Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

Salt Lake County Animal Services: Dog Field Trips/Short-Term Fostering Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Backpacks, leashes, harnesses, “Adopt Me” vests, “Adopt Me” bandannas, “Adopt Me” leash covers, poop bags and holders, and dog water bottles.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped us get all the supplies needed for our Hounds Around Town field-trip program.
This program will help us learn more about the dogs here and get better photos, helping them get adopted faster.

How many pets did this grant help?

So far we have had 25 field trips done.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Teddy (first and second photos) was a 1-year-old Lab with LOTS of energy. Going on his Hounds Around Town adventure helped him get out and explore. He was able to go for a short hike and get a bath. He was adopted one month after arriving in the shelter.

Ramapo-Bergen Animal Refuge, Inc.: Purina One Senior Pet Adoption Assistance Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Bud and Chico’s medical costs — Galliprant (arthritis medication), kidney-diet food, benazepril, fish oil/Cosequin supplements, and thyroid medications — to help them find their forever home.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Bud and Chico’s medical costs being sponsored, in addition to “start-up” medication costs for a new home, assisted them in being adopted into an amazing home!

How many pets did this grant help?

2

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Bud and Chico needed a hospice home together after they were surrendered because their owners were moving. They were super sweet, with lots of lumps and bumps (more to love!), but at their age and condition, the vet didn’t think it was a good idea to put them through surgery. They both had really bad arthritis and we started them on pain medication. There were also signs of early kidney disease that we treated with medication and diet.

They laid quietly in their beds in the front office of RBARI, waiting. They wouldn’t typically get up or make a sound. They laid waiting, confused as to why they were living in a shelter after 13 years together in a home. They listened for the sound of a familiar voice, a sign of home, among the sounds of dogs barking and the hustle and bustle of the shelter. Bud and Chico waited for someone who would never come.

Bud and Chico were struggling. They were having a hard time getting around in the shelter. They were super sweet and low-energy. Bud desperately pawed for more love and nuzzled into anyone who took the time to sit with him. Chico quietly rested, just as desperate for attention, but too shy and nervous to ask for it. Bud and Chico didn’t deserve to live their days out in a shelter. We were desperately trying to find them a home as soon as possible and sponsored their medical care. They were quiet, sweet, mild-mannered pups who were so deserving of a compassionate family.

Bud and Chico’s new mom says it best! “Just wanted to give you an update on the little geezers. Other than diarrhea (started Centrine in addition to the metronidazole), they are doing as well as can be expected. I brought them in to work with me today for physicals, updated bloodwork and lasering. I’ve also started them on Adequan injections to see if we can make them a bit more comfortable. I’m not sure how long they will be around, but for now, they’re very happy and bright-eyed. Our set-up is probably the best for Bud as he only has two steps to go down to go outside. All four dogs are getting along just fine — Reagan (our shepherd) was even playing tug-of-war with Chico a little. Hoping to make them as happy as possible.”

Houston SPCA: Cat Enrichment
What was the money or product used for?

The Houston SPCA used Petfinder Foundation grant funds to purchase feline enrichment toys. Specifically, the organization purchased 12 Catit Senses cat feeder trees and 40 Tower of Tracks cat toys. The items have been placed in Houston SPCA cat suites and get-acquainted rooms for adoptable cats to interact with during their shelter stay.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The purchase of cat-enrichment toys helps entertain felines while they await placement into new homes. Although the Houston SPCA provides ample space, food, water, and care to all animals, cats need mental stimulation in order to be happy and healthy. Toys such as Tower of Tracks – in combination with Catit Senses feeder trees that let cats “work” for their food – help keep felines occupied. Enrichment also allows potential adopters to see the unique personalities of each cat and makes choosing their new family member much easier.

How many pets did this grant help?

785 cats/kittens

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Ari is a beautiful gray tabby who came to the Houston SPCA as an owner surrender. Her family developed allergies and could not care for her anymore. For both humans and pets, leaving home is difficult. Still, Ari’s bright personality shines through thanks to her new favorite toy. She can be found swatting at the tower balls in fascination — until somebody stops by to say hello, of course! Then, this social feline will greet visitors with a head bump. Ari was very quickly adopted by a new, loving family.

Thank you, Petfinder Foundation!

Grassroots Animal Rescue of Mississippi: Senior Pet Adoption Grants
What was the money or product used for?

