Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

Charlie's Angels Animal Rescue: Purina New Year, New Home
What was the money or product used for?

We spent the grant money on rehoming three pairs of bonded senior dogs: Cap and Perseus, Colby and Aires, and Buddy and Copper. We were able to waive the adoption fee on one of the dogs in each pair. Buddy needed heartworm treatment. Colby and Aires both required extensive treatment because one is blind and had an eye infection and both had extensive skin problems.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We were able to provide all the necessary medical treatments and were able to help the adopters afford to adopt the pairs.

How many pets did this grant help?

6

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Cap and Perseus (first photo) were both scheduled for euthanasia. They were deemed to be unadoptable because they were both so terrified of people, especially men. Our volunteer tasked with pulling dogs from the county shelter felt like both could be saved with proper care. She pulled Cap and placed him with a volunteer foster home, where he almost immediately overcame his fears. Because of that success, she then pulled Perseus and placed him with the same foster family. After a while, he began to bond with Cap, to the point where they could be walked, as long as they were together. Cap became so attached to his foster parents he would not interact with potential adopters, so the fosters adopted him. We waived the adoption fee on Perseus so he could remain with Cap.

Ada Howe Kent Memorial Shelter, Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The funds granted were used to subsidize the cost of orthopedic surgery for a 2-year-old rescued chocolate Labrador.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant helped to make it possible to cover the medical expenses associated with Khloe’s surgery. She recovered quite well and was adopted.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Khloe, a 2-year-old chocolate Labrador mix, was rescued from a high[-intake] shelter located in a rural area of Texas. She was slated to be euthanized because of overcrowding at the shelter. A rescue group fell in love with her because of her sweet and disarming personality. When she was transported to Kent Animal Shelter, it was found that she needed bilateral cruciate ligament surgery that would cost in excess of $3,500. The surgery was completed on June 26, 2018. Khloe luckily recovered quite well while in her foster home, which ultimately adopted her.

Rancho Coastal Humane Society: Cat Enrichment
What was the money or product used for?

The money was used to buy items that would enrich the lives of our shelter cats. These items included Scratch & Sniff pads, electronic motion toys, and modular cat trees.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Anything we can do to enrich the lives of our shelter cats/kittens while they are waiting for their “fur-ever” homes is important. The reaction of some of our residents to the items this grant funded verified how important it is to provide stimulating activities. Active and well-socialized cats/kittens make better adoption candidates. We are very thankful for the support from the Petfinder Foundation.

How many pets did this grant help?

We typically house up to 60 homeless cats and kittens.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Little miss Reba McEntire (first three photos) had lost virtually all interest in toys, preferring to just nap the whole day, and I was honestly a bit skeptical about whether she would even enjoy the toy. Much to my shock, she came up to the new motorized toy immediately to play with it in a way I hadn’t seen her play with anything in a long time. I left to do some work around the shelter, and when I came back into the cattery, I heard meowing and realized it was coming from Reba’s room. She was sitting there by the toy, batting it, and when she saw me, ran right up, meowing like crazy and then turning back to the toy and batting it again. So I clicked it back on for her and she immediately went right back into playing with it! Meet Reba McIntyre here.

For Mr. Feeny (fourth and fifth photos), our challenge has always been keeping him mentally stimulated and helping him burn some of his seemingly endless energy. Even with all the time staff and volunteers dedicated to playing with him, it still seems like we can’t tire this guy out. I didn’t even need to press the button on the motorized toy before he was already playing with it. Once I did turn it on, he could not get on it fast enough. He even ignored the remaining kibble in his feeder despite his love of food. It’s been nice having something that staff and volunteers can turn on after spending time with Mr. Feeny to help him get even more playtime in the day. Meet Mr. Feeny here.

Humane Society of the Ohio Valley: Purina New Year, New Home
What was the money or product used for?

This grant money was used to offset adoption fees during the months of April and May.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant allowed us to lower our adoption fees, which enticed potential adopters to visit the shelter. Once at the shelter, many folks fell in love with and adopted their new best friends. This allowed HSOV to clear several kennels and open them up for other animals who needed temporary housing.

How many pets did this grant help?

During April, 44 dogs and 26 cats were adopted. During May, 35 dogs and 32 cats were adopted.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Baine was a 4-year-old male boxer/pit bull mix who was surrendered by his owner on June 7, 2018. Although Baine was good with kids, housebroken and crate-trained, he got overlooked by potential adopters. In October of 2018, Baine was adopted. However, he proved not to be a good fit for the family and was returned. Volunteers gave him extra attention upon his return, but he seemed to be depressed and confused by what he had experienced. Baine was adopted again in November 2018 and was once again returned. His disposition turned to one of despair as he waited for his forever home. Finally, in April 2019, Baine hit the jackpot and was adopted by a family that loves and spoils him.

Heartland Animal Shelter: Purina New Year, New Home
What was the money or product used for?

The grant funds were used to waive adoption fees for senior animals (age 8+) adopted by senior citizens (age 65+).

