Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

Old Dog Haven: Shelter Challenge
What was the money or product used for?

Veterinary expenses, which are 73 percent of all our costs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Because we spend nearly $40K/month on veterinary expenses and medications, it allowed us to provide one more needed medical procedure to a senior dog in our care.

How many pets did this grant help?

We will consider it to have helped Satchel, an adoptable dog who had surgery and a dental the day after we realized we had won this grant.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Our example is Satchel, a 10-year-old black Labrador mix. He was taken to a shelter as a stray after the 4th of July; his owners declined to reclaim him and he stayed for nearly two months before ODH was asked to take him into one of our foster homes. He fit in immediately, received a thorough veterinary exam with lab work, and a perianal tumor was found along with a few teeth needing extraction. The procedure to remove the mass (which was benign), clean his teeth and do extractions with dental radiographs plus pain medication and antibiotics cost $1229.60 including the 20% discount from our vet. Our grant covered most of this procedure. He has recovered well and will be posted for adoption very soon. UPDATE as of 1/26/14: Satchel has been adopted!

Second Chance Animal Shelter: A Shot at Life Vaccination Grant
What was the money or product used for?

We received FVRCP vaccinations. These were used to vaccinate our shelter cats.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This helped our organization by providing us with vaccines that helped to save us money on vaccines. This grant helped us to be able to provide vaccinations to our shelter cats. This year was an especially tough year as many of the cats that came into our shelter had not had vaccines prior to intake. This meant that we had to vaccinate these cats, as well as provide a second FVRCP vaccine if necessary.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant help to vaccinate 200 cats.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Cheri and her two kittens, Peter and Brandy, came into our shelter. The owner had too many pets to care for. Cheri had no prior vaccines so she required not just the initial FVRCP vaccine, but a second vaccine 30 days later. Her kittens also required vaccines. One of the kittens, Brandy, was born with only one eye. This grant helped us by providing these vaccines. The cost of care for shelter pets continues to rise each year so the savings of these vaccines is a wonderful help in our mission.

Iredell County Animal Services: A Shot at Life Vaccination Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The product was used to vaccinate adoptable cats at our shelter. We do not routinely vaccinated incoming felines, but this grant allowed us to vaccinate cats that on intake at the shelter could be potential adoption candidates

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant aided in vaccination of cats that were placed for adoption, and allowing earlier vaccination of cats that had the potential of adoption to aid in the decrease of disease.

How many pets did this grant help?

Currently, we are still using the vaccinations to vaccinate cats that have the potential for adoption. From start of the grant in September we have vaccinated over 50 cats and are continuing to use the vaccines

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This is Cornbread, who was adopted on Oct. 4. She went to live with a family where their 2-year-old will cherish this little girl forever!

Cornbread originally came to us as an owner surrender (along with some litter mates).

Chucky (second photo) was adopted Oct. 29.

China (third photo) came to us after her adopted owners surrendered her less than a year after adopting her. Her owners were moving and had to give up their animals. China is barely over a year and seemed to liked the dogs that would come sniff around in the cat room! She was adopted to a wonderful home on Oct. 11!

Paws Of Bremerton: A Shot at Life Vaccination Grant
What was the money or product used for?

This product was used to vaccinate cats and kittens to protect them from disease. All cats and kittens in our shelter and in foster care are given these vaccines as appropriate.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant has helped ensure the health of our center residents and helped reduce the cost to the shelter and adoption center of providing necessary vaccines to our resident population.

How many pets did this grant help?

33 cats and kittens have been vaccinated using this grant

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We used this grant to vaccinate Gypsy, a domestic short hair, gray and white kitten who was rescued from a young couple who had her tied to a grocery cart by a string. The individual who rescued Gypsy saw the couple abusing her, took her and brought her to PAWS of Bremerton. Gypsy’s front leg is dislocated at the shoulder and is under veterinarian supervision to see how she can best be helped.

Lucky's Place: A Shot at Life Vaccination Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Fel-O-Guard Plus 3 was used to vaccinate our cats.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It reduced the vet expense for distemper vaccinations which allows us to afford to help more cats! This grant has saved us over $400 in vet expenses so far!!

How many pets did this grant help?

17 so far

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We received the product just a couple days before 13 farm feral cats arrived. Timing was perfect allowing us to vaccinate the cats at the time they were moved into their condos rather than having to handled them multiple times to get them into carriers to take to the vet. We had a vet present at the same time so we could vaccinate for rabies, distemper and felv test all at once. This grant has saved Lucky’s Place over $400.

Best Chance Animal Rescue: A Shot at Life Vaccination Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Vaccinating cats

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

helped us afford to vaccinate cats. and helped by opening up our rescue cats to go to other rescues where they can be placed quickly

How many pets did this grant help?

about 20 cats

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Many of our cats did not have names because they only stayed with us for a few days before leaving for other rescues. I am providing pics of those cats who got their second chance thanks to this grant.

Kopy Kat Sanctuary: A Shot at Life Vaccination Grant
What was the money or product used for?

We received free vaccines via the “Shot At Life” Grant. Vaccines were used to vaccinate cats that are residents at the sanctuary, as well as, new rescues that are placed in foster care until they are adopted.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We saved alot of money by using these vaccines and not having to pay our veterinarian for them.

How many pets did this grant help?