We used this grant to offer an adoption incentive for Adele, a 10-year-old deaf cocker spaniel mix in our care. In order to stay healthy, Adele needs daily skin supplements and ear wash. Her skin supplement (Zesty Paws Omega Bites) come in a 90-count container, which last 45 days at her dose of two chewable supplements per day. The cost of the 90-count supplement is $25.97. The two-year cost of this supplement is $441.49. Her ear wash (Ultra-Otic Advanced Ear Cleaner plus Aloe) is $17 per bottle, and one bottle lasts about three weeks. The two-year cost of her ear wash would be $589, bringing the total cost of Adele’s supplies for two years to $1,030.49. With the Senior Pet Adoption Assistance Grant of $1,000, we were able to send two years of supplies with Adele to her new forever home (our rescue funded the remaining costs not covered by the grant). We are happy to report that Adele has been adopted!

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

See below.

How many pets did this grant help?

one

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We used this grant to offer an adoption incentive for Adele, a 10-year-old deaf cocker spaniel mix in our care. In order to stay healthy, Adele needs daily skin supplements and daily ear wash. Offering two years of Adele’s supplies as an incentive helped to relieve some of the financial pressure of adopting Adele for her new owner. We are happy to report that Adele has been adopted and is thriving in her new home in Alabama! She has a great mom and another senior dog with whom she has bonded well! This home was a perfect match for Adele, made possible in part by the generosity of the Petfinder Foundation. Thank you!

Silicon Valley Pet Project (SVPP): Purina One Senior Pet Adoption Assistance Grant
What was the money or product used for?

We are using the grant money to purchase necessary medications and prescription food for Christine, a 15-year-old dog. We have not yet exhausted the grant funds, as the medication and food purchases are spread out, and it’s only been two months since we were awarded the funds. We were awarded $850 on Nov. 25, 2019, and thus far we have used $200.21. We will continue to draw from these grant funds as Christine’s new forever family needs to purchase more food and medication. Here is a breakdown of how we have spent the money thus far:
$44.82 for Royal Canin prescription food
$155.39 for Pimobendan (Christine was diagnosed with congestive heart failure during her first post-adoption veterinary appointment, so we decided to dedicate some of the grant funding to cover her necessary heart medication)

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant has helped Christine’s new adoptive family pay for necessary medications and prescription food for Christine. As noted above, during Christine’s first post-adoption veterinary appointment, she was diagnosed with congestive heart failure (she had not had any signs of this while in our care). Given that this new development occurred immediately after Christine was adopted, we felt that we needed to cover the cost of her newly prescribed heart medication, and we determined that the best way forward was to draw from these grant funds to do so. This means that a little less money from this grant will go toward Christine’s food and the medication that we mentioned in our application, Apoquel, though we will still use grant funds to purchase these as well.

We are very much hoping that this adjustment is acceptable to the Petfinder Foundation, as it is still in the spirit of the grant, which is to provide assistance with Christine’s required medications and prescription food, and as this was a required medication expense that we did not know about when we submitted the application.

The addition of the new heart medication (Pimobendan) is helping Christine to improve her health as she adjusts to life with her new forever family. SVPP, Christine, and Christine’s adoptive family are very grateful for this assistance.

How many pets did this grant help?

Since we applied for a grant that affects a single senior pet, this grant helped one pet, Christine.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Christine is a 15-year-old West Highland white terrier (Westie). Her owners surrendered her to our local municipal shelter, San Jose Animal Care and Services (SJACS), for euthanasia. We do not know why her owners chose to give up on this sweet girl in her elderly years, but the shelter asked SVPP if we could take her, as they were not comfortable euthanizing this sweet, spirited senior.

When she came to us, Christine had alopecia (hair loss) due to flea allergies, as well as early kidney disease. We were able to provide her with the medical care she needed to stop her itching, and her hair has grown back beautifully. However, because of her flea allergies, she will need allergy medication for the remainder of her life. She is also now on a prescription kidney-disease diet, which she will require for the rest of her life.

Despite her age and her chronic conditions, she still has a lot of life and love to give. She is spunky, very sweet, and loves to meet new people. She loves children, cats, and dogs, and she adores a good nap!

Christine has been adopted, and her new family treasures her. Unfortunately, in Christine’s first post-adoption veterinary appointment, she was diagnosed with congestive heart failure (of which she had shown no signs while she was in our care).

