Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

Humane Society of Summit County: Dogs Playing for Life Mentorship Grant (Invitation Only)
What was the money or product used for?

Grant funding awarded to the Humane Society of Summit County from the Petfinder Foundation supported a Dogs Playing for Life mentorship session for a member of our staff.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Grant support was instrumental in helping HSSC rejuvenate and further develop its canine playgroup program. Since completing the mentorship program, our participating staff member has relayed her new knowledge gained from the session to other Animal Care Associates, helping them to feel more confident and comfortable during playgroups. Since the beginning of February, playgroups at HSSC are now held every day, weather permitting, allowing many more of our rescued dogs to experience this highly effective enrichment and peer-to-peer socialization.

How many pets did this grant help?

100 dogs

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Ceres, a pit bull terrier mix, was rescued as a victim of animal cruelty by HSSC Humane Officers at the end of 2018. Although she recovered from her ordeal rather quickly, Ceres struggled with the common stressors within our shelter environment. New dogs, constant visitors, and a variety of unfamiliar smells and noises can be overwhelming and stressful for some rescued dogs.

Ceres’s behavior reflected her stress and anxiety. During her first few weeks in our care, she would shred, chew, and tear any blankets, beds, or toys given to her in her kennel, and, on a few occasions, she swallowed the pieces. Fortunately, she experienced no serious health complications, but all of these items were then prohibited from her enclosure for her safety.

In order to alleviate her stress, HSSC’s behavioral team began to include her in playgroup sessions. Each day, Ceres enjoys an intense play session with a few of HSSC’s other rescued dogs with compatible play style. Playgroup participation had a wonderful effect on Ceres. She is calmer in her kennel, and with a bit of time, blankets, beds, and toys have been reintroduced to her kennel. Luckily, Ceres no longer destroys them! Her stress-induced behaviors have been eliminated by her playgroup participation.

Today, Ceres is a star in playgroup! She plays well with most of the other dogs, and it’s wonderful to witness how the program has benefited her overall well-being.

Ceres is currently available for adoption at HSSC. Learn more about her on Petfinder here.

Adopt A Saint: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

The donation went towards the medical bill for Kane, a Saint Bernard.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It helped with the continued veterinary care for Kane.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Kane is a 4-year-old rough-coat male Saint Bernard who was an owner-surrender at a local shelter on April 16, 2018. He was eligible for euthanasia on April 30, so we rescued him on the 28th after being notified that he was there. As you can see from the pictures, he has a terrible skin condition that will need medical attention right away. My vet has determined he has hypothyroidism and entropion in both eyes. He also needs to be neutered. He is skin and bones, at least 50 lbs. underweight.

Upper Peninsula Animal Welfare Shelter: Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Dog enrichment toys to reduce boredom and give the dogs at the shelter mental and physical stimulation while they wait to be adopted.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Dogs enjoy having toys, and especially busy toys, to play with. The Boomer Balls work well for dogs who tend to destroy normal balls. The Tug-a-Jug toys have been really helpful — especially since we live in such a cold climate, and they give the dogs an indoor activity.

How many pets did this grant help?

400

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Bruno (pictured) is a dog who is with us now. He is VERY mistrusting of people. We had a great breakthrough with him with the help of the Tug-a-Jug slow-feeder busy toy. He started to know that good things happen with us! From his Petfinder profile: “Bruno is one handsome gentleman! His beautiful gold coat, big bright eyes and unique curly tail are absolutely stunning. But he’s not all looks; he also has the brains too! Bruno is very smart and quick to learn. He falls head-over-heels in love with the people he spends time with and is ready to learn and please them. Bruno falls so in love that sometimes he can be protective of the people he cares about, but with appropriate training is a wonderful companion dog. Bruno was good with other dogs in the past, but would likely prefer a home where he can be the only dog. He loves to go for walks but is just as great at being a couch potato. Bruno is a very big boy and would do best in a home that has big-dog experience.” Meet Bruno here.

