Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

Mongomery Humane Society: A Shot at Life Vaccination Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Vaccinating adoptable animals

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Vaccinations have helped safe guard animals against infectious diseases.

How many pets did this grant help?

200

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Thelma came to our shelter in very bad shape. She had obviously suffered several years of abuse and neglect. She and her puppy captured the hearts of out staff immediately. We vaccinated her and her pup immediately. The vaccines kept them both healthy. Thelma’s puppy was adopted out immediately but Thelma had a long road ahead of her. After heartworm treatment and the amputation of her broken back leg she too has found her place in this world as a loving companion to a wonderful family. We are thankful that Thelma and her daughter were safe guarded against Parvo, distemper and kennel cough! We could not have saved them without you!

South Wood County Humane Society : A Shot at Life Vaccination Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The product was used to vaccinate our stray canine and feline population.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant allowed us to vaccinate animals and reserve our current supply for high volume intakes or special circumstances.

How many pets did this grant help?

The grant served 50 dogs and 50 cats.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Meet Tyson, the sweetest and most gentle dog. Tyson was surrendered to SWCHS because his owner could no longer care for him. He is four years old and neutered. Tyson is positive for Lymes Disease, which will need to be monitored by his new owner. Tyson is good with children but needs to be the only pet. Tyson is a gentle giant and loves to carry around his green squeaky toy.

Tyson required medical care when he arrived and was not current on vaccines. This grant helped Tyson receive an Adult 3 vaccination.

Texas Best Choices Animal Rescue: A Shot at Life Vaccination Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Vaccinations were shipped directly to us

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Vaccinations are an important part of our animal care program and are vital to keeping our pups and older dogs safe from the deadly diseases of parvo and distemper.

How many pets did this grant help?

46 dogs and puppies

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Seven labs rescued from a rural neighborhood where the family could not afford to spay their animal. We took the seven pups and the mother to make sure no more unwanted animals were born. See the seven labs. they were vaccinated three times to over the six weeks we had them and were able to rehome all of them while they were little and cute! See the seven labs at the water tub and two individual pups highlighted in Pic #2. See Leda in Pic #3 rescued from a park after over a year of feeding her and befriending her. She had likely not been vaccinated ever or in a long time. We were able to save her life and find her a forever home! See her forever family in Pic #4. She is smiling from ear to ear. Thank you Petfinder Foundation for helping us save more lives! WE LOVE PETFINDER!

North Richland Hills Animal Adoption & Rescue Center: A Shot at Life Vaccination Grant
What was the money or product used for?

We were provided vaccines for dogs and cats. These items were used to vaccinate the adoptable animals at intake to help curtail disease in the shelter. If the pet was of age for the booster and was adoptable, staff vaccinated them at intake.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant has helped us be able to start our vaccination at intake policy and the animals are healthier for it. Instead of waiting days or weeks for a pet to get selected for adoption and then vaccinating them, vaccinating at intake has helped especially the young ones stay health enough to be adopted.

How many pets did this grant help?

50 dogs and 11 cats

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Gia is a little female lab mix puppy that came to the shelter as a stray. With the vaccines that were provided, we were able to vaccinate her at intake thus increasing her chances of staying healthy and adoptable. Gia found a home with a college student and they love each other to pieces. One of the attached photos of Gia graduating puppy school.

Estill County Animal Shelter in Kentucky: A Shot at Life Vaccination Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Intake vaccinations for cats, dogs and puppies

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

They reduced the illness to .014% illness rate, or practically no illness at all. Because of this grant, I have decided to be the humane society’s Angels of Estill County and am seeking help with keeping low income animals at home — food, vaccinations, spay/neutering…all to continue to bring this shelter into the 21 century. Thanks so much.

How many pets did this grant help?

About 600

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Riley, a Catahoula hound, was vaccinated and a couple from Florida drove to KY to adopt him. I just got a followup and you should see how much happier he is (and healthier) looking.

Chouteau Pound Pals in Oklahoma: A Shot at Life Vaccination Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Vaccinating 25 dogs

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Our vet bill runs around $1,000 per month, so getting this vaccine grant greatly reduced the bill when it came to the vaccinations we provide for each dog.

How many pets did this grant help?

25

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Cookie was picked up as a stray in town on May 29, 2013. She was only 7 weeks old and very scared! We took her to our vet on May 31 and she received her first boosters from the vaccines we were awarded from this grant. She was healthy and happy and weighed 4.2 pounds! On June 15, 2013, she met her forever family and has been renamed Dainty. She looked exactly like their older dog only a lot smaller! We have received a couple of updates and she is very loved and a member of the family!

Motley Zoo Animal Rescue: A Shot at Life Vaccination Grant
What was the money or product used for?

vaccines for dogs and cats

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

we were able to vaccinate many animals with this grant (we are still using the cat vaccines), and this has greatly helped in terms of our budget. We have had a couple of emergencies that would have left us a bit strapped, but instead we had the funding for them- AND had the vaccines too. Good not to have to choose between a shot and a life!

How many pets did this grant help?

