Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

The Humane Society for Seattle/King County: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

The donation was used to support Seattle Humane’s ongoing services dedicated to keeping people and pets together. Programs include pet adoption, humane education, on-campus dog training, a pet-food bank, and spay/neuter services to low-income pet owners.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Last year Seattle Humane placed over 7,000 animals in loving homes. Every dollar counts towards funding their medical care, food, and staffing costs to care for them.

How many pets did this grant help?

The donation of $45 covered vaccines, microchip and flea medication for one animal.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Iggy, a 2-month-old Lab mix, benefited from vaccines to prepare her for adoption, a microchip to keep her from getting lost, and flea medication to keep her comfortable thanks to the Sponsor a Pet donation. She was adopted right away into a loving family.

Friends of Rescue: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

Vaccination of O’dell, a dog from Scottsboro shelter.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This specific donation helped us vaccinate a dog that was in need.

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

O’dell was at the shelter for a month, and she was becoming urgent. She is 1 year old, about 45 lbs, and is VERY gentle and loving. She gets along wonderfully with any dog we’ve tried her with, and she has the sweetest disposition and face. Loves to sit at your feet and be petted. I was able to foster her and we got her pulled from the shelter. She was vaccinated and spayed at the vet.

All Breed Rescue & Training: All-Star Dog Rescue Celebration Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The money was for our foster-dog training program. We have specifically been working with three of our harder cases: Squirt, Gessica, and Shane. Squirt and Gessica both have impulse-control and reactivity issues. Squirt is a wonderful sweet heeler mix who likes to bark at new people and vehicles. Gessica is goofy APBT mix who is very unsure of other dogs and doesn’t know her size (tending to run over people when she greets them). Shane is a deer hound mix who is scared of his own shadow and barks at a leaf swirling on the ground, but who would rather curl his long lanky frame into a cushy chair with you for reassurance than go check out the leaf.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The funds from this have helped us utilize training staff that normally are helping outside clients (to bring in support) in order to work with these three dogs. Over the last few months, they have all shown marked improvement in the negative behaviors that had prevented them from being ready for adoption.

How many pets did this grant help?

We have specifically helped three at this point and have plans for several others.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Squirt (pictured) can now wait patiently at a door when in the past he would bark and scratch to be let out. His barking behaviors have lessened to the point that he is almost ready for his forever home. He has successfully met new people without the barking, and while vehicles that are moving are still concerning to him, he is not so vocal. He is a much calmer and more confident dog. These funds have allowed us to dedicate more experienced staff to his particular case, and his improvement is joyful to see. We know that he will find a forever home because he will show better to the general public and not just be a barking “hot mess.”

Nashville Cat Rescue: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

This money was given to us via the Sponsor A Pet program.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This helped one of our long-time resident cats, Bosco, find a fabulous home!

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Bosco came from [an open-admission] shelter and wasn’t having any luck finding a forever home. He is an older cat and not a “fancy” breed — just a plain ole’ orange and white kitty. When someone paid his adoption fee through Petfinder’s Sponsor A Pet program, Bosco was finally able to find an amazing home with the perfect family!

Lucky Pup Dog Rescue: All-Star Dog Rescue Celebration Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Our grant money was used to provide vet care for our rescued pups, including Banjo, Benson, KC, Sammi, Rio, Sid and Jewells.

Thank you from the bottom of our hearts for supporting our rescue work. We were beyond thrilled to be selected for this grant, as we spent several days in San Monica for the taping of the Cause for Paws!

Lucky Pup Dog Rescue rescues the most desperate of the desperate from San Bernardino County shelters, many times dogs that other rescues don’t choose because of the expense of the vetting and health issues. The dogs we rescue tend to stay with us for extended periods of time while they heal. We aren’t high-volume, but rather select dogs who have little or no hope of being saved. We pull and transport them to safety in San Diego, about 100 miles away.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

There are really no words to express how comforting it is to know that you can take amazing care of the dogs that are in your “charge,” to know they have everything they need, from vaccinations to food to grooming, to make them more adoptable. If they have an accident, or come to us with a medical issue, we can provide the care they need to put them on a path to find an awesome home.

Our dream has been to open an adoption center in San Diego, and it looks like that is going to happen this summer! Not on the scale we originally dreamed of, but in a smaller space near our vet’s office, near La Jolla. And the BEST news of all is that the space will be donated! We can’t even believe this turn of events and how blessed we are. We hope to be open by mid-August.

How many pets did this grant help?

