age and being listed as a “pit bull mix,” no adopters expressed any interest in this big boy and he was running out of time very quickly. Because we now had the extra space, we were able to save Daddy and bring him in to rescue. He still hasn’t found a home, but has lots of interest from adopters and we know it’s just a matter of time until we find his perfect forever home! We love him dearly and are so happy we were able to save him.

NMDOG, INC (formerly New Mexico Dogs Deserve Better): Shelter+ Challenge
What was the money or product used for?

We are an in the trenches, chained dog rescue serving the Forgotten Dogs across the state of New Mexico. NMDOG is an all volunteer, foster based organization. All grants and donations go directly to meet the medical and daily needs of dogs currently in our care, as well as dogs in or Community Outreach program. NMDOG regularly does Outreach missions across the state. We deliver dog houses, food, toys, winter coats to chained and backyard dogs in need. We also replace heavy chains with trolley systems in the areas with no anti tethering legislation. NMDOG works in conjunction with many law enforcement agencies throughout the state and we are called in on cases of severe cruelty as well as some hoarding cases. The dogs we serve are the most neglected, abused and forgotten ones…the ones that need us the most.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Many dogs come into the NMDOG program broken, both physically and emotionally. Many of our dogs require extensive physical and behavior rehabilitation before they are ready for adoption. We provide comprehensive medical care to every dog that comes to us, routine vetting (including s/n, vaccs/HW test and microchip). We also provide our dogs with training and emotional enrichment…all of which costs money, lots of it! This is where every cent of every dollar of our Shelter Challenge grant money goes.

How many pets did this grant help?

$1000 provides basic vetting, initial intake, housing, food & training for 2 previously chained dogs.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Panda was a sweetie pie Cattle Dog mix that was been chained all of her young life on the Okhay Owingeh Pueblo. When Panda came to us, she was just a year old. She longed for a chance at at real LIFE where she will be able to fulfill her true potential and have the family she has always dreamed about! Panda entered the NMDOG program scared and unfamiliar with love. We helped Panda become the dog she always wanted to be and found her a wonderful family!!! Boone was been chained for the past 2 years out on the Mesa of Valencia County. Recently, his family began leaving for long periods of time and he was left to depend on his one and only friend….a neighbor that has been watching over him, worrying for his safety and health. After a long discussion with Boone’s guardians, his friend was able to convince them that Boone deserves better!! Day in and day out…for weeks that turned into months, he waited for his people to return. When they did, it was only for a short time and they never paid him any mind. Boone is now safe with us here at NMDOG. He has learned to walk well on a leash, basic obedience & is now a healthy weight of nearly 90 pounds! Boone is a great dog still looking for his forever family! There are many more out there that await our assistance and this is why we are so grateful for awards like the Shelter Challenge grant to keep us going! We do our very best to touch as many parts of NM as we can, as often as we can! The ones that suffer the most are often the ones that no one ever knows about…the forgotten DOGS 🙁 We never forget them!

Tranquility Trail Animal Sanctuary: Shelter+ Challenge
What was the money or product used for?

The grant was used for medical care to spay, neuter and microchip eight bunnies.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The $1,000 grant enabled us to spay, neuter and microchip eight bunnies who are now up for adoption.

How many pets did this grant help?

This $1,000 grant helped eight animals.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Tranquility Trail Animal Sanctuary was called regarding a few domestic bunnies running loose in a neighborhood. Being domestic bunnies, they cannot survive long outside, especially in the heat of the Arizona summer. Upon arriving, we discovered that, in addition to the bunnies we were called about, there were also several living in small cages outside in the 100+-degree temperatures. We rounded up the six bunnies running loose. We spoke with the people who had the bunnies in the cages outside about their living conditions and they agreed it was less than suitable and surrendered two more bunnies to us.

All eight bunnies were brought to the sanctuary, where they will live in large, indoor, air-conditioned areas with daily play time and couch time until we find the perfect family for each of them. The $1,000 grant Tranquility Trail received from the Petfinder Foundation and the Animal Rescue Site was instrumental in helping us to spay, neuter and microchip all eight bunnies, which is the first requirement we have before they are eligible for adoption.

Parker, Maya, Rocco, Joey, Tucker, Ava, Piper and Juliet are all now healthy, happy bunnies waiting for their forever families. Thank you so much for this grant to help these eight wonderful bunnies!

