Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

Cochise Canine Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

To help provide surgery for Madeline, an 8-year-old pug who was hit by a car and severely injured. She has had two surgeries (front leg and hernia) and will be having her third (hip and rear-leg) surgery soon.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The generous Emergency Medical Grant we received from the Petfinder Foundation enabled us to accept another needy, seriously injured animal facing euthanasia into our program.

How many pets did this grant help?

one

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Madeline, an 8- to 10-year-old little pug dog, was found hit by a car. She was taken to the Pinal (Casa Grande) pound, which has no veterinary care on-site. Madeline’s front leg was hanging, completely dislocated, and she had a huge inguinal (abdominal) hernia from the impact of the car. Her rear leg and hip also had been damaged. She languished in pain for several days. Thanks to the Petfinder Foundation’s Emergency Medical Grant, Cochise Canine Rescue was able to pull Madeline, who went to our primary foster home in Phoenix.

Her rear leg and hip will require surgery as soon as her first surgeries have fully healed. We hope the surgery will be completed in September. The total costs for these surgeries will be approximately $3,500.

As soon as Madeline is fully healed, we will be able to post her on Petfinder and find her an ideal loving home!

Top Dog Foundation: Senior Pet Adoption Grants
What was the money or product used for?

As per our request in the grant, these funds purchased Ligaplex II (a supplement to support ligament health), Nordic Naturals Fish Oil, and prescription Galliprant to support the rehabilitation of two torn ACLs (both rear legs) in Buddy, an 8-year-old feist terrier. The adopter received all supplements/prescription meds directly, approximately a 9-month supply. Buddy is doing well, and we are very hopeful that continued supplementation will allow us to avoid any surgery on his knees.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Buddy is part of a bonded pair; his best friend is Bear, a husky mix. We had very little adoption interest in them over a several-month period. Buddy also had torn ACLs in both rear knees, a factor that deterred any applicants we did receive. We were able to provide nine months of supplementation to the adoptive family via the Petfinder Foundation’s help, and add another $1,000 of support through our Bentley Vet Care Grant, which is supported by two other granting organizations. Combined, these funds provide about 15 months of supplements. With your help, Buddy and Bear were adopted in July 2019 by a family that fell in love with them.

How many pets did this grant help?

The grant directly helped one dog, Buddy, by supporting his healthy recovery and adoption. As Buddy is bonded to Bear, and we do not separate bonded pairs, it concurrently helped Bear find an adoptive home.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Buddy was adopted in July 2019. Buddy is a resilient, ever-cheerful and happy terrier mix: His tail has been likened to a metronome, waving gaily all day long. He is inseparable from his best friend, Bear, a husky mix who watches out for his smaller friend. Both dogs were surrendered to a Tennessee county animal facility in February when their person died. No adopter stepped forward in Tennessee, and the dogs came up to Minnesota-based Top Dog Foundation in March to seek adoption here.

Buddy gives every appearance of a happy, active and energetic fellow, even though vets found he had torn two ACLs in his rear legs. Given his overall health and his capacity to enjoy daily life, Top Dog Foundation — with the cooperation of its vet partners — chose to try nutrition and supplements to support Buddy’s healing to see if he could thrive and recover without surgery. (Dogs his size may actually grow new tissue that can stabilize such injuries.) Those supplements added up in costs, however, and finding an adopter to take on those costs proved difficult.

Enter the Petfinder Foundation, which provided a Senior Pet Adoption grant to help with Buddy’s adoption by purchasing nearly a year’s worth of supplements. Problem solved: In July, Buddy — with Bear — went home to a new family. Buddy’s happy “let’s go for a walk” trot was almost immediately matched by the family’s 5-year-old boy while Bear accompanied a parent nearby. We love happy new beginnings!

Frederick County Animal Control: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Funding was used to supplement our medical-care budget.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It helped pay for the cost of enucleation for one of our shelter dogs.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Karma was surrendered to the Frederick County Division of Animal Control and Pet Adoption Center by her owners, who could no longer care for her. Karma, like many surrendered pets, was overwhelmed by the shelter environment. For about four days, she lay flat on the floor of her kennel, visibly shaking and clearly frightened by the unfamiliar surroundings and caretakers. Adding to the challenge of earning her trust was the limited vision she arrived with as a result of glaucoma. Her left eye was enlarged and painful. Despite the compounded issues, we recognized the potential beneath them and chose to place her on a pathway of adoption.