Since this diagnosis came immediately after she was adopted, we felt that we needed to cover the cost of her new heart medication. With the help of the food and medications that this grant is funding, Christine is now thriving in her new forever home.

St. Francis Society: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

St. Francis Society received a grant for $795 for the emergency medical needs of Leipshin, a stray cat found wandering the streets with a prolapsed colon.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped us provide emergency surgery for Leipshin’s prolapsed colon.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

When a member of the community saw a stray cat with a prolapsed colon she reached out to numerous rescues for help. Only St. Francis Society answered her call for help. We immediately dispatched a volunteer to get the cat and rushed her to a veterinarian. Leipshin was rushed into emergency surgery and, fortunately, recovered quickly. However, it was discovered that, in addition to a prolapsed colon, she also suffered from terrible cases of lice, ringworm and scabies. It took her a couple of months to heal from all of her skin issues, but we are happy to report that she was adopted this weekend into a loving home!

Adams County SPCA: P.L.A.Y. Pet Beds
What was the money or product used for?

The beds are being used for the animals in our shelter and they LOVE them! Thank you!

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The beds gave the animals something soft to lie on and helped us so we didn’t have to buy new beds.

How many pets did this grant help?

More than 100

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We have a cat here named Buddy who has been here since Aug. 17, 2019, because he is waiting for his day in court! Our Humane Officer seized him as well as 38 dogs from the same house. Buddy is an older cat and LOVES his new bed. He is the black cat in the pictures. Once court is over, Buddy will placed up for adoption. I have no doubt that he will get a home!

Pets Return Home: P.L.A.Y. Pet Beds
What was the money or product used for?

We received 10 Chill Pad pet beds valued at $528.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We used these pet mats to provide a comfortable place for our dogs to rest and sleep while inside and outside.

How many pets did this grant help?

At any given time we have up to 36 dogs at our ranch. They are all socialized and share toys and sleeping and resting mats.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Our dogs come into the main house at night. They sleep on the mats on the floor and we use them in crates. Many of our dogs are happy to share. One dog in particular, Diego, is a senior dog with health problems. He has arthritis and a skin condition. Diego loved his mat it provided him a comfortable place to sleep and rest. He was recently adopted and took his mat with him to his adoptive home!

Heartland Animal Shelter: Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The funds from this grant were used to develop a structured playgroup training program. Using the knowledge obtained at our Dogs Playing for Life Mentorship program and the funds from the Orvis Animal Care grant, we were able to develop a binder of playgroup processes and procedures, create a playgroup tracking system, start a comprehensive training program and get our staff members and volunteers trained to run playgroups for all of the dogs in our care!

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant allowed us the opportunity to develop a training program so that we could teach as many staff and volunteers as possible how to safely and effectively run playgroups. Because of this, all of our dogs are now able to participate in playgroups and we have found this to make them much happier, less stressed and better socialized. Potential adopters also really enjoy seeing our dogs having a great time with other dogs while in playgroups and this has made many of them much more adoptable!

How many pets did this grant help?

250

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Zilda is a young German shepherd who had been returned to the shelter twice in less than four months. Because she had major on-leash dog reactivity and was also one of our biggest, strongest, and most energetic dogs, this posed a challenge all winter when we were walking her on the ice and with other dogs all around.

Our dog-program manager was able to use the resources from this grant to safely match Zilda with another dog, Jordie (second photo), who was also experiencing behavior issues. This match was the best we have ever seen! For months, they were able to play together daily and became the best of friends despite still not wanting to be around any other dogs. Zilda has now been adopted and there is now a silly, heart-shaped “Zilda + Jordie 4-Eva” sign hanging in the kennel to remember their friendship that developed because of our playgroup program! Jordie is still waiting for his forever home; you can meet him here.

Cats Meow Feline Fosters, Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

An Emergency Medical Grant in the amount of $920 was used toward corrective eyelid surgery for a male kitten named Simon.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The corrective eyelid surgery was needed for Simon so that he would be comfortable, and so that his vision would allow him to enjoy his life. It also made him adoptable.

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Simon came to us from the local animal control officer after he was surrendered to the shelter. At that time, shelter intake was closed, so he came directly to us. A local vet could have corrected a condition called entropion, but Simon’s condition was eyelid agenesis, which required him to see a veterinary office that specializes in disorders and diseases of animal eyes. Following his recovery and follow-up with the veterinarian after the surgery, Simon was adopted!

The surgery has allowed Simon to see better so that he can run and play in comfort.