Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

American Eskimo Rescue of St. Louis: Senior Pet Adoption Grants
What was the money or product used for?

The money was used for Lillian, whom we rescued as a senior and who was quite sick with liver disease.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped Lillian stay on her medication, as it covered medications, vet visits, and an ultrasound. With this grant, we were able to do bloodwork and other tests to make sure she was not getting any worse. Lillian continues to do very well in her adoptive home. She is a happy and healthy 13- to 14-year-old American Eskimo dog.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Lillian was rescued from the Humane Society of Missouri. They released her because she was “nippy.” When we rescued her, we took her to the vet and checked her blood and urine. Based on those results, we did an ultrasound that showed that Lillian had gallbladder disease and may have been having “mini” gallbladder attacks, which caused her pain. Since she is now on the appropriate medications, she has improved so much, is not in any pain, and is not nipping! She was doing great and was ready for her new home. In order to get her adopted, we were able to tell the new parents that we could cover her medications and vet visits for the next three years. Twelve months at $150 per month is $1,800. The $1,000 grant helped us with this adoption and gave Lillian the chance to go into a new home and not have to remain in our rescue group. Lillian deserved a forever, loving home!

Lillian was adopted by a family that was used to the American Eskimo dog, as Lillian could be a little snappy, but that was probably because when we got her, she was in a lot of pain. We could not even pick her up, she was so painful. Not any longer! With the help of this grant, we were able to get a complete diagnosis and continued medications for Lillian.

Vanderburgh Humane Society: Play Yard Renovation Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The money will be used to pay for installation of donated turf in our dog play yards. This project took longer than anticipated due to us having to wait for donated rock (to spread under the turf) and then getting onto the landscaper’s schedule for turf installation, which is often weather-dependent. It should be completed within two to three weeks, since we have already been on their schedule for a couple of weeks as of today.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This turf will increase the quality of life for the dogs, who won’t have to potty on just rock anymore, and will help with the overall aesthetic and maintenance of our dog yards. It will provide a more positive experience to adopters and save staff time spent weed-whacking and grading rock.

How many pets did this grant help?

950

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

The turf has not been completed yet. After it is, I will gladly send some photos and videos of dogs playing on it! I have attached a photo of Isabella, shown standing on our bare dirt/gravel yards right now (first photo). There is also a photo of our dog yards taken a few months ago, and some dogs in playgroups in the yards in their current state.

Autumn Acres Animal Rescue: Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

With the generous $1,000 granted to Autumn Acres Animal Rescue through the Orvis partnership, we were able to purchase 12 large dog beds, three cases of 51 dental chews, three small Nylabone chew bones, 15 normal-sized squeaking tennis ball packages, a large variety of Gnawsome Squeaker Ball toys (various sizes/colors), five extra-large Nylabone dog chew bones, five large alligator squeak toys, five extra-large Kong squeak tennis balls, 20 plush squeaker toys, five mat-style dog beds, 20 cases of dog biscuits, two puzzle toys with filler treats, and seven rubber squeaky toys for the tougher chewers.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Our rescue focuses on the dogs most in need. We take the ones who will be harder to place, which means they will have a longer-than-normal stay time. We currently have 33 dogs in our program and they all enjoyed toys, treats, or beds from this donation. Six dogs have been adopted in the past 60 days and they also enjoyed the treats and toys. We still have toys saved for more dogs as they come in. We like to give each new dog a special toy and blanket to be theirs. We have two dogs going through heartworm treatment and they love the puzzle toys. It gives them something to do while they are on exercise restriction. We expect this grant to help 75 dogs in total.

How many pets did this grant help?

39 so far.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Jerry (first photo) came to us through the local city shelter. He was also a part of their special-handling unit. He didn’t handle being on the shelter floor very well and was shut down and growling. Once he was moved to a quieter place, they saw him open up more, and they reached out to rescues to help. We went to meet him and he was so sweet with other dogs and just a bit nervous with humans. We knew he’d love our daycare environment and pulled him. Jerry is a big goofy clown for the most part. He loves toys, loves his people, and is a blast. But he doesn’t like strangers and he doesn’t like when people “force” him to do things. He’s been working with a trainer and he’s going to be just great in the right home. Meet Jerry here.