The Animal Foundation: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The funding from the Petfinder Foundation was used to provide medical care for a dog in our shelter, Sadie, who had large masses on her abdomen, masses that we were unable to address in-house.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant gave us the ability to seek outside medical care to remove and diagnose cancerous abdominal tumors that were not only detrimental to Sadie’s health, but were also preventing Sadie from being spayed and therefore from being eligible for adoption.

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This grant helped us provide medical care for Sadie, a 3-year-old stray pit bull who arrived at The Animal Foundation in early October 2018. Although Sadie was an otherwise healthy (and happy!) dog, we discovered that she had large masses on her abdomen.

The masses were concerning for health reasons, of course, but also because they stood in the way of Sadie being spayed and therefore becoming eligible for adoption. It’s our policy that all animals adopted from The Animal Foundation are spayed or neutered before going home. We didn’t want Sadie’s health to be compromised or her wait to find her forever home to be prolonged.

The Animal Foundation doesn’t currently have the resources to provide the surgery that Sadie needed. With the generous funding from the Petfinder Foundation, we were able to arrange for Sadie to be seen by veterinarians at a partnering hospital, who removed the masses and at the same time spayed Sadie. The masses were biopsied, and the results showed that one of the masses was a malignant skin tumor that is induced by the sun. Although the tumor might reappear later, her life expectancy and quality of life should not be significantly affected.

Sadie stayed at the hospital for three and a half weeks until she finished recovering from her surgery. She returned to The Animal Foundation on Dec. 5, 2018. It didn’t take long for this happy-go-lucky girl to be discovered by her new family: She was adopted nine days later on Dec. 14. Her new mom reports that Sadie is doing well — she’s physically healthy and enjoying life in her new home. Her favorite thing to do is play games with her dad in the back yard.

Thank you for helping us help Sadie!

Second Chance Pet Adoption League, Inc.: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

All money received was used for the medical care of the dogs we rescue. This recent Sponsor a Pet 2018 Q4 check received in January was used towards surgery for Kira.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant was used to help pay for the needed surgery for Kira, a 6- to 7-month-old puppy we took in to our rescue from a local pound.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Kira had been found as an injured stray and brought to the local pound not able to bear any weight on her hind leg. X-rays revealed a completely broken femur that was beginning to heal at a 90-degree angle. A specialty surgeon had to re-break the bone and get through lots of scar tissue to insert pins so her leg would be usable.

The surgery cost over $1,500, plus Kira needs physical therapy as she heals in order to have the best chance at a full recovery. At this time, Kira needs crate rest as she heals from surgery. She is currently available for adoption into the right home. Meet Kira here.

Ingham County Animal Control: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

Funding went to purchasing enrichment toys for the long-term resident animals.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We have a number of animals being held at the shelter for a long period time due to their court case. These animals greatly benefit from enrichment toys such as puzzle feeders and other boredom-buster type toys. These toys unfortunately aren’t cheap, and aren’t indestructible, so they need to be replaced regularly, and extra funding from the Petfinder Foundation helps purchase those enrichment items.

How many pets did this grant help?

The grant funds received covered the cost of one enrichment toy.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Unfortunately since the boredom buster toys are most frequently used on court animals, photos cannot be shared. One of the dogs who likes to play with toys is Daisy, pictured. From Facebook: “Daisy is a sweet girl looking for a family who is willing to give her the time and attention she needs. She loves to play with toys and would love someone to play fetch with. She’ll be a great addition to a hound-loving family!”

Longview PAWS: Play Yard Renovation Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Our grant money was used for an additional fencing section so that we could properly introduce the dogs when they enter our play yard.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The additional fencing has allowed for a much smoother transition for our staff and volunteers and the dogs when entering the play yard for playgroup. It allows for a secure barrier for dogs to meet through the fence. Playgroup leads can easily assess body language and look for any signs of agitation or aggression safely.

How many pets did this grant help?

50+

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We run playgroups one to two times a day while we’re open to the public for adoptions. It gives potential adopters the ability to see dogs be dogs. It showcases personalities and play styles that can’t be seen within a kennel. We adopt at least one to two dogs out of our Saturday playgroups each weekend.