The first step in transforming Karma from a scared, shaking dog was to remedy the glaucoma and make her comfortable. The only option was to perform surgery to remove her left eye completely — a procedure called enucleation. We know that pain affects the behavior of all animals, but we are never certain how they will respond to surgery, treatment, and any associated care. Karma was a perfect patient and healed remarkably well and remarkably fast, mainly because she left the surgery site alone so we had little need to restrict her access to it.

Many of us who work with animals often witness an animal who “gets it.” Those animals seem to understand that we are doing things for their benefit and, in their own way, work with us to accomplish our goal. For Karma, removing her eye also removed the pressure and pain it had been causing her.

Karma is now healed from her surgery and was adopted last week. We had restrictions on her adoption for her benefit, but also for her adoptive family’s. Her lack of vision on her left side meant she would do best in a home without small children. Even adult family members will have to learn not to sneak up on that side, as she is still acclimating to having only one eye and can be startled easily.

The Frederick County Division of Animal Control and Pet Adoption Center is an open-admission, municipal shelter with a limited budget. We are grateful to have a compassionate community and supporters like our auxiliary group, the Frederick Friends of our County Animal Shelter (FFOCAS), that provide resources beyond our given budget to help animals like Karma. We appreciate financial support from national organizations like the Petfinder Foundation, whose donors also supplement our budget and help us help animals like Karma.

New Hope Animal Rescue Center: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The money was used to cover vet bills and aftercare for a special dog named Mariah. She had a large hernia and was going to be euthanized at another shelter. We pulled her just in time and, thanks to the Emergency Medical Grant, we were able to save her.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant paid for surgery for one dog, and now we are able to use the money we would have spent saving another dog or cat who needs us.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Mariah was a senior dog at [an open-admission] shelter who had all the odds against her. Due to a large hernia, she was set to be euthanized. A volunteer saw a post by another volunteer at that shelter pleading for someone to help Mariah. She wrote about how much she deserved to live, how sweet she was and begged for help for her. We responded and quickly pulled her from the shelter. She had a large hernia that had to be fixed. Thanks to the Emergency Medical Grant from the Petfinder Foundation, she had surgery and is now healthy and ready for a forever home! Meet Mariah here.

NMDOG: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

In April 2019, NMDOG received a call from the Gallup-McKinley Humane Society in Grants, NM. They had picked up a young husky who was running with a tether around his neck. He was emaciated and had a severe injury to his right front paw. From the wound, it looked as if he had been caught in a trap. NMDOG named this husky boy Sayre, arranged transport and had him rushed to our veterinarians at Petroglyph Animal Hospital. The money from this grant provided part of the funds necessary to cover the initial cost for Sayre’s medical treatment, which was approximately $2,200 for full amputation of his right front leg.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This Petfinder Foundation Emergency Medical Grant was vital in allowing NMDOG to provide the necessary emergency care to save Sayre’s life. His leg had to be amputated, but his spirit was not broken! Without the amputation surgery, it was likely that SAYRE would have had a decreased quality of life, with a deformed foot that would have greatly affected his mobility.

Grants such as this one from the Petfinder Foundation allow NMDOG to continue to take the most needy, chained dogs in New Mexico. This grant covered approximately 45% of Sayre’s initial medical expenses!

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Sayre is a young husky mix who is great with other fun-loving and playful dogs, walks well on his leash and harness, rides great in the car, and makes friends wherever he goes!!

Sayre came to NMDOG in May of this year, after he was picked up by Gallup-McKinley County Humane Society Animal Control dragging his tether and suffering from a severe injury to his front right leg. The bones were crushed, tissue was missing, the muscles and tendons were mangled, and necrosis and infection had set in. He was completely non-weight-bearing on that leg and needed emergency medical care right away! NMDOG answered the call and secured a ride for Sayre to our vet clinic with a wonderful NMDOG volunteer.

Once Sayre arrived, he immediately stole the hearts of everyone who met him. Our medical team got him stabilized and administered IV pain meds. After x-rays were completed, it was determined that the damage was far too extensive for repair, and amputation surgery was elected. Sayre was also skinny, dirty and matted — but with all of the obstacles stacked against him, he still managed to maintain his infectious smile and fun-loving attitude toward life! After weeks of post-op recovery and rehabilitation, Sayre received a full medical clearance and is now ready to find the home he has always dreamed of: as a treasured member of his family, never to be tethered, chained or subjected to harm again.