A dozen: the pups we describe below and others with vaccinations.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Miss KC, a gorgeous boxer-pit mix with short little legs (first photo), had demodectic mange. It looks awful but is easily cured, and just takes some time, medication and care. She is almost completely clear and looks gorgeous. Her spay had to be postponed and she will be spayed on Aug. 4 and be ready for adoption then.

Benson (second photo), sweet 4-year-old terrier mix, was rescued from San Bernardino City shelter in September after being hit by a car and never picked up by his owners. He was neutered and had a chip. He was on his last day when our puller arrived to save him. In late May, he tore his dew claw and had to be seen by vet. It was a pretty bad and painful tear. He had a great recovery and was adopted about two weeks ago!

We rescued Banjo (third photo) from San Bernardino City Shelter, where he was left by his previous owner. He was taken to the shelter’s adoption event, but not adopted. He is gorgeous 2-year-old spaniel mix with beautiful auburn fur. He has two severe cherry eyes; we had them repaired at our vet. Unfortunately, after just two weeks, the repair failed and they have returned. We knew that was a possibility, but had hoped for the best. Our vet has offered to redo them; however, they are so severe they may not be repairable. He is here in the rescue with us and can stay as long as it takes for him to be adopted.

Animal Compassion Team of CA: All-Star Dog Rescue Celebration Grant
What was the money or product used for?

A portion of the $8,000 was used to prepare a large room at our adoption center for a new indoor training center. Previously a lab with center islands and cabinetry, it is now an open and inviting area for training classes and doggy-socialization sessions. Another portion of the grant was used to hire (at reduced cost) the services of a local dog trainer (Debbie from All Ears Dog Training) to run weekly Canine Good Citizen classes for a select group of ACT shelter dogs. We have also hired her to help a dedicated volunteer work one-on-one with one of our particularly difficult dogs, Gypsy, as a model for more intensive behavior-modification techniques. There is still a large portion of the grant money left that will continue to fund further CGC classes for our shelter dogs to make them more attractive to adopters.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We haven’t quite completed the first set of trainees yet, but the response has been very encouraging and the dogs who are participating in training have shown remarkable improvement. Ten adoptable dogs of various breeds and sizes have been partnered up with volunteer trainers with the goal of learning the skills to pass the AKC’s Canine Good Citizen evaluation. Roughly half of the dogs chosen for this first class have been with us at ACT for longer than two years. The others were selected because they have some quality that makes them traditionally hard to adopt out — they’re seniors, pit bulls, or are heartworm-positive (treatable). Their profiles on our website (and Petfinder) will be updated to advertise that they are undergoing CGC training, giving them an edge to get adopted.

The skills targeted in CGC are all the things that adopters look for in a new pet: leash skills, basic obedience, good manners around new people and other dogs, etc. This allows us to share lots of positive qualities on their web profiles and is a great source of video footage for potential adopters. If the dogs are adopted before the classes conclude, adopters will be invited to complete the series of classes and earn the CGC certification with their new pet. In the meantime, the dogs thoroughly enjoy the classes and all the attention that goes with them! Dogs who started out timid and insecure around strangers and other dogs have blossomed. A few of the dogs had reactivity issues, but over time have made improvements while on-leash in a public setting. The training has definitely made all the dogs involved more adoptable; it has also given us an opportunity to learn so much about the dogs’ temperaments and personalities that we can then share with potential adopters.

Another component to this training grant is to target one dog at a time with more severe behavioral issues. Currently our trainer is working with a volunteer and Gypsy, a 3-year-old pit bull mix with extreme reactivity to other dogs and an intense fixation on toys and leashes. Because of this, she doesn’t generally get as much time in the exercise yard or with volunteers. Her behavior is also a huge obstacle to adoption.

Since beginning the one-on-one training program, Gypsy has improved remarkably. While she used to grab the leash out of our hands and not let go, she now allows us to walk her (mostly) calmly on a leash to and from the yards. She used to spend all her yard time racing along the fence line frantically barking at other dogs, but now she engages with volunteers in fetch and is correctable at the fence line. In the past, she has locked onto toys and would not release them, but now she has learned to wait before taking toys and treats and will drop them on command. Her training is not complete — she still has bouts of unmanageable behavior — but the results give us hope that, someday soon, Gypsy will be ready for a home.

How many pets did this grant help?