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant allowed us to place special focus on our senior animals and help get them adopted. When senior adopters visited us, we encouraged them to meet some of our older cats and dogs who were in need of loving homes, and in most cases, these adopters found their match in a senior pet! Waiving the adoption fee as part of our Seniors for Seniors program not only brought more visitors into the shelter, but helped a number of seniors adopt our deserving senior cats and dogs who are often overlooked.

This program was an overwhelming success and we ran out of grant funds before the end of the grant period. Thanks to this grant award, we have found support in the community to help us continue this Seniors for Seniors promotion even longer. We hope to make this a permanent adoption program in the future.

Thank you, Petfinder Foundation and Nestle Purina!

How many pets did this grant help?

17

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Sparkles, a 10-year-old miniature poodle mix (first photo), came to us as a rescue from Chicago Animal Care and Control. Her mouth was in severe pain and, after seeing multiple specialists to determine the cause, it was discovered that she had lymphoma. However, her senior adopters met her and fell in love and decided they would give her the best life possible with the time she had remaining. Now, following surgery and with supportive care, Sparkles is still going strong and is happy, pain-free and loving life!

Appalachian Peace Paws Rescue: KONG Toy Grant
What was the money or product used for?

We received a box of cat toys. They were used for enrichment at adoption events.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

These toys were great for bringing shy cats out of their shells at adoption events and showing potential adopters their true personalities.

How many pets did this grant help?

70+

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

One of our special-needs cats, Tabitha (first photo), is completely blind. She is young and very playful; she loves toys that crinkle and that contain catnip. Watching her play with toys at events showed her adopter how adjusted to the blindness that she was. She was adopted.

Fayette Humane Society: Purina New Year, New Home
What was the money or product used for?

Fayette Humane Society used the 2019 Nestle Purina New Year, New Home Pet Adoption Grant from the Petfinder Foundation to offer discounted and waived adoption fees for felines. The grant subsidized adoption fees for 16 bonded kitten pairs (and one trio!), as well as reduced fees for seven singles, including older kittens and cats who had been with Fayette Humane Society for a long time and were being overlooked. We were able to waive adoption fees entirely in three cases, with another waived fee pending for a special-needs cat who is on trial with a potential adopter. There are additionally two more pending bonded pairs for whom Fayette Humane Society is offering reduced adoption fees. In total, Fayette Humane Society will have been able to adopt out 28 kittens/cats at reduced costs to adopters thanks to this grant.

While the reduced fees are enticing to potential adopters, families must of course still fill out an application and agree to comply with all aspects of the adoption contract, which helps assure that discounted/free pets are not impulsive decisions. Once a family has been approved to adopt, the discounted fee allows them to save money for future vet visits and/or toys and treats to spoil their new pet!

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The 2019 Nestle Purina New Year, New Home Pet Adoption Grant from the Petfinder Foundation helped both Fayette Humane Society and the pets in its care. We always encourage potential adopters to consider getting two kittens at the same time for a variety of reasons. Not only is it healthier for the kittens to have a constant playmate to keep them physically active and emotionally stimulated, but kittens keep each other occupied, which prevents boredom and, consequently, behavioral issues that often result in animals getting returned.

The grant also helped some of our older kittens and cats who had been with us for a while find their forever families. While they are, of course, loved by their foster families, they deserved their own homes where they could thrive as a cherished member of the family.

This also helped the overall morale of the organization, as volunteers were encouraged to see these adoptions and felt reinvigorated by the happy endings. The morale boost helps us continue our mission to save new kittens who come to take the places of those who were adopted.

How many pets did this grant help?

28

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Wilbur and Templeton (first photo, middle row) were originally with Fayette Humane Society as newborns. A foster volunteer bottle-fed and raised them until they were adopted in January. Unfortunately, the adoptive family’s circumstances changed soon after that when their new owner took a job overseas and would not be able to bring the boys with her. She surrendered Wilbur and Templeton in March, and there was not a dry eye in the house. She was devastated to not be able to keep them, and the volunteers were distraught at seeing the brothers confused and stressed by the upheaval. Because of this grant, Fayette Humane Society was able to offer bonded pairs a discounted adoption fee, and it did not take long until a new family fell in love with their sweet demeanor and beautiful coloring and quickly made the decision to adopt Wilbur and Templeton together!

Animal Rescue of the Rockies: Purina New Year, New Home
What was the money or product used for?

To cover adoption fees for some of our harder-to-adopt pets.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped to encourage adopters to consider some of our older adoptable pets and those with medical or behavioral issues.

How many pets did this grant help?

