Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

Humane Society of Southern Arizona: A Shot at Life Vaccination Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The production was 100 bordetella vaccines and was used to vaccinate 100 dogs who arrived at our facility.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant help the HSSA offset the cost of vaccinating dogs coming into our shelter against bordetella. Vaccinates are very important to sustaining a healthy environment within our shelter.

How many pets did this grant help?

100

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We don’t have one specific story about an animal this saved. However, by vaccinating for bordetella, we hopefully will see fewer dogs coming down with kennel cough and needing to be quarantined for 10 days on antibiotics. It is difficult on the dog to be in quarantine for 10 days — which is now 10 days longer that he or she has to stay at the shelter. Additionally, there is an increase in medical costs to treat the animals with antibiotics. The HSSA strongly believes in the importance of all vaccines, even if they are booster vaccines, in a shelter environment.

Hot Springs Village Animal Welfare League, Inc.: A Shot at Life Vaccination Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Vaccines provided for benefit of our shelter kittens and cats. Stray’s and ferals.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Here is one story: Brenda H. had 7 cats that we gave shots to. She is a deaf mute that has a very limited income and couldn’t afford to take her 9 cats to the vet. One of her cats is allergic to shots so we did not give that one a shot. One of her cats has urinary crystals. She had just had to have the urinary crystal cat at the vet for 3 days; because of that, she had no money left for shots. Angel Fund paid for rabies and we gave her 7 of these FVRCP shots. (Our Angel Fund is for low income hardship members of our community, who love their pets. This helps them keep them in their homes. We frequently provide food as well.)

How many pets did this grant help?

So far, 53.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Little Foot (pic 1) was a stray that showed up at the Coleman Crystal Mine. Some people who were living there in a travel trailer fed her as best they could. She had a litter of kittens around the end of January and another litter, Comet, Cupid, Noel, Rudi and Nicky about July 24. Little Foot and two of her older kittens are now barn cats. The others have been adopted or are available for adoption and all received their vaccines through this program.rnrnHemi was brought to the shelter as a baby (with his eyes still closed) with his sister. They were from a feral mom that left those two in the rain when she moved the other kittens. People rescued them out of the rain and brought them to the shelter when they figured out they didn’t know how to feed them. The sister died. Hemi survived. He was bottle fed and has been adopted.rnrnInky also came from the shelter. Some people found him as a tiny kitten on their patio. Even though he was very friendly and about 6 weeks old, no mother or other kittens were ever seen. No one ever inquired about him. He is available for adoption, but not until after Halloween because of his coloring.rnrnAlso, included is a picture of Cupid, one of the mama cat, Little Foot’s, second litter of kittens. Cupid and his brother Comet, were adopted by the same family for two little boys!rn

Maddie & Friends: A Shot at Life Vaccination Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Thank you Boehringer Ingelheim, Petfinder and The Animal Rescue Site for awarding the FVRCP vaccinations to Maddie & Friends. The vaccines were used, and continue to be used as we intake kittens – they all receive their first shot on arrival, if old enough, and they receive their booster if they haven’t been adopted by the time the shot is due. We are a small organization so only half of the vaccines are used to date (10/27/13) but the rest will be used as needed.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant greatly benefitted our organization. We are a small non profit and depend of the public for donations. Not having to purchase vaccines allowed the money that would have been spent to be used for our main mission. Our main goal at Maddie & Friends is to reduce the number of animals euthanized by offering spay/neuter clinics. We hold monthly low cost clinics for the public – funds that would have been used to purchase vaccines were at a recent spay/neuter clinic.

How many pets did this grant help?

Directly, to date, the vaccines helped 100 cats, the remaining vaccines will help additional cats as needed. Indirectly it helped 9 other cat receive spay/neuter surgery, which includes shots.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

The four kittens pictured in the first photo were tossed out in a wooded area in Mid October in Salem County, NJ – I received a call that someone had spotted them so went to look. I actually met the couple there so they could point me in the right direction. There were six kittens dumped, the couple decided to take two as pets with them. The remaining four were brought home and are currently being held for adoption. They were immediately treated for parasites and given vaccines, using vaccines provided through the grant. From left, are Georgie (female), Levi, Ace and Dutch. They had a rough start in life, being dumped in the woods, but now are looking forward to a life with a loving family.

The second picture is of a Salem City Police Officer holding a kitten. This officer happened to be on the corner while a group of school children passed. He heard a kitten cry, and asked the child to stop and open his back pack. Inside was a newborn kitten – eyes still closed. The kitten was brought to Maddie & Friends and bottle fed until ready to be adopted. The kitten was named after Officer Smith, who is often called “Smitty.” The kitten was named Smitty, and on this day, the officer came to see how the kitten he saved had grown. Little Smitty also received a vaccine which was part of the grant. He is now living with his forever family.

Humane Society of Tuolumne County: Disaster Grant
What was the money or product used for?