Sayre is still available for adoption. A few weeks ago, he was on a trial adoption, but it was determined that Sayre and the resident dog were not a good fit. He wanted to play, play, play, and the resident dog would have none of that! Sayre is currently back in his foster home with his fun-loving husky foster brother! Sayre will do best in a home with another dog or two who love to romp and play! He is good with kids, but older children are preferred due to his energetic zest for life. Sayre loves to dig, so we suggest creating a digging spot or sandbox where he can dig to his little husky heart’s content. Sayre is also super, duper snuggly and has all the love in the world to give. He likes to be brushed, play in the kiddie pool, sleep with his teddy bear, have his ears rubbed and sing the song of his people! Oh, and please don’t tell Sayre he only has three legs — he honestly has no idea!

Sayre is on Petfinder!

A Taste of Heaven Sanctuary, Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Cherry-eye resolution for Teddy.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Teddy needed a simple eye surgery to improve his adoption prospects. But $300 would have been a drain on our budget for providing ongoing medical care to our existing pets. This grant enabled our organization to save Teddy and provide the surgery he needed, which resulted in his adoption!

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

In March 2019, Teddy was picked up by the local Animal Control as a stray. He had a cherry eye, which deterred any interest in his adoption. The local animal shelter does not provide “cosmetic” medical services, and he was deemed expendable. A Taste of Heaven Sanctuary believed Teddy deserved a full life and it was shameful that no one was interested in him because of a simple cherry eye. Therefore, we rescued him and applied for a grant from the Petfinder Foundation. Thanks to the Petfinder Foundation grant, Teddy’s cherry eye was removed and he was quickly adopted!

Gerda's Equine Rescue, Inc.: Senior Pet Adoption Grants
What was the money or product used for?

The money from this grant covered our senior horse Sheza’s adoption fee as well as her yearly knee injections for her arthritis.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The senior pet grant helped us find our senior horse Sheza a new home, opened up a space at the rescue so we could help another horse, and made a connection to a new foster family! Thank you, Petfinder Foundation, for helping us find great homes for our senior horses!

How many pets did this grant help?

3

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Sheza was rescued from auction and adopted, but returned a few months later for bucking under saddle. Her arthritis in her knees was bugging her more than we had realized, so we decided we needed to find her a retirement home as a companion. Sheza was with us for a few months without any interest, but within a day of our posting that her adoption fee was waived and her first year’s knee injections for her arthritis were sponsored thanks to the grant we received from the Petfinder Foundation, we found her a perfect new home! Her adopters also decided to become a foster family and are currently fostering Louise, a neglected senior thoroughbred who came from auction and needs to put weight on to get her ready for adoption. None of this would have been possible without your Senior Pet Adoption Grant! Thank you!

Demi's Animal Rescue: Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Our $992 Orvis grant is currently being used for behavior-modification training of three dogs to get them ready for adoption. We used $119.12 to purchase necessary training and enrichment tools such as four Gentle Leader head collars, four Kong toys, and training treats. The remaining $872.88 is covering the training costs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The Orvis grant is supplying these dogs with necessary behavior modification to assist in issues such as separation anxiety and under-socialization resulting in minor aggression, and to work on confidence-building. These components go beyond the standard training our dogs get – walking on a leash, potty-training, and basic commands (sit, stay, etc.). The reason for this is that these three dogs demonstrated escalated behavior issues that we feel are barriers to their adoptions. Each of these dogs has been residing in a foster home, making it easy for us to detect their behavior issues and monitor the progress they’re making. The training sessions are being completed by Marie and Tyson of Canine/Feline Behavioral Counseling, and we estimate their training will be completed by the end of September.

How many pets did this grant help?

3

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Creflo (first photo) has had a long but sheltered life. He spent his 10 years alive with one person in one home (second photo). He was not introduced to the outside world, making his new life, since his owner died, very scary. When Creflo’s owner passed away, a local shelter in Southern Colorado asked if we could bring him to Denver for a chance at adoption.

Demi’s Animal Rescue decided to bring him in and sent him to a foster who was ready to relax with an old dog. Unfortunately, within the first 24 hours, Creflo’s fear began to show through. He was refusing to get off the couch and proceeded to growl and snap at the foster parents.

