Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

Animal Protective Association of Missouri: Pet Transfer Program
What was the money or product used for?

Pet Transfer Program

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It paid for supplies and salaries for the dogs in our Pet Transfer Program.

How many pets did this grant help?

112

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

John Jay the Shepherd mix didn’t have the easiest start to life. While his exact history is unknown, he came to The Animal Shelter of Texas County (TASTC), Missouri, as a stray who appeared to have been abused. However, he was a sweet dog who seemed eager to please, even if he didn’t have the best manners. The great staff at TASTC decided John Jay was an excellent candidate for their Puppies for Parole program.

This program brings animals in need of additional socialization or obedience training into prisons and gives inmates an opportunity to help those dogs develop skills. The dogs live in the cells with their trainers and spend hours each day developing the skills they need to become wonderful members of the family. After 3-4 months, the dogs graduate and head back to their original shelters to find new homes.

John Jay excelled at the program, and came out knowing seven new skills: sit, lie down, stay, come, shake, roll over, and play dead. Whoever adopted John Jay was getting one heck of a dog! The staff at TASTC decided that this great pup deserved the best opportunity possible to find a new home, and they transferred him to the APA. Within just five days, John Jay found a fantastic home with plenty of kids to play with and to help him stay sharp on his skills. Everyone was so happy to see this wonderful dog find the family he deserved!

Faithful Friends Animal Society: Cat Chow Building Better Lives
What was the money or product used for?

The grant money was used to offer reduced-fee adoptions in December 2014.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It allowed us to promote our adoptable cats through a reduced-fee adoption promotion in December 2014.

How many pets did this grant help?

92 cats (16 adult cats and 76 kittens)

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Floyd (first photo) came to Faithful Friends Animal Society and was named after the hurricane, as he was quite a disaster. He had a bad case of ringworm, a detached retina and needed ongoing medical care. After his ringworm cleared and his eye was removed, he was ready to start his new life. Faithful Friends was able to provide the medical care he needed and Floyd was soon in the loving arms of a new family!

Louise (second photo) was brought to Faithful Friends with a wound and, after months of quarantine, she was extremely shy and took a long time to warm up to strangers. Then, a nice lady walked in and spent some time with her. Louise immediately took to the visitor, and a match was made. Louise went from being extremely shy and scared to loving life as a lap cat!

Bogart (third photo) had a wonderful home with an owner who loved him. When his owner passed away, her family tried to care for Bogart as they knew how much he meant to their mother. But allergies prevented Bogart from remaining with the family and he was brought to Faithful Friends. Bogart was a handsome, friendly cat and lived in our manager’s office. Unfortunately, since he was a black cat and also had diabetes, he was often overlooked by visitors and potential adopters. With added marketing highlighting our diabetic cats, Bogart was featured on our Facebook page, where a loving family saw his photo and came to visit. It was love at first site! Having cared for a diabetic cat in the past, they were not fearful of any medical care and were amazed by how quickly Bogart warmed up to them. He loves the children in his life and is finally back in a loving home where he belongs.

York Adopt-A-Pet: Cat Chow Building Better Lives
What was the money or product used for?

No-fee, reduced-fee and two-for-one cat adoptions.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant enabled YAAP to place more cats and kittens into good, loving homes.

How many pets did this grant help?

29

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Jolene and her husband have a dairy farm and were wanting to adopt a few cats to live in the dairy barn and, once established, to enjoy the farm life. YAAP on occasion has rescued cats that are not well socialized and would be very happy to have the freedom of a farm. We only adopt these cats to farms where we have inspected their barns and surroundings, and know will provide food, water and a secure environment. All YAAP’s cats are spayed/neutered, tested and vaccinated prior to any adoption. Jolene’s home was perfect for Shawnee, Donna, Anya and Kendra.

Ann came to YAAP wanting to adopt a cat for her mother who had lost her cat several months ago. Ann met two cats that she loved, so she decided to not only adopt Felicity (second photo) for her Mom but to adopt Laura (third photo) for herself. It was the best of both worlds, as she would be able to see Felicity whenever she wanted and Laura and Felicity would be able to continue to be friends.

Vicki could not choose between Hadie (fourth photo) and Odie (fifth photo) and jumped at the chance to adopt both when told about YAAP’s two-for-one adoption special.

Gina had lost her beloved calico cat and asked YAAP to let her know when a calico kitten became available. A beautiful orphaned calico kitten was rescued and brought to the shelter. After the kitten spent several weeks in foster care, Gina was contacted and it was love at first sight. Prior to adoption, Gina asked that we have the kitten FELV/FIV tested prior to her taking her home. We do test all cats for FELV/FIV but per our vet it is not done until the kitten is 10-12 weeks old. Our vet agreed to test and everyone was shocked when the test came back positive for FIV. Gina did not want the kitten euthanized and wanted a second test. Blood was sent to the closest vet school and it too came back positive. Heartbroken, Gina asked that we find a home for Missouri as she had an older cat and she was afraid to bring the kitten into her home. We were able to place Missouri into a rescue that places FIV-positive cats. We are very happy to report that sweet Missouri has been adopted into a loving home where she will hopefully live a long, long life. Not long after that, a new little calico/tortie kitten was rescued and Gina was contacted. This time we can report a happy ending for Gina and Mia (sixth photo). YAAP placed Mia in Gina’s arms, telling her there would be no adoption fee. Happy endings all around!