Ollie (second photo) came to us through the local city shelter. He was a “special handling” case and was up for euthanasia. He has barrier issues and will not allow strangers to touch him. Once he gets to know you, he’s a total clown. He is a special-needs boy who has some potty accidents when stressed, and visitors can stress him. He needs an understanding home willing to go gently with him. He LOVES toys. He was thrilled to have new toys. Meet Ollie here.

Dinah (third photo) is a sweet pit bull/hound-mix girl who is as dog friendly as they come. She loves all people, loves dogs, loves water, loves toys, loves life! She was overlooked for so long, but she was adopted just recently 🙂 She did get to play with toys and loved a green ball!

Bubbles and her sister Blossom (fourth photo) are two very aloof Chihuahua mixes. They will pick one person, and once they’ve bonded with that one person, no one else matters. They are super sweet to their one person. They are crate-trained, they follow you around for treats and give your fingers kisses, but they won’t allow strangers to touch them and will avoid interactions as much as possible. It’s hard to get people to give them a chance. They want the dogs who greet happily, and because Bubbles and Blossom ignore them, they decide not to go further. Bubbles and Blossom loved their new toys and their little nylabones. Meet Bubbles and Blossom here.

Cheddar (fifth photo) is a sweet, easygoing dog with people. He loves to play fetch, loves kids, and he’s house-trained and well-behaved. Cheddar came to us through the Springfield, MO, shelter. That shelter doesn’t adopt to the public, and the only way dogs make it out alive is through a large network of rescue groups. Cheddar loves fetch and was thrilled with the new toys. Meet Cheddar here.

Miles, a.k.a. Miracle Miles (sixth and seventh photos), has an incredible story: “Tonight was a reminder that God always has plans for us. I was driving home and it was around midnight, which means it’s dark as can be on our country road. As I’m coming up to the Cooley Lake area along 210, there’s a red dog walking down the road. He’s coming straight towards my headlights and looks totally lost.

“210 is a two-lane highway with a 60-mph speed limit. I immediately slow down, turn on my flashers and move to the side of the road. I roll down my car window and try talking to the dog. He’s looking at my car and has a scared-but-wanting-saved look. Either someone had dumped him or he’d gotten himself completely lost.

“I get out of my car because another car is coming behind me. I wave and try to slow him down. The dog is still standing in the middle of the road. The driver stops in the middle of the road and sees the dog/me and decides to help. This awesome guy pulls over in front of me and starts tossing fast food at the dog to try to get him to come. He’s crouched down and trying to lure the scared red dog.

“As I’m digging in my trunk for food/toys/leashes, another car is coming. So I start standing in the road waving a bag in my hand to TRY to slow the car down. This car refuses to slow at all and comes so damn close to hitting the dog. It’s an absolute miracle it misses him.

“Another car is coming shortly after and the dog is still pacing back and forth from one side of the road to the other. At least this car slows down before driving past.

“And then a train goes by and between the train, the cars almost hitting him, and us, he decides we aren’t as scary anymore. The dog is really wanting to get into a car and the guy opens his car door and the dog climbs in. That guy was AWESOME.

“Without the two of us working together, I think that dog would have been killed. God put us both together at the right time and right spot to be able to catch this dog.

“We took him in; he had no microchip, and the next day I checked the area where we’d found him during the daylight. There was a red blanket next to the road. We placed found ads and posted him found all over. No one ever called. We checked all of the lost-pet reports; no one ever posted about him. We brought him in to our vet for his vetting and found that he is highly heartworm-positive. He’s a sweetheart. Totally. He’s a ham for photos and he’s got so much personality and charisma. I think he could be a movie dog or a TV commercial dog. The entire vet staff just adored him. He’s currently going through heartworm treatment. He’s on the preliminary meds and he gets his first injection on Nov. 20. He’s not listed on Petfinder yet, but he will be once he’s over his treatment.

