Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

Adopt-A-Dog Inc.: Perkins Bordetella Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Grant monies were used to purchase vaccines such as Bordetella, materials for injection and other related costs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

All new intakes into the shelter that qualified (both non-vaccinated and pets needing boosters) were treated and properly vaccinated.

How many pets did this grant help?

Approximately 60-75 dogs

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Due to proper and routine vaccination at our shelter, kennel cough was prevented. By having the costs of vaccines covered by a grant, funds that would otherwise be dedicated to vaccinating pets can be used for other things, such as building our enrichment program, which helps reduce stresses in the kenneling environment. Also, by having the risk of kennel cough reduced, the related costs to a dog who may have contracted kennel cough have been removed, hence more monies saved for the shelter.

L.E.A.N./All Vegas Horses: Mohawk Operation Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Rehabilitation of horses taken into the L.E.A.N. rescue program, specifically feed, medical, and farriery.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Each horse we rescue requires an average of $150/month in these expenses and we have taken in six new horses in this year alone (a total of 39 since our inception in March 2012). We could not continue to take these animals from the auction/slaughter pipeline without adequate funding for care. Petfinder Foundation grants continue to help us be able to afford these costs.

How many pets did this grant help?

Six new horses in 2014

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Little Penelope is an older mare with a sweet disposition. She was picked up by Animal Control after neighbors complained that an owner had a horse with an untreated broken leg. In fact, her leg was not broken but due to fused hocks, she tended to stand with one leg cocked at an alarming angle. Either way, her owners could not afford any care to help ease her discomfort and she was considerably underweight as well. Animal Control accepted surrender from her owner. Upon x-rays funded by L.E.A.N., it was determined she simply had advanced osteoarthritis and poor conformation. She was never going to be a riding horse again, but aged only in her late teens she still had lots of love to give a family. L.E.A.N. took her into the program and placed her in the care of a new foster who is also a certified journeyman farrier. She was trimmed, received a dental for her teeth, was put on a senior grain formula, and introduced to a new herd in her foster home. A new joint formula is being used to aid in her comfort. She loves her new friends and has blossomed into a lovely, kid-friendly mare. We hope to find her a family who will accept her as a pasture pet and allow her to live out her days in peace. Until then, she enjoys top-notch care and safety in L.E.A.N.

Desert Dogs Rescue: P.L.A.Y. Pet Beds
What was the money or product used for?

All beds used on my sanctuary senior animals

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It really made a lot of forgotten senior animals more comfortable. They all loved the beds!!

How many pets did this grant help?

20

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

I was driving to work and found a mom dog who had been dumped off on the side of the road and she had just given birth to five puppies. I packed them up and took them home and the only place I had for them was the master bathtub! Your beds made it much more comfortable for them.

Ridgefield Operation for Animal Rescue: Perkins Bordetella Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The generous grant of $1,250 was/will be used to purchase bordetella vaccinations and associated veterinary expenses.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped by providing protection to our dogs and pups against kennel cough. In turn, it also helped keep our veterinary expenses down as kennel cough can be costly to treat. It also helped get our dogs adopted in a more timely manner since there was no quarantine time (which can sometimes be more that two weeks) in order to treat a dog for kennel cough.

How many pets did this grant help?

83 dogs have been/will be benefiting from this generous grant.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Nola (a 2-year-old mountain cur mix) came to ROAR on March 9 with her nine(!) 5-week-old puppies. Upon her arrival at ROAR, we found out Nola was positive for heartworm (and a skin fungus). Because she was able to immediately receive the bordetella vaccine (provided by the generous grant), kennel cough was not a worry, especially since we had to concentrate on treating the heartworms. The pups also received the bordetella vaccine and thus their very young immune systems were not compromised by kennel cough. The pictures are of Nola at her new home and three of the nine pups when they were at ROAR (all nine have been adopted).

Upper Rio Grande Animal Society: P.L.A.Y. Pet Beds
What was the money or product used for?

The 10 Special Edition Chill Pads were used to keep the shelter dogs warm during the cold winter months.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

There are two local thrift stores that donate blankets and bedding to the shelter, along with many individuals. These items are very expensive to purchase and during the winter months are very much needed to keep the dogs comfortable. The Chill beds were very helpful not only during the winter, but also when the weather is cool and damp.

How many pets did this grant help?

30

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Edward, a 2-month-old American Blue Heeler, was lucky to have been found on a street in Monte Vista, CO, during the winter when the temperatures were severely freezing. He was found by a caring individual who knew to bring him to the shelter. There is a good possibility he would have not survived. He was adopted after only spending eight days at the shelter. But not surprising … how could anyone resist this cute little guy?!

Philadelphia Animal Welfare Society: Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The grant supported PAWS’ efforts to rescue, house, care for, and adopt out homeless dogs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant enabled us to save dogs’ lives and helped to ensure that we can continue doing so for dogs who need us. Every dog rescued by PAWS receives a full medical and behavioral evaluation, spay/neuter surgery, microchip, treatments for any medical conditions it may have, as well as behavior enrichment tailored to each dog’s needs and length of stay.

How many pets did this grant help?