Cat Adoption Team: Bissell Rescue U
What was the money or product used for?

Funds from the Rescue U renovation grant will help cover construction and related costs to update one of the rooms in our shelter, providing us with space that is far better utilized. We will be dividing our ringworm isolation room into two separate areas, as well as updating the kennel housing in both spaces. This construction project is part of a larger renovation in progress, and the isolation room changes are not yet complete. Currently, we are working with a contractor and architect toward completion and expect this construction to be finished in the next couple of months.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

As the needs for the cats in our community evolve over time (due to success in reducing county-shelter intake rates and increasing live-release rates), we need more flexibility in our physical space to be able to increase the number of lives we can save and to provide the highest quality of care that we can. This grant is helping us re-purpose space we already have to better meet the needs of the thousands of cats and kittens who are transferred to our shelter for adoption each year, as well as improving housing for those felines who require isolation space for ringworm treatment. Without this project, we would have to continue housing a small number of ringworm cats in a large, under-utilized room while the number of cats we take in is limited by space in a small intake area. The new flex space, with improved housing, will allow us to expand our transfer program to save more lives, and provide healthier, more comfortable space for these new cats and cats in ringworm isolation.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant will improve the lives of the thousands of cats and kittens who come into us for adoption each year, and we anticipate saving another 200 lives annually with the increased intake space.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Peaches (first photo) is a 5-month-old kitten whose beautiful fluffy coat and bright blue eyes are striking; combine that with his playful, sweet nature and you’ve got an all-around great little kitty. With high hopes for more opportunities for adoption, Peaches made the trip from the Humane Society for Tacoma & Pierce County to the Cat Adoption Team in Sherwood, OR. But instead of heading onto the adoption floor, his intake exam showed a single flaw: Peaches has ringworm. Luckily, CAT has a ringworm isolation ward where he is being treated and, once healed, he’ll be moved to an adoption area and find a loving home. Ringworm can have a long treatment time, which makes excellent housing that much more important. In order to save more lives like Peaches’, CAT needed an expanded intake area and better housing in its intake and ringworm areas. With the help of the Bissell Rescue U renovation grant, cats and kittens like Peaches will have improved housing (larger kennels — some twice the size of current kennels!) as soon as they come into the shelter — even if they need to be kenneled in a medical isolation ward.

Regis (second photo), a senior Persian mix, has got spunk that defies his age. An otherwise healthy ol’ guy, Regis transferred to the Cat Adoption Team from a local county shelter so that he could be treated for a ringworm infection. Today, he’s safely receiving treatment and as soon as he’s healed, he’ll be ready for adoption. Thanks to funds from the Bissell Rescue U renovation grant, kittens and cats like Regis will have an even better experience when they come into CAT. Grant funds are supporting a construction project that will increase CAT’s intake space, allowing the shelter to save another 200 lives a year. What’s more, those newly arrived cats, and any cats in ringworm isolation kennels, will have bigger, better housing that gives them more comfort and more room to heal.

Humane Society Adoption Center of Monroe: Bissell Rescue U
What was the money or product used for?

This grant is being used in an ongoing project to remodel our puppy area.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Our puppy area has inadequate fencing that is both too short and allows direct dog-to-dog contact between kennels. Upon completion of this project, not only will the fencing be higher and spaced appropriately to prevent dog-to-dog contact, it will also expand the area by three kennels.

How many pets did this grant help?

Thanks to this grant, upon completion our project will immediately benefit seven puppies as well as countless other puppies who will be housed in this area in the future.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Cheyenne is a hound mix puppy who was born into the unfortunate circumstance of [an open-admission] shelter. Scheduled to be euthanized within 12 hours, she was pulled into our no kill-shelter and is now housed in the area being renovated. As she grows, the higher fencing will be secure enough to keep her safely inside her area.

Emma, Sage, and Jade are a family of puppies who did not get the benefit of immunity-granting mother’s milk in their youth. Now immunocompromised, for their own safety they require housing separate from other puppies to avoid contact with germs which, although harmless to healthy puppies, could wreak havoc on their fragile bodies. Upon completion of our ongoing renovations in this area, prevention of dog-to-dog contact will be a lifesaving measure for these three puppies — a measure we could not take without the grant provided by Bissell. Although it is a complex, multi-phase project, it is far enough along that this cushion of space has been provided for these puppies.

The Pepper Foundation: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The funds were used to help a little 1-year-old Spaniel mix named Harley who came out of the shelter with pneumonia.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant was used for Harley’s emergency medicals and has helped him completely heal from his pneumonia. He is now in a foster home and they are very much in love with him and are seriously considering adopting him.

How many pets did this grant help?