Six so far, with another 10 pets still waiting for forever homes.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Ringo is a 4-year-old black-and-white tuxedo cat who was found as a stray in a Denver, Colorado, neighborhood with a severely injured and infected front paw. Jenni Leigh, an experienced Animal Rescue of the Rockies cat foster (first photo), took him into her home. Multiple veterinary visits determined that Ringo’s paw and leg couldn’t be saved, so he underwent amputation surgery. Ringo’s behavior had been unpredictable from the day he was rescued, and although he could be the most sweet and loving cat, sometimes he unexpectedly turned into a biting, scratching little monster. Jenni was bitten and scratched by him enough to need medical attention on more than one occasion, but she didn’t give up on him. She took him to an animal behaviorist, who prescribed anti-anxiety medication for him, which he takes on a daily basis. Ringo spent more than two years in his foster home before he was finally adopted on April 29, 2019, thanks to the Purina New Year, New Home grant that covered his adoption fee. His new mom, Joan (second photo), just adores him, and so far he has been very well-behaved and seems to be thriving in his new forever home.

Greater Houston German Shepherd Dog Rescue: Senior Pet Adoption Grants
What was the money or product used for?

Funds were used to help make Monte, one of our senior dogs who had been with our rescue for over a year, more adoptable. Thanks to the grant received from the Petfinder Foundation, we were able to cover the cost to his adoptive family of five months of Adequan Canine shots and the following supplements: Platinum Performance, Movoflex joint support, and Pain Plus.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped us promote Monte’s adoption by allowing us to offer potential adopters assistance in covering the cost of the medications and supplements he needed to manage the pain and discomfort caused by an old, untreated injury. Also, by helping us get Monte adopted, we’ll now have additional resources available to help other dogs.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Monte first came to our rescue a little over eight years ago and we helped him find what we had hoped would be his forever home. Sadly, after about two years, his new mom, who had loved him dearly, passed away and he was returned to us. Monte was adopted a second time, but after five years he was once again returned to our rescue, this time as a senior with some health issues.

When Monte came back to us the second time, we were told that he had suddenly begun to have “accidents” in the house. Upon examination, we found that these “accidents” were due to crystals in his urine and a UTI, which we were able to treat through medication and a special diet. Sadly for Monte, a UTI was the least of his problems. He was also found to have damage to his left hip, right knee and an old fracture that hadn’t healed properly, leaving him with ongoing discomfort and pain. His condition could not be treated surgically, so we’ve had to manage it through medication, supplements and therapy. Due to his age and the cost to cover the lifelong care Monte needs, we received little interest from potential adopters and he remained with our rescue for over a year.

Thanks to the funding received from the Petfinder Foundation, we were able to offer assistance to his adoptive family in covering the cost of his care. He has now finally been adopted and will live out his years with a wonderful family.

Barren River Animal Welfare Association (BRAWA): Purina New Year, New Home
What was the money or product used for?

Since receiving the grant funds in March 2019, BRAWA was able to reduce adoption fees on hard-to-place dogs including special breeds such as pit bulls, disabled and senior dogs, black dogs, large dogs, and those with behavioral issues. In most cases, regular adoption fees were reduced by 50%. Signage was placed on select dogs saying “The Petfinder Foundation is Helping Me Find a Home.”

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

BRAWA operates completely on grants, donations, fundraisers, and revenue generated from adoption fees. The grant funds help offset the revenue that we lost due to the reduced adoption fees.

How many pets did this grant help?

To date, the grant has benefited 27 dogs.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Stumpy (first photo) is a 7-year-old pit bull mix weighing 70 lbs. and with three legs. For these reasons, he was often overlooked at the shelter, and the staff at BRAWA knew it would take a special family to provide the support and care he needed. He was originally adopted from BRAWA in 2017; however, he was returned to the shelter in March 2019 as a stray and his previous owner did not reclaim him. He was adopted within a week on March 23, 2019, by a family with another pit bull. They immediately fell in love with Stumpy and he was very happy to get his new family (second photo).

Barbary (third photo) is typical of the many pit bulls and similar breeds taken in at BRAWA. He came to us a stray by way of Animal Control. When he first arrived, he showed signs of neglect, had fighting scars and skin issues, and was in poor condition. He received extensive medical treatment and was at the shelter for more than two months before being adopted by a wonderful new family. His fee was reduced as a result of the Petfinder Foundation grant. He was adopted on May 17, 2019.

As you can see from the fourth photo, Cierra is very happy with her new family. A pit bull mix, she was overlooked for weeks at the shelter. She was adopted at a special off-site adoption day and her fee was reduced thanks to the Petfinder Foundation Grant. She went home with a great family — and a big smile — on May 19, 2019.

Rubble (fifth photo) is another disabled dog who benefited from the Petfinder Foundation grant. He is a boxer/shepherd mix with three legs. He was originally adopted from our shelter in 2018; however, he was returned in April 2019 due to the adopter’s personal issues. He was adopted on May 11, 2019. We also placed several other dogs with vision/hearing issues.

Yogi (sixth photo) is a large Mastiff/Boxer mix. He was an owner-surrender due to the owner’s health issues. Yogi was scared and confused about why he was at the shelter and because of his large size, he was often passed by for adoption. He was at the shelter for over a month and was adopted and benefited from the reduced adoption fee adopted on April 20, 2019.