35 so far

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Tim and Adina are two cats this grant helped- they were named after the punk band Rancid…well as all the band members are guys, Adina is named after a song 🙂 The band came into town and I took the kittens down to meet their namesakes, to see if we could get a meet and greet with the band, get some cool pics…as you can see the guys were very accommodating and it was a big hit! They even put me on the guest list for the night…Tim and Adina are still looking for their home (we hope together), but with this cool publicity we have had renewed interest in them, people asking for apps…hopefully soon they can go home!

Animal Coalition of Delaware County: Pedigree Operational Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Vet care

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped to provide vet care for several dogs that were brought into our group and then later adopted out.

How many pets did this grant help?

4

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Cinder is a Beagle/Jack Russell mix that came to us in January 2013. During a health exam, our veterinarian discovered that his jaw was fractured. Because he was found as a stray, there was no way to know how his jaw was actually broken. Sadly, the vet feels that the trauma he endured was from being either hit or kicked. With the grant funds, Cinder received the vet care that was necessary to adopt him out, including taking care of the injuries to his jaw.

Ellie is a Chihuahua that was brought into our group in October 2012. Not long after she was put into a foster home, it was discovered that she was pregnant. In November, while still in foster care, she gave birth to 3 puppies – Nellie, Rocco and Coco. With the grant funds, we were able to care for Ellie throughout her pregnancy. In addition, we were able to provide vet care for the 3 puppies up until the time they were adopted. Ellie has also since been adopted.

Madison County Pet Shelter, Inc.: Pedigree Operational Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The Pedigree Foundation 2012 operational grant helped us buy dog food, vaccinate 10 dogs for rabies, and sterilize 14 dogs for low-income customers.

10 adoptions by senior citizens, $55 each
10 rabies shots, $9 each
4 dogs sterilized for low-income households, $65 each
dry dog food (Pedigree) and wet dog food (Iams), $100

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The Pedigree Foundation 2012 operational grant helped us continue to give abandoned dogs food, safety, and health. The Madison County Pet Shelter is a 501(c)(3) in a poor, rural Arkansas county where the long-engrained cultural attitude toward pets as possessions first and companions second means that our base of support is limited. The county government, which had been giving the shelter $1,000 monthly, cut its funding to $500 monthly in January 2013 because of its decreased tax revenue.

Though we had planned to use the Pedigree Foundation money for dog food, we received two unexpected gifts that changed those plans: In December 2012, three grade-school classes conducted a fundraiser from which they gave our shelter $1,000, and a local bank was so impressed with the children’s work that they gave us a $500 Walmart gift card. In March 2013, another local bank’s employees selected our shelter as that quarter’s recipient of their ongoing Jeans-on-Friday fundraiser. They gave us $1,920.

We had purchased $100 of dog food (Pedigree and Iams) during late 2012 then decided to use the Pedigree Foundation balance to support more adoptions and vaccinations through our adoption-support account, which subsidizes the cost of adoptions for qualified adopters.

How many pets did this grant help?

40 dogs, for a short while, with food; then 24 dogs with sterilization and vaccinations: The first $100 of this grant paid for dog food and so supported all the dogs in our care, or approximately 40 animals, for a while. The balance of our 2012 Pedigree Foundation operational grant was diverted to our adoption-support program after receipt of the two unexpected grants described above.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

FERGUS-RICKIE
Rickie was found near death and brought to the MCPS in March 2013. His left eye was badly damaged, he could barely walk, and his weight was so low that his hip joints were starkly evident. Caren, the shelter’s manager, took him home with her each evening for nine weeks and nursed him back to health and a good weight.

Recently, Holden, a 5-year-old boy with autism spectrum disorder, came to the shelter with his grandma and 5-year-old cousin. The boys always want to visit our shelter to see the animals when they visit their grandma. When Holden sat on the shelter floor, Rickie came right to him and stayed with Holden until he left. Holden had always been a bit leery of dogs, his grandma said, but never showed anxiety with this one. “Some dogs really seem to understand children’s needs,” she said.

Over the next several days, Holden kept talking to his Grandma Sue about Rickie. Except Holden knew Rickie’s real name: Fergus. Sue said she had read a story to Holden when he was two about a dog named Fergus, and once Holden saw Rickie, he talked non-stop about Fergus.

Of course, Holden adopted Fergus, and Grandma Sue reports that Fergus and Holden are fast friends. She said that Fergus took to his new home immediately and noted that her grandson’s ability to interact with others is improving.

We are too small and under-funded to be a no-kill facility but do not euthanize arbitrarily at X number of days. We work hard to place animals, and the Pedigree Foundation’s operational grant for 2012 helped in that effort. Holden and Fergus are deeply grateful.
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BABY
We made another seemingly fated match recently—this one between a four-foot tall female brindle wolf hybrid named Baby and James, an 18-year-old man who suffers from Lionitis (craniodiaphyseal dysplasia). These two took to each other like magnets. Baby, is hard to control on a leash for everyone but James. Now Baby sticks to James’s side, and the two have become inseparable.