It helped one doggie.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We were at the Lancaster shelter looking at another doggie when we noticed this little guy jumping up and down trying to get out of the run. He had so much life in him, but at the time we could not take another doggie. Days went by and we thought for sure since he was so cute and young he would have gotten adopted. But he did not and they were going to euthanize him, so of course we rescued him and gave him the name Harley. We noticed that after they neutered him, he began to cough non-stop and had a hard time breathing. We rushed him to our vet, where he was diagnosed with pneumonia. It was touch-and-go for five days, but he pulled through and is now the happiest, most fun-loving, adorable, tail-wagging doggie! We are so grateful for your emergency grant to help Harley and could not have done this without your help. Thank you so much, Petfinder Foundation! Harley says thank you also! xoxox

Trempealeau County Humane Society: Bissell Rescue U
What was the money or product used for?

We purchased industrial protective coating for our floors from Manhattan Coatings.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Our director and one other volunteer were able to paint the floor during the week of Thanksgiving 2013. You can see from the pictures the huge improvement in the way our floors looked. The coating helps prevent “raw paw.” The coating is urine-resistant, bacteria- and germ-resistant. Painting our floors certainly help our pets stay healthier. The coating is also skid-free, which keeps it safer for our volunteers. Painting the floor also makes the shelter more inviting when visitors arrive.

How many pets did this grant help?

It helped as many pets as passed through our doors from November of 2013 until now. Last year we sheltered 101 cats and dogs; 48 dogs and 30 cats were rehomed.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Since we used the money to paint our floors, I don’t have a specific animal story. Please look at our pictures and note our happy, healthy kitties. Zippy, the Springer Spaniel, meets a potential adopter in our office.

Cheaha Regional Humane Society: Bissell Rescue U
What was the money or product used for?

Fencing to create 29 new kennels for the adolescent and medium-size dogs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We had 10×10 kennels in a space in the back where we could keep the adolescent puppies or medium-size dogs. We had divided these into two sections, but they were old and the gauge of wiring was not good (second photo) and the dogs continually got out. This grant enabled us to get some real stand-alone kennels in these areas (first photo). The dogs are no longer able to chew through the wiring or push through and hurt themselves.

How many pets did this grant help?

We were able to build 29 kennels and this can help aproximately 40 dogs.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Lucy was a younger, medium-size brown dog in the temporary kennels in the back area. She continually went from one kennel to another and got a deep cut in her leg. We treated the wound but, because she kept escaping through the wires, it would not heal. Once we were able to get her in a new kennel, her cut healed and she was ready to go. She went to a great forever home.

All About Spay Neuter, Inc.: Cat Chow Building Better Lives
What was the money or product used for?

The grant was used to lower the adoption fees for the past two months.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

By lowering the adoption fee, we drew in many more adopters, and got many adults who have been in our care adopted. People got a chance to see how wonderful an adult cat can be and I feel the lower adoption fee made the potential adopters look at the adults.

How many pets did this grant help?

Twenty-five (25) cats and kittens found new forever homes.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

The first picture is of Nadene (now named Maya). Nadene was a kitten that was recently returned to us, since the woman got married to a man that had a dog that hated Nadene. She came back to us a little over one year old. She was not doing well at all in our shelter, being used to being an only cat. A family came in and fell in love with Nadene and now she has her forever home.

Recently a woman found six kittens, approximately four months old, in a box. She brought them to our shelter and we immediately took them to our vet to make sure they were OK. They were all in good condition except two were a little unsocial and scared. We socialized all of them, and within two weeks all six got adopted. Two were adopted in pairs and two were adopted separately. The second picture is of Gabriella and Gavin, male and female siblings that got adopted together, and the third picture is of Gunther, who was one of the single kitties that went home alone.

The fourth picture is of Denise. Denise is a beautiful kitten that was a litter of five kittens. We trapped the feral mother cat and let her nurse the kittens until they were old enough to eat on their own. All of Denise’s sibling were adopted immediately, but for some reason, Denise was overlooked. In January, Denise’s adopter walked through our doors and fell in love with her. All of our volunteers were so happy that she had finally found her forever home.

St. Louis Pet Rescue: Cat Chow Building Better Lives
What was the money or product used for?

The funds were used to allow us to offer reduced adoption fees on adult cats.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We were able to adopt adult cats at a reduced fee, which could have led to faster placement for them.

How many pets did this grant help?

25

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Lucy was picked up by animal control and thought to be pregnant. A foster from STLPR offered to take her in. Soon they realized Lucy was not pregnant and was probably taken from her kittens. Lucy was considered semi-feral. She just needed a little time and love. She soon learned the blessings of living in a warm home: never needing to worry about food again, having a warm bed to sleep in and furry and human friends to play with. Her foster mom usually does kittens, so Lucy took on the role of being resident house mom for the orphaned foster kittens she kept bringing home. Lucy was in foster care for almost two years before she was finally adopted. Lucy was very nervous at adoption events and so kept getting overlooked. Finally, the right family came in and noticed her. She now has her own family with kids to spoil her rotten.