National Mill Dog Rescue: Senior Pet Adoption Grants
What was the money or product used for?

We used the money to cover Salsa’s adoption fee of $200 and the estimated cost of her heart medication, which is $190. Salsa and her bonded pal, Dudley, were adopted on Jan. 22, 2019. She had been with NMDR since 2014!

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It helped our organization cover a portion of the cost of rescue and care for Salsa. Any time a gift or grant is received, it gives our mission a lift so that we can keep going back for more discarded mill dogs.

It also helped her adopter make a decision to take her home, knowing the cost of her medication would be covered and the adoption fee was waived. Every incentive helps move our precious dogs to happy homes.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Salsa was a commercial breeding dog in a puppy mill for the first seven years of her life. Then, in 2014, the mill owner decided she was no more good to him. He was about to take her to one of Missouri’s notorious dog auctions when Theresa Strader of National Mill Dog Rescue stepped in to save her. Salsa is a timid Chihuahua who Theresa could see right away would not do well in a kennel setting, so she has been in a foster home for the past four-plus years. There, she bonded with Dudley, another senior foster Chi. (Here’s a video of Salsa.)

For inexplicable reasons, Salsa was one of the least viewed dogs on our and Petfinder’s websites. She was simply passed over in favor of other dogs. But when Angie Morrissey of Longmont, Colo., and her two children decided they wanted Dudley, they couldn’t bear to adopt him without Salsa, who was so dependent on him for her security.

Because Salsa was not their first choice, it really helped the family make the decision to take her when they learned there would be no adoption fee and the cost of her heart medication would be covered for the rest of her life!

Thank you, Petfinder Foundation, for helping Salsa find her forever home.

Acadiana Animal Aid: Senior Pet Adoption Grants
What was the money or product used for?

The $700 awarded to Acadiana Animal Aid is being used for Bree’s medication and wellness exams in her adoptive home.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped us promote Bree, a 7-year-old Lab who has been in our care for the past six years, for adoption. We received multiple applications and have selected one that is currently pending.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Bree arrived at Acadiana Animal Aid on March 21, 2013. Bree’s adoption will be considered a “Compassionate Adoption,” under which Acadiana Animal Aid will provide her medications and wellness exams with a waived fee. The grant funds will contribute to: Bree’s waived adoption fee, which is $200; Bree’s prescribed medications: one capsule of Fluoxetine per day and one tablet of Alprazolam as needed for severe weather anxiety; and annual wellness exams, which will include flea/tick/heartworm prevention for the year, a heartworm snap test, and DA2PP, bordetella, and rabies vaccines. Acadiana Animal Aid will provide this care for the remainder of Bree’s lifetime, expected to be four to seven more years.

After patiently waiting for her chance at a furever home for nearly six years, Bree is hoping 2019 will be her year! Bree is smart as a whip and learns like lightning. She has mastered her commands and loves to perform them! She adores leaning against her people to return hugs and gentle touches. At 7 years young, Bree is an active, affectionate, and amazing companion! She is also the lucky recipient of a wonderful grant from the Petfinder Foundation Senior Pet Adoption Program — a huge thank you to the Petfinder Foundation for supporting one of our most special girls!

Bree received multiple applications, and the most appropriate applicant for her is one of our previous adopters in Colorado. We have had multiple discussions with her about Bree’s adoption and her status is currently pending. We are currently planning a meeting between Bree and her potential family to take place within the next two months. In the meantime, we are preparing Bree by increasing the frequency of her introductions with other dogs to ensure a smooth transition and a comfortable future. Meet Bree here.

Urban Cat Coalition: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

The funds from this donation helped to spay or neuter a cat in our rescue.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

By providing spay/neuter services to all our cats, we are preventing numerous litters from being born.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This donation was made on Coco’s behalf. Coco was adopted Dec. 23, 2018, before the donation arrived. We have decided to apply the donation towards a neuter for a cat named Thomas O’Malley. He was transferred from our local animal-control facility on Jan. 22, 2019. He is currently being treated for a URI and is scheduled to be neutered on Feb. 15.