By the way, Caren, shelter manager, kept tabs on Baby after adoption and learned they were feeding her Old Roy, and Baby wasn’t doing so well. Caren told the family to feed her Pedigree, and during a follow up conversation learned that Baby is thriving and will now eat only Pedigree!

Caren has learned the hard way that penny wise is pound foolish when it comes to dog food and she spreads that message. We are grateful to the Pedigree Foundation for the operational funds that helped us keep our charges healthy in 2012.
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BLONDIE
Blondie, a Great Pyrenees mixed maybe with some setter, came to the home of Denise in rural Madison County, Ark., in April 2013 with no traceable clues. But Blondie (a he, not a she) had been so well-trained and was so well-behaved that we think he might have been a service or therapy dog. When a person touched him lightly, he would stop and stay by that person’s side. Denise was heart
broken to take him to the shelter but she could not keep him. Our shelter manager found a loving home for this beautiful courteous dog, an outcome supported by the Pedigree Foundation’s generosity.
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ELIJAH
Elijah was about 10 years old and blind when someone dumped him in the rural community of Wesley. He wandered into a lady’s house and literally bumped into her porch. She brought him to us.

Our shelter manager was able to place Elijah with a big-hearted couple who took Elijah to Tulsa, Okla., for cataract surgery. They have really embraced Elijah. Here’s a recent email:

— On Fri, 6/21/13, Frank … wrote:

From: Frank …
Subject: Elijah Update
To: “caren sharp”
Date: Friday, June 21, 2013, 8:58 AM
Caren

Just wanted to send you a quick update on Elijah. He’s doing very well. His eyesight seems to be pretty good. He has a little trouble seeing things up close, but he follows us around the backyard and likes to look out the windows in the car.

I’m attaching a couple of photos for you. We took him to the groomer yesterday for a summer cut. We didn’t think he could get any cuter, but we were wrong!

Denise

Thank you, Pedigree Foundation!

Wilson County Animal Control: A Shot at Life Vaccination Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Vaccinations

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

With the vaccinations we received we were able to vaccinate all the animals that were brought into our facility.

How many pets did this grant help?

Over 100

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

On July 25, 2012 we received a call from the Wilson County Sheriff’s Department. A lady’s property was foreclosed on and she left everything including her two dogs. When we arrived there we saw two very energetic dogs come bounding towards the truck happy as could be they appeared to be Pointer mixes. When we opened the boxes on the Animal Control truck they each jumped into their own box. Being that they were so far out in the country we named them “Luke and “Bo” both health and both had been neutered, and a joy to be around and to play with.

A local rescue took “Luke” on November 13, 2012 he was adopted about 2 weeks after he got there but “Bo” didn’t get to go with him to the rescue; they didn’t want 2 dogs that looked alike. We were so happy hear that “Luke” had gotten a good forever home, and we waited an prayed that they would come and pull “Bo” too but they didn’t.

We posted Bo on Facebook, took him to adoption events had someone come in and work with him, but no one wanted “Bo”. We new “Bo” was special because of the Heart shape spot on his right side. One our officers, who would take “Bo” to the adoption events, would also take his children with him and noticed that “Bo” was very good with kids and loved all the kids that would stop to see him. We told another rescue in our area about how Bo is with children and they knew a lady who would take in foster children and wanted a dog that is good with kids. So Bo went for a trial run, we received work that as soon as he arrived he was the perfect gentleman, he greeted the lady with love and affection and all the children with the same affection and was gentle and kind and loving. Miss Betty put Bo’s bed next to hers and she said he knew immediately that it was for him and he slept there all night without a peep. She says its like he has always lived there, he even got a ride in a wagon behind a four wheeler the night before…life has taken a turn for the better for this abandoned dog.

“Bo” was with us from July 25, 2012 to April 6, 2012, 9 months, we were lucky that he never got sick. We here at Wilson County Animal Control work very hard to keep our facility clean and to keep all diseases and germs at bay. We are the 4th largest County in the State of Tennessee and cover 500 square miles, 95% of the dogs we bring into our facility are malnourished, may have the mange, most all have tape worms, fleas, and tick. There is no telling how long they have been without food, or water, or what they have been exposed too.

With the vaccinations not only can we vaccinate the adoptable dogs but can also vaccinate all dogs coming into our facility and help to prevent any diseases that may come through the facility with each dog we bring through.

“Rocky” Blue Heeler Mix 8 month old pup now lives in Indiana his new mom says he likes to go out to the barn and take a nap with the colt that is about the same age as he is.

“Romeo” a Bichon new parents called this morning and said that he love camping, fishing and riding on the boat.

“Slimm” found in a field with a bag of dog food Chihuahua mix, “Scooter” has a flea allergy no hair when we brought him in a Yorkie Mix, and “Dyna” tied to a mail box on a busy highway a Pomeranian no one ever called to claim all live here in Lebanon with a wonderful couple who love to ride their motor cycles so they all have biker names. Wanted to add Slimm, Scooter, and Dyna but maybe next time.

Thank you again for the vaccinations we have helped so many with them, and without them who knows what would have happened.