On August, 17, 2013, late afternoon, the HSOTC was alerted by Animal Control, the command center for pet evacuations in Tuolumne County, to prepare to house an influx of animal evacuees from the Rim Fire. The HSOTC staff immediately began moving shelter dogs from two kennels into one, and consolidating cats and kittens to open up space for evacuated canines and felines. Proactively, we reached out to Tractor Supply and Walmart with requests for food to handle the anticipated increased population. By the morning of August 18, 2013, we were ready for intake of animal evacuees and had received a pallet of food from both Tractor Supply and Walmart.

Dogs and cats immediately started arriving at our Shelter. As Animal Control took in evacuees from pet owners and rescuers, they created records on each animal and, once Animal Control kennels were at capacity, they brought animals, along with their records, to our Shelter.

From the time an animal entered our Shelter, Animal Control staff and HSOTC staff worked together to keep each animal’s record updated to ensure their best care.

We anticipated the need to take our three part-time employees to full time status, and hired an additional part-time employee to cover relief shifts. For the duration of the disaster, HSOTC staff, many of our regular volunteers, and new volunteers from the community who arrived at the Shelter wanting to help, worked virtually non-stop disinfecting kennels, cleaning cattery “condos” and litter boxes, walking dogs and making sure animals were safe, sound, and loved. From August 17 – September 4 we were unable to accept any new, non-evacuated, animals into our facility as we were at full capacity with 30 additional evacuated animals. The direct financial impact on our bottom line was in excess of $6,100. All of the animals that were in our care are now back home with their owners.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Per week, under normal circumstances, we have 1 ½ staff per shift for our cattery and 2 ½ staff per shift for our two kennels. The Rim Fire necessitated that our staffing for our cattery be increased to 2 ½ staff per shift and the kennels to 4 ½ staff per shift, plus a part-time relief worker. Given the number of evacuated animals, we had to ramp up the staff hours to compensate for the increased population over and above our normal complement of 40 – 50 animals. The direct impact on our bottom line was as follows:

• Increase staffing costs from part-time to full-time = 3 staff @ $280.00 per week or $840.00 per week. Three weeks = $2520.00
• Increase staffing costs for one part-time, on-call relief worker = 1 staff @ $280.00 per week. Two and one-half weeks = $700.00
• Cost of housing, feeding and cleaning cages for the evacuated cats @ approximately $3.73 per cat, per day = 13 cats @ 3.93 x 7 days = $357.63 per week.* Three weeks = $1072.89
• Cost of housing, feeding, cleaning cages and walking dogs 3 – 5 times per day for the evacuated dogs @ approximately $5.12 per dog, per day = 17 dogs @ 5.12 x 7 days = $609.28 per week.* Three weeks = $1827.84

*Estimates on daily costs for animals are based on food, special needs, utilities, cleaning supplies, water usage and sanitation, garbage, laundry, and are based on hard costs alone and do not reflect the help of numerous volunteers who help offset the need for additional employees.

How many pets did this grant help?

30 animals were sheltered, feed, and cared for over three weeks.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

All in all the Humane Society of Tuolumne County and Tuolumne County Animal Control ended up sheltering 59 cats, 36 dogs and two birds. Combined we fielded calls to provide resources for over 180 animals and transported for some owners in difficult circumstances. Evacuated families are under extreme stress and the welfare of their pets is a major concern. The most important thing that all involved with the care of the evacuated animals provided was peace of mind. All of us are thankful for the men and women who fought the fire, which should be fully contained by October 28, 2013, and to everyone in between who showed their community support by helping in any way possible.

Furever Home Adoption Center: A Shot at Life Vaccination Grant
What was the money or product used for?

We take in homeless animals or unwanted owner surrendered animals. We vaccinate, quarantine and place them up for adoption. The vaccines we received were used and are currently being used to vaccinate animals that we otherwise would not have had the money to accept.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We are able to save the lives of more animals due to this grant.

How many pets did this grant help?

We have taken in close to 50 cats since we received this grant.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Ajay was a cat that was found wandering around our county with an arrow through his body. He was taken to our local shelter to be euthanized, but they decided to contact our facility to inquire if we had room to provide the needed medical care for him if they invested in surgery.

After determining that the arrow had passed through his body without hitting any major organs, they operated to remove the arrow. Flies had laid eggs in his wounds and the maggots had caused major destruction of the fur and skin on his back. We were able to place him in isolation and quarantine and provide intensive medical care for him while we waited for his immune system to be healthy enough to receive vaccines.