National Mill Dog Rescue: Shelter+ Challenge
What was the money or product used for?

The Shelter Challenge Grant was used to provide veterinary care for newly rescued puppy mill dogs. National Mill Dog Rescue (NMDR) has saved over 8,000 dogs since we were founded in 2007, and each month we rescue approximately 80-100 dogs. Our biggest expense is for veterinary care, and the generous grant you awarded NMDR helped provide this intervention for dogs who needed such care that were rescued in mid-2013. The dogs were spayed or neutered, received all vaccinations, and were treated for parasites, infection, and dental problems. We are a no-kill shelter and are committed to providing all dogs with the veterinary care, nurturing, and socialization they so desperately need. Your support helped with these veterinary expenses for the newly rescued dogs and gave them a good start to their new lives.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

All rescued dogs, upon arrival at the NMDR kennel, undergo a comprehensive intake process during which they are vet checked and treated for disease, injury, dental problems, parasites, and other health-related conditions. One of the dogs rescued on this trip, Leroy, received this veterinary care and his story and photos are shared within this report. Your generous support helped to cover some of the veterinary costs needed to care for the group of dogs rescued along with Leroy. The dogs arrived at the NMDR kennel with severely matted hair, ticks and fleas, and were malnourished and very fearful. It has been inspiring to watch their transformation from the first day of arrival (when they received basic veterinary care and grooming), to their days at the kennel where they always had plenty of food to eat and received daily socialization from caring volunteers, to the time when they realized that they were in a safe and loving place and began to trust again! The resilience and love these dogs demonstrate is incredible, and your generous financial support helps to make that transformation possible.

How many pets did this grant help?

Your grant helped to covering the basic veterinary costs associated with the intake of this rescue in July, 2013. The rescue involved 77 dogs who arrived with a variety of conditions. While costs vary per dog, the basic veterinary care provided at intake can run from $100-200 per dog.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

One of the dogs rescued on this trip is Leroy, age two. After being rescued from a mill in Missouri where he lived in filthy conditions, Leroy arrived at NMDR. Volunteers found that he was infested with fleas and ticks; in fact, they pulled 28 ticks off of Leroy that first day. Much of the scarring you can see in the photos is from flea and tick bites that had been left untreated at the puppy mill. Leroy also had a bad ear infection and needed surgery on one eye due to past ulcerations. NMDR treated the flea and tick infestation, cleaned and groomed him, and he spent his first days in a safe, warm kennel with a raised bed, plenty of food, and caring attention from volunteers. Leroy was then placed with a foster family where he is learning to trust and loving the attention and care he is receiving. The last photo in the series attached shows Leroy enjoying some time on the deck with his foster-siblings! Leroy is now awaiting his forever home. We thank you so much for the generous support that makes stories like Leroy’s possible.

START OVER ROVER, INC.: Shelter+ Challenge
What was the money or product used for?

100% of our donations and grants received goes directly towards the care of our animals. We are all volunteers, so that money can be spent solely with the animals in mind.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We used this grant money to purchase medical supplies and medical treatment for our animals. All of our animals are spayed/neutered and given vaccinations before they are re-homed. Our medical bills are approximately $2,000 to $3,000 each month.

How many pets did this grant help?

We currently have 120 animals, but that number fluctuates on a weekly basis.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Zeus is a beautiful American Bulldog. He came into Start Over Rover as a 10 week old puppy, dressed in a T-shirt and diaper, and he was being carried like a baby by his oldest human sibling. Zeus had previously been listed on Craigslist as Free to a Good Home by a breeder. Zeus’ back legs were deformed and he had constant diarrhea. Zeus’ human grandma thought that her daughter, a mom with 5 kids under the age of 6 yrs old, needed a puppy with deformed legs to add to her brood. Zeus’ then-Mom recognized that she couldn’t take proper care of Zeus while also taking care of her 5 children. She came to Start Over Rover for help. Zeus was immediately snatched up by one of the volunteers who fell in love with him at Rover. He was adopted immediately! Zeus had one back leg amputated the following week, and his recovery is going well! The other leg is getting stronger everyday and Zeus gets around very quickly. Zeus will have more surgeries ahead of him as his gastrointestinal tract is not quite right, but right now he is happy boy who loves to play with his pack! Today, Zeus is the mascot for Start Over Rover. He symbolizes all of the beautiful animals with special needs who, unfortunately, do not normally survive in most shelters.