He was immediately relocated to another foster home, where he spent months slowly gaining his confidence in a new environment. He progressed from refusing to go out to the yard to making it to the end of the driveway, and eventually was able to go for short walks around the block. After some time, Creflo had to once again move to another foster home for snapping and growling at the husband in the home.

This time we got Creflo into one of our most experienced foster homes that has taken behavior cases for us before. Since his arrival, he has blossomed with the other dogs, but things have continued to be a challenge, such as trying to get him in a car for vet appointments. We have found a mobile groomer to slowly work with him to trim his nails and remove his mats. While we work on a mobile vet to see if he may be in some pain due to his arthritis, Marie of Canine/Feline Behavioral Counseling is helping him adjust to the new world around him.

He is being helped to become socialized to new things and to allow people to complete tasks that are necessary for his health and quality of life.

Despite these issues, he still gets along well with other dogs and he’s really sweet – which makes us feel like he’s still worthy of being adopted to a good home.

So here’s how the trainings going to help him: Training will help him realize that his new world isn’t so scary and people are around to take care of him and help him live out the rest of his years to the fullest. Training will also help his new adopter gain the ability to get him where he needs to go and to take care of him properly by managing grooming, vet visits, nail trimmings, etc.

Given his cranky and grumpy disposition and the challenges of transporting him, the trainer comes to him.

He has not been adopted yet, but we have high hopes! And we are happy to follow up with the Petfinder Foundation once he has. Creflo’s listing can be found here.

The other two dogs who were chosen to benefit from the Orvis grant are also still in our care, but getting close to being adoption-ready! One is a small dog named Coco (third and fourth photos) whom we took from an abusive owner. We thought she was ready to be adopted, but she was quickly returned due to conflict with the other dog in the home. We are reevaluating her, as some new concerning behaviors have shown up. We are going to let her decompress and work with Marie to build her confidence so that the next home she enters will be the last! Coco’s listing is currently inactive due to the demand for her breed. We are waiting for her training to be complete before making her available and searching for the right home.

The last dog’s name is Ellie (fifth and sixth photos); she is getting help with her lack of confidence and under-socialization, which are causing concerning behaviors. She is very new to our organization and we are starting off her journey with us by letting her decompress and helping her adjust to her new surroundings while Marie guides the foster parents on how to prepare her for adoption.

Ellie’s listing can be found here.

Lee County Humane Society: Play Yard Renovation Grant
What was the money or product used for?

This funding was used to divide our large upper play yard into two smaller yards. We also added support fencing to prevent escapes and catch pens to aid in introducing new dogs to groups. We purchased oversized sun-shade sails to add much-needed shade to both play yards.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant has enabled us to expand our playgroups and also provide afternoon play sessions as well as morning sessions. Our ultimate goal is to have at least one day per week where the public is invited to see our playgroups in action. This will promote DPFL and our adoptable canines, and help educate our community on the importance of play and socialization.

How many pets did this grant help?

60

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Our superstar staff favorite, Jake, was with us for 346 days. He was semi-dog-selective and had a very high prey drive and an extremely rough, rowdy, and vocal play style. He was introduced to groups with a muzzle and was reluctant to participate at first. Slowly he realized that he could interact with the other dogs even with a muzzle. We received a sponsorship for Jake to attend a very concentrated two-week training session, which helped him learn very essential manners and also helped him curb his intense prey drive. We were slowly able to introduce him into groups without a muzzle. We watched him blossom under this new freedom and enjoyed watching him roughhouse with all his doggie friends. Jake was adopted on August 17, 2019, after almost a year in our care. Jake is a true example of success through the Dogs Playing for Life program!

Puppy Pleasers Rescue: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

The sponsorship was used towards vetting and boarding.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It helped prepare a precious pup for a home!

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

The puppy was able to be vetted and prepped for a permanent home. This big puppy was adopted! The sponsored dog was Hollywood, a chocolate Lab. From his Petfinder profile: “1.5 years old. Friendly and happy. Playful. Loves swimming. Great companion! Good with some dogs (mostly females). Does well in the home and does okay in his crate. Rides well in the car, also. Could use a little work on the leash but he is still like a puppy. He’s a good boy! He will need activities and plenty of chew toys! He is heartworm-positive but has been on the less-invasive treatment method for a few months already. Should be negative in a year! Will come with meds.”