Cats Are Us: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Alice was found underneath a dumpster and rescued through the work of volunteers. Alice was taken to a local veterinarian in Clarksville, Tennessee, where it was determined that both eyes were infected and she was blind in one eye. Alice was given eye medications in hope of clearing the infection and saving her vision in the other eye. She was referred to an ophthalmology specialist in Nashville, where she was seen on May 23. The specialist concluded that Alice cannot see out of either eye and the diagnosis is ocular lesions with infection in both eyes. The specialist recommended surgery to remove both eyes immediately. The overriding concerns were pain and the possibility of infection spreading to the brain. The cost of the surgery was $1,861. This Petfinder Foundation Emergency Medical Grant was used toward the cost of Alice’s medical care, including her enucleation surgery to remove both eyes.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped Cats Are Us save the life of this remarkable kitten. Our organization was helped tremendously by the amount of this grant given the amount of medical expense incurred to save Alice’s life. Your grant allowed Alice to receive the care she needed and allowed Cats Are Us to continue to rescue and adopt other cats using our normal operating funds. We are so grateful to the Petfinder Foundation for awarding this grant to our rescue and to this special kitten.

How many pets did this grant help?

The grant helped one cat with a signficant emergency medical issue.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Alice is now about 5 months old and in good health. She continues to live with amazing foster parents who are also dedicated Cats Are Us volunteers. Not only does Alice have two human beings to watch over her, she also has several foster-cat siblings. Despite losing both eyes to infection, Alice lives a life much like a sighted cat. She eats, sleeps, plays, jumps and interacts with her human and feline friends. Since she doesn’t have vision, Alice uses her other senses to understand her world and communicate with people and other cats. She listens carefully, she tests unfamiliar territory with her paws, and she uses her sense of smell to find food and her cat companions. It is a fascinating and beautiful thing to watch this young cat navigate life without vision. We plan for Alice to remain with her foster family for the foreseeable future. This family loves her and is thrilled to have her in their home.

Roses Rescue: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

All donations received are used for veterinary care, food and other items needed for the care of the animals, veterinary care being at the top of the list.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Many times, the cost of our veterinary care is much higher than our adoption fee. Grant donations greatly assist the rescue in covering these costs.

How many pets did this grant help?

For Quarter 3, one dog

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Cheeko was surrendered to the rescue as a special-needs boy. He had been diagnosed with IVDD (intervertebral disc disease) and because of that he has some nerve damage that makes him sometimes dribble urine. He is currently on a homeopathic preparation that seems to help and wears a washable belly band in the house. The grant money assisted Rose’s Rescue in sponsoring his adoption fee. Cheeko was adopted on Sept. 11, 2019.

Jackson County Humane Society: Senior Pet Adoption Grants
What was the money or product used for?

The money was used for the adoption fee and Dasuquin joint-health supplements for one of our senior dogs, Red Run.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We were able to get Red Run adopted. Also, the article about Red Run in the newspaper helped to make the community aware of the shelter’s needs, and we have gotten donations because of this to help with other senior dogs.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Red Run is an 8-year-old, 21-lb male terrier who came to us via a transport from Dade City, Florida. As part of the Saving Death Row Dogs and Cats program, we take in animals from high[-intake] shelters. Red Run was on the list to be euthanized in Dade City because of his age, but because of the transport and great volunteers, we were able to save him. He was the only one of the animals who came on that transport who still needed to be adopted. Red Run is good on a leash and is mellow. He gets along well with other dogs and cats.

Besides the issue of his age, he also has some joint problems and needs to be on a joint-health supplement to help him move better. Red Run was a great dog with a lot to offer, but adopters were concerned about the price of the supplements. He’d had a difficult life and deserved a loving home to live out the rest of his days. We knew he would make a good companion if just given the chance.

The grant money was used for his adoption fee, which was 70 dollars, and Dasuquin supplements, which are $47 for an eight-week supply. We used the funds to purchase the Dasuquin for a two-year period.

We put an article in our local paper about Red Run and the grant that we received. We got a lot of calls from potential adopters and were able to find a man who fit with Red Run’s personality.