So far, about 11, but we have only just begun the first wave of training courses.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Bubba is a senior pit bull with an unfortunate past. He come to ACT from a rural shelter where he was picked up as a stray repeatedly over the course of a year. The last time he entered the shelter, Bubba was injured and showed obvious signs of neglect; his owners did not come to reclaim him. A staff favorite there, we were begged to rescue him from eventual euthanasia. Bubba became an ACT dog! As a naturally friendly boy with reasonably good manners, you would think that Bubba would be easy to place in a home. However, as a senior and a pit bull (with facial scarring, no less), Bubba’s profile page doesn’t get many hits.

Since beginning the Canine Good Citizen class, Bubba has been a star student. His leash manners and basic obedience have improved, he’s learned to focus on his human even with the distractions of other people and dogs, and he’s made a ton of new friends! People who were initially hesitant because of his breed and age are now comfortable with him and, while the classes aren’t over, he’s already had interest from potential adopters. We are confident that Bubba will soon find a wonderful, loving home, and that Bubba will have all the skills to make him successful once he’s in it!

Rutland County Humane Society: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

Veterinary care for shelter animals.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Paid for veterinary care

How many pets did this grant help?

5

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We recently had an extremely overweight dog come to the shelter. Our fear was that he needed weight management and that finding a home that could provide that care to help him lose weight was questionable. We needed to test his thyroid levels, which were fine, and do some other blood work on him. Now he is off to a foster home with a special diet and exercise plan. When he gets to normal weight, we can adopt him out with instructions for keeping him healthy.

Another dog at the shelter is Champ, pictured. Champ is a 1-year-old, neutered Jack Russell terrier mix. He says, “I’m a silly, friendly fella who loves being with people. I’m a lap dog and will hop up and give you a kiss or two as soon as you sit down. I’m an energetic guy who enjoys walks, hikes and other activities so I’m looking for an active family. I’ll need lots of exercise and play time so I don’t get into trouble and get into things (I did that sometimes in my previous home!). I don’t play with toys very often because I’d rather just hang out with my favorite people. I’m a little shyer and quieter than my friend Chief but I’m still an awesome guy. Chief and I were surrendered by our owner on July 3 because we were too much for her. I will need some work on house training but I’m smart so I think I’ll figure it out pretty quickly, especially when I get into a routine. My previous owner said I was good with kids but I have no known history with cats. If you have a dog at home it will be important that we meet to make sure we get along. I’m quick on my feet so you’ll need to watch the doors to make sure I don’t get out. I’m a great size for snuggling on the couch after a great day of exercise so if you think I might make a terrific addition to your home, please stop by for a visit!” Meet Champ: https://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/32692540/

SPCA of Martinsville & Henry County: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

The money was put into our spay/neuter fund to help with the cost of surgery.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

By increasing the number of animals spayed/neutered in the public, we decrease the numbers coming into the shelter for adoption.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Pawpaw is an elderly gentleman who needed special care during his neuter surgery, funded in part by the Sponsor a Pet grant. Meet Pawpaw: https://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/31792113

Humane Society of Warren County: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

Funds were used in support of Olive’s Fund. Olive’s Fund is a special fund designed to help provide for shelter pets in need of advanced medical treatments.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Benjamin Button showed up outside our shelter as a stray. He was horribly matted and ill. In addition to needing a serious grooming, Ben was suffering from bladder stones. Ben was a new man following his surgery and is now available for adoption. He’s a sweet boy who is looking for a constant companion of his own. Ben loves children, cats, and other dogs but would probably prefer a nice quiet home of his own.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Benjamin Button showed up outside of our shelter as a stray. He was horribly matted and ill. In addition to needing a serious grooming, Ben was suffering from bladder stones. Ben was a new man following his surgery and is now available for adoption. He’s a sweet boy who is looking for a constant companion of his own. Ben loves children, cats, and other dogs but would probably prefer a nice quiet home of his own.

Patches Place Cat Rescue: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

The money will be used for spaying Lady and neutering Romeo and for paying for their vaccinations.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

A large part of our expenses are spaying/neutering and vaccinations. We do not adopt out any cat or kitten that has not been spayed/neutered and vaccinated. When funds are short, we pay for these expenses out of our personal funds.

How many pets did this grant help?

Two

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Lady and her mother, Katie, were abandoned at a farm. The owner is an older gentleman with health problems and he could not take care of them. He brought them here to Patches Place after a possum attacked Katie and killed Lady’s sibling. Romeo was found abandoned in a bank parking lot; the lady who found him works in another state so she is only home on weekends. She could not take care of him so he came here and is a wonderful playmate for Lady. Pictures, in order, are Lady, Katie and Romeo.