386

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Mona was found as a stray in South Philly in July 2013, then rescued by PAWS. Despite her wonderful personality, she waited for months for a home. This energetic girl became a staff and volunteer favorite during her stay and was always eager to play fetch and go running. Mona was adopted and now lives happily in Levittown with a father and son. She seemed so proud to become a family dog, and we were proud, too! As soon as Mona left the building, we were able to rescue a new dog to fill her kennel.

Furever Friends Rescue: Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

This grant was used to purchase vaccines – bordetella and four-in-ones for our dogs. We have also had three dogs vaccinated for rabies thanks to this grant. To date we have vaccinated 13 dogs with the four-in-one and bordetella vaccines we purchased with the Orvis Operational Grant. We will continue to vaccinate other dogs in need as they come into the rescue.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The growing elderly population in Maricopa County has fueled a desire on the part of the founders of Furever Friends Rescue to help both the individuals facing life-changing decisions and their pets. The goals of this organization are to promote animal adoption and to help reduce the number of animals euthanized in Maricopa County. Our objectives are to heighten community awareness with regard to the aging population and their needs and in addition provide homes for as many displaced pets as possible.

We have found that many of the individuals surrendering their pets are on fixed incomes and are financially incapable of keeping their pets up-to-date on their vaccines and medical care. In order to maintain the goal of our mission, we incur the costs associated with vetting the animals surrendered to us. Often that has meant dental surgery, spay/neuter and other medical issues as well as vaccinating. Having the financial wherewithal to purchase vaccines gives us the ability to help more of our target population.

How many pets did this grant help?

Thirteen so far, but we will continue to offer this valuable service to those individuals surrendering their pets to us.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Chase came to us when his owner could no longer care for him. She felt she had no other option than to surrender him to the county facility, where he faced the very real possibility of euthanasia. Chase needed a lot of help; his coat was matted and filthy, his nails were long and in need of trimming and he was not up-to-date on any of his vaccines. Thanks to the Orvis Operational Grant, we were able to get him current on his shots and ready to go to a new home. Chase has had some medical ups and downs during his stay with us, but he is heading to his new home shortly, where he’ll have a new dog friend as well as some kids to keep him busy. We couldn’t be happier for him and his new family.

Project POOCH, Inc.: Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The generous $1,000 Orvis Operational Grant received through the Petfinder Foundation enabled us to increase our community outreach through dog-adoption events. Thanks to this support, we were able to pay for staff to transport available dogs to two adoption events in April: in Lake Oswego and Clackamas; and two adoption events in May in Raleigh Hills and Sherwood – all towns in the surrounding Portland metro area.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Our kennel is unique in that it is located in a youth correctional facility. This facility is about an hour away from the Portland metro area. What this means is our ability to gain exposure for our available dogs can be limited. One of the best ways for our dogs to find new homes is to be seen by the public and for the public to have a greater awareness about our program and available dogs.

By providing funding that allowed us to participate in more adoption events, we were able to extend our reach farther into the Portland metro area than we otherwise would have had been able to afford.

How many pets did this grant help?

We take in and care for about 12 dogs at any given time. Through adoption events, dogs like Toby and Luna found, after waiting quite a while, their forever homes. For each dog adopted, space is made for another dog who might otherwise be euthanized at another shelter. All of our dogs come from area shelters where they have been waiting a while to find their forever homes, or they just need the extra attention and training our program provides.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We’d like to share Luna’s story. Luna is a special girl and she needed just the right home. Although she is beautiful and sweet, she had some specific needs that only the right home and human could provide. Luna is a Husky. She needed a person who understood her breed. She also needed a home without small animals or female dogs. So we set out to get her and her story out into the community. She was always a big hit! We knew she would be as she’s just gorgeous and loves meeting people. Luna attended both of the adoption events in April and generated a ton of interest. I think people couldn’t believe such a beautiful and well-mannered dog could come from a rescue. By having the funding from the Orvis Operational Grant through the Petfinder Foundation, we were able to bring our dogs out into the community more often so people could interact with them more easily. This in turn helped dispel some of the negative myths people have about shelter/rescue dogs.

We’re thrilled to report that, as a result of this additional exposure, Luna found her forever and perfect home. Please enjoy the photos we uploaded of Luna with her new Husky brother, Odin. We think waiting for the right home was the right decision. The Orvis Operational Grant made this possible by allowing us to continue providing Luna and all our dogs the care and training they need and deserve, and by allowing us to staff adoption events out in the community where our dogs get the exposure they need to find their forever homes.

Meridian Valley Humane Society: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

Spay surgery

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped this little girl transition into a new chapter of her life where she will no longer be bred and will be loved as she so deserves.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We used the Sponsor-A-Pet money to help pay for the spay of a 10-year-old female Min Pin who had been used as a breeder and was no longer useful to the family.

Pennington County Humane Society: Cat Castles
What was the money or product used for?

Cat Castles used for environmental enhancement of cats in cages.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The Cat Castles were/are great in some of our cages, but are too large for most of them. We have put them out in our colony rooms and replace them once every week or so as they become scratched up, torn up, squished or otherwise made unusable.

How many pets did this grant help?

30

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Right now we have a batch of five kittens who are mostly unsocialized. Putting the Cat Castle in their cage provides them with a place to “hide” and definitely reduces the amount of stress they showed before we put the castle into their cage. We even have a couple of more brave kittens hanging out in the parapet portion of the castle. This is very encourging and helpful in our socialization attempts for them.