St. Clair TNR & Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The emergency medical grant was used for a lifesaving surgery to remove a mass from Tessa’s abdomen.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant allowed Tessa to have the second surgery she needed while in our care at less than four months of age. She had what was described as a mass in her abdomen, and we were told she had little time.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Tessa came into our care after being hit by a car. She had a surgery to repair damages, and we thought she was on the road to recovery. A short while into her stay at her foster home, her foster mom noticed what we believed to be swelling in her abdomen. The foster mom was told by the vet who had performed Tessa’s first surgery that it was just swelling, and that she should hold a cool compress on Tessa’s abdomen.

A couple of days later, the foster mom took Tessa to get a second opinion. This vet put her on an antibiotic for the “swelling.” When she was not getting better, we decided it was time for a third opinion. This vet did an ultrasound and knew there was something in Tessa’s abdomen that needed immediate attention. She was rushed to the emergency vet clinic and had the large mass in her abdomen removed.

This poor girl endured so much in her first few months of life! Her foster mom nursed her back to health. During this time, Tessa bonded with foster sister, Harper. Harper was recovering from paralysis (we still do not know what caused the paralysis). The girls have since been adopted together and are living their best lives with their new mom and dad along with their new feline siblings! Thanks to the Petfinder Foundation for helping us give Tessa a second chance at life!

St. Clair TNR & Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

We used this grant for Sierra’s lifesaving surgery at Animal Emergency Center. She needed an emergency spay.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant allowed Sierra to have a lifesaving surgery that was very unexpected. She has since recovered and has been given a second chance at life. She is looking for her forever home.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Sierra was a pregnant mama taken into our rescue in the prime of kitten season. This poor young girl was already pregnant. When she started giving birth, her foster mom knew she needed assistance, as her babies did not survive. The vet suggest an emergency spay to save her life. Thankfully, Sierra made it through the surgery and healed quickly. Right now she is searching for her forever home. After her ordeal, she knows she deserves to be spoiled by a forever family. Meet Sierra here.

Breckinridge County Animal Shelter: Petfinder Adoption Options in Action Grant (Invitation Only)
What was the money or product used for?

Restore and renovate trailer donated to animal shelter for community cat room.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It helped by allowing us to get the chairs, cat towers, beds, toys, bowls, and litter pans for inside the cat room. It also helped with supplies for the cats and storage for the supplies.

How many pets did this grant help?

10 cats are in the cat room now and many more are to come.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We have had four kittens since they were 8 weeks old and they are still with us three months later. They were getting bored in cages in the shelter and one had stopped eating. Once the cat trailer was done, we moved them all, with some others their age, out to the cat room. They have come back to life and really started to show their personalities. They all love the freedom they have to play and roam around freely. After only being out in the cat room for three days, one of the four kittens was adopted.

Humane Society of the Ohio Valley: P.L.A.Y. Pet Beds
What was the money or product used for?

We originally planned to use the P.L.A.Y. pet beds for senior dogs awaiting forever homes. As often happens in shelters, a new, more pressing need takes center stage. Our beds arrived at the start of puppy season. Two particularly miserable dog mamas-to-be were Mia and Maria. We were able to make these ladies-in-waiting more comfortable while in our care until they could deliver their puppies.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We were able to make homeless dogs more comfortable, especially late-term pregnant dogs who were struggling to get comfortable. We also use them for some of our senior dogs.

How many pets did this grant help?

12, so far.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Maria was a very pregnant beagle mix dropped off at our shelter. She was young, scared and ready to give birth any day. We twice tried to place her in a foster home because we wanted her to be comfy and not exposed to any disease or illness that could hurt her pups-to-be. But Maria darted out the door of two separate foster homes, and search parties gathered to find her. It was a difficult decision, but we decided the shelter was the safest place for her. She was very uncomfortable, so we decided to try the P.L.A.Y. beds for her. She was able to rest easy on them until being sent to rescue, where she gave birth to five little beagle-hound mixes. All have been adopted into loving homes, including Maria.