We were able to use the vaccines given to us by this grant to immunize and protect him. He is now available for adoption and able to mingle with our other cats in our cage-free environment. The shelter named him Arrow but after seeing his courageous personality and witnessing his journey back to health, we named him AJAY, which means “victorious” 🙂

Utah Animal Adoption Center: A Shot at Life Vaccination Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The Shot at Life Vaccination grant was a donation of 100 vaccinations that have all been utilized due to our higher than usual volume of kitten litters we received this Fall at the Center.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant greatly impacted our Center at a time when we saw an influx of kitten litters entering municipal shelters desperately needing to be saved from euthanasia. The grant of 100 vaccines helped us save money on our overall medical expenses and were quickly used on our incoming kitten populations.

How many pets did this grant help?

50 kittens received initial and second booster vaccinations from this grant.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We recently received a large group of kittens from a shelter in central Utah. These kittens had not been vaccinated before we received them and were scheduled to be euthanized. Because of your funding of the vaccine donation we were able to rescue multiple litters (including the ones in the picture below) have them vaccinated and are now just awaiting the opportunity to spay and neuter them before they are offered up for adoption this holiday season.

Edgewater Animal Shelter: A Shot at Life Vaccination Grant
What was the money or product used for?

To vaccinate our in house cats and the ones brought in by Animal Control.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We did not have to purchase them which saves us money to purchase other needs for all of our Shelter Residents.

How many pets did this grant help?

Appx 50 so far….we were able to help certain pets when the people could not afford the shots.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This is Peanut and Horton…Our Copy Cats! They have been at the shelter at least a year. Peanut was adopted not long ago and is Horton still waiting on his furever home. They were both vaccinated with the complimentary vaccines from the grant. Thank you.

Humane Society of Elkhart County: A Shot at Life Vaccination Grant
What was the money or product used for?

HSEC used the product to vaccinate cats that came into the shelter as strays. We also used the product to vaccinate cats that were going up for adoption or being sent to a rescue partner.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant allowed our organization to save more lives! We were able to vaccinate cats and keep them healthy while in our care. This grant also helped us stretch our vaccination budget. Which in turn means we are able to vaccinate more cats and or kittens and make sure they stay healthy!

How many pets did this grant help?

50

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Bam-Bam came to the shelter after his owner couldn’t afford him. He is a DSH black and white cat. Bam-Bam had the perfect personality and couldn’t wait to find a forever home. HSEC prepared him for adoption and his found his furever home! Bam-Bam is completely healthy lounging around in his new home today! Stefan came into the shelter with no mommy at a very young age. With a little TLC, vaccinations, and time Stefan was available for adoption! It seems like as soon as Stefan hit the adoption floor he found a forever home. Stefan is a playful boy who received a shot at life and couldn’t be happier!

Haven Humane Society: Disaster Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Medical care for cats rescued in the Clover Fire. Cats were burned and owners had not been identified when they came into our care. We treated them and found foster homes for those who were never reunited with their owners.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It paid a significant portion of the medical costs for the cats’ pain medication, bandages, subcutaneous fluids, antibiotics, and burn cream during their treatment.

How many pets did this grant help?

Eight cats

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Our Animal Control Officers were out in the burned area looking for animals that had survived the fire. Officer Mitchell came upon a residence that was burned to the ground; nothing was standing. He saw a small pond surrounded by boulders on the property and went to check for animals. About 10 cats were hiding under the boulders. He captured three of them; the rest ran from him. He loaded them into his vehicle and brought them to our veterinary clinic. The orange cat was severely burned on his face, paws and tail. The clinic staff named him Burney. Burney’s injuries were so extensive, they were beyond what we could treat on a long-term basis at our Spay/Neuter Clinic. We transported Burney to VCA Animal Hospital, where he could get more extensive treatment. One of their veterinarians fell in love with Burney. Since she couldn’t adopt him herself, she made a pledge to find him a forever home and to offer Burney free medical care for the rest of his life.

Preventing Euthanasia Through Rescue (Maine Coon Adoptions): A Shot at Life Vaccination Grant
What was the money or product used for?

To vaccinate rescued cats prior to adoption.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We always vaccinate our rescued cats before placing them with adoptive families. We received 150 vaccines, which saved us around $300 in vaccination costs.

How many pets did this grant help?

The grant helped between 50 – 75 cats (baby kittens need 3 vaccines, kittens and adult need 2).

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Jackson and Quincy (3-4 months old) came from the Wasco shelter (east of Bakersfield). Shy and tentative, they are thriving in foster care and are ready to go home. Lulu, who is 5 – 6 years old, came out of a hoarding situation in Merced county. She loves to play. She’ll be looking out the window and all of a sudden will dive bomb the nearest toy on the floor or start batting papers around. Avy is an older girl, 12+ years old, who came out of the Los Banos shelter. She is super shy, so we hired a professional kitty behavioral consultant to help our foster work with Avy to bring her out of her traumatized state. She has a ways to go but she is responding well. Jupiter, a big boy at 15 lbs., is from the Santa Clara County shelter. He’s got a classic MC personality — laid back, easy, mellow. He loves other cats and grooms his fellow foster kittens.