50 felines

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

One of our volunteers found a litter of five kittens abandoned by a local restaurant dumpster. ittens are very expensive since they need their initial core FVRCP vaccine and then a booster vaccine. By receiving the “Shot At Life” Grant of free vaccines, we were able to vaccinate this litter and provide the booster vaccine without the added expense. The money that we had allocated for the vaccines was able to be spent on a cat that need surgery to remove an eye. It was ulcerated and very painful. We were able to pay for that needed surgery since we received assistance with our vaccines via the “Shot At Life” Grant. Thank You.

Humane Society of Southern Arizona: A Shot at Life Vaccination Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The production was 100 bordetella vaccines and was used to vaccinate 100 dogs who arrived at our facility.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant help the HSSA offset the cost of vaccinating dogs coming into our shelter against bordetella. Vaccinates are very important to sustaining a healthy environment within our shelter.

How many pets did this grant help?

100

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We don’t have one specific story about an animal this saved. However, by vaccinating for bordetella, we hopefully will see fewer dogs coming down with kennel cough and needing to be quarantined for 10 days on antibiotics. It is difficult on the dog to be in quarantine for 10 days — which is now 10 days longer that he or she has to stay at the shelter. Additionally, there is an increase in medical costs to treat the animals with antibiotics. The HSSA strongly believes in the importance of all vaccines, even if they are booster vaccines, in a shelter environment.

Hot Springs Village Animal Welfare League, Inc.: A Shot at Life Vaccination Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Vaccines provided for benefit of our shelter kittens and cats. Stray’s and ferals.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Here is one story: Brenda H. had 7 cats that we gave shots to. She is a deaf mute that has a very limited income and couldn’t afford to take her 9 cats to the vet. One of her cats is allergic to shots so we did not give that one a shot. One of her cats has urinary crystals. She had just had to have the urinary crystal cat at the vet for 3 days; because of that, she had no money left for shots. Angel Fund paid for rabies and we gave her 7 of these FVRCP shots. (Our Angel Fund is for low income hardship members of our community, who love their pets. This helps them keep them in their homes. We frequently provide food as well.)

How many pets did this grant help?

So far, 53.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Little Foot (pic 1) was a stray that showed up at the Coleman Crystal Mine. Some people who were living there in a travel trailer fed her as best they could. She had a litter of kittens around the end of January and another litter, Comet, Cupid, Noel, Rudi and Nicky about July 24. Little Foot and two of her older kittens are now barn cats. The others have been adopted or are available for adoption and all received their vaccines through this program.rnrnHemi was brought to the shelter as a baby (with his eyes still closed) with his sister. They were from a feral mom that left those two in the rain when she moved the other kittens. People rescued them out of the rain and brought them to the shelter when they figured out they didn’t know how to feed them. The sister died. Hemi survived. He was bottle fed and has been adopted.rnrnInky also came from the shelter. Some people found him as a tiny kitten on their patio. Even though he was very friendly and about 6 weeks old, no mother or other kittens were ever seen. No one ever inquired about him. He is available for adoption, but not until after Halloween because of his coloring.rnrnAlso, included is a picture of Cupid, one of the mama cat, Little Foot’s, second litter of kittens. Cupid and his brother Comet, were adopted by the same family for two little boys!rn

Maddie & Friends: A Shot at Life Vaccination Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Thank you Boehringer Ingelheim, Petfinder and The Animal Rescue Site for awarding the FVRCP vaccinations to Maddie & Friends. The vaccines were used, and continue to be used as we intake kittens – they all receive their first shot on arrival, if old enough, and they receive their booster if they haven’t been adopted by the time the shot is due. We are a small organization so only half of the vaccines are used to date (10/27/13) but the rest will be used as needed.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant greatly benefitted our organization. We are a small non profit and depend of the public for donations. Not having to purchase vaccines allowed the money that would have been spent to be used for our main mission. Our main goal at Maddie & Friends is to reduce the number of animals euthanized by offering spay/neuter clinics. We hold monthly low cost clinics for the public – funds that would have been used to purchase vaccines were at a recent spay/neuter clinic.

How many pets did this grant help?

Directly, to date, the vaccines helped 100 cats, the remaining vaccines will help additional cats as needed. Indirectly it helped 9 other cat receive spay/neuter surgery, which includes shots.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

The four kittens pictured in the first photo were tossed out in a wooded area in Mid October in Salem County, NJ – I received a call that someone had spotted them so went to look. I actually met the couple there so they could point me in the right direction. There were six kittens dumped, the couple decided to take two as pets with them. The remaining four were brought home and are currently being held for adoption. They were immediately treated for parasites and given vaccines, using vaccines provided through the grant. From left, are Georgie (female), Levi, Ace and Dutch. They had a rough start in life, being dumped in the woods, but now are looking forward to a life with a loving family.

The second picture is of a Salem City Police Officer holding a kitten. This officer happened to be on the corner while a group of school children passed. He heard a kitten cry, and asked the child to stop and open his back pack. Inside was a newborn kitten – eyes still closed. The kitten was brought to Maddie & Friends and bottle fed until ready to be adopted. The kitten was named after Officer Smith, who is often called “Smitty.” The kitten was named Smitty, and on this day, the officer came to see how the kitten he saved had grown. Little Smitty also received a vaccine which was part of the grant. He is now living with his forever family.