Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

All About Animals Rescue: All-Star Dog Rescue Celebration Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Microchips for 200 dogs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant gave us the opportunity to take in additional dogs into our rescue. The $2,000 that was raised by All About Animals and earmarked for microchips was spent on 20 puppies with parvo. So in addition to assisting us with 200 dog microchips, you allowed us to save an additional 20 puppies who would have died from parvo.

How many pets did this grant help?

220

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Hello, my name is Siri (first photo)! I am a very sweet, outgoing puppy. I love to be around people. I like cats and other dogs. I am also good with kids. I am even doing well with potty training. I came to AAA from the local humane society. I was all set to go up for adoption and then I got parvo. Don’t worry, one of the AAA volunteers took me home and nursed me back to health! I had so much fun playing with kitties and eating baby food. I made a full recovery and am now in my forever home!

Bandito (second photo) was rescued from the euthanasia list at the local humane society because he had parvo. One of the volunteers for All About Animals treated Bandito for his parvo and he has made a full recovery. He is a very happy and active puppy. He likes to run and play with the other dogs at his foster home. He has spent time around cats, and he tries to play with them and they are not very amused. Luckily he has been adopted into his forever home!

Amore (third photo) is a beautiful and gentle giant. She was found VERY thin and so the goal is to get some calories in her. She LOVES everyone: adults, children, dogs and cats! She has lovely manners, is house trained, does not chew and really wants to please her people. She is a couch potato and a bed potato too! She needs to be meal-fed so that she does not eat to much and get ill. She was microchipped thanks to the Petfinder Foundation grant and now lives with two cat buddies in her forever home.

Black Dog Animal Rescue, Inc.: All-Star Dog Rescue Celebration Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The grant was used to help with the extra expenses for dogs needing veterinary care above and beyond routine in order to be made available for adoption. In this case:

$943.25 was used for Angel (first photo), a senior Lab who presented with a large mass on her spleen and significant dental disease. Angel’s spleen was removed and her tumor biopsied (it was, thankfully, found to be benign), and her many broken and decayed teeth were removed.

$288.27 was used for a dental surgery for Pip (second photo), a senior Pomeranian with significant tooth decay who could not eat solid food.

$1503.16 was used to perform a tibial-plateau-leveling osteotomy surgery on Sid (third photo), a black Lab mix who could not use his leg due to orthopedic deformity. This surgery saved his leg from amputation.

$192.52 was used to help Stanley (fourth photo), a senior coonhound who presented with pancreatitis and who had to be hospitalized overnight with IV fluids.

All of these dogs have since been adopted and are thriving in their new homes.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

BDAR is committed to providing quality veterinary care to all of the animals who come into our adoption program. Whenever necessary, illnesses or injuries that affect the quality of life for an animal or that inhibit the animal’s ability to benefit from the “five freedoms” are treated and cared for prior to release for adoption.

The grant this year helped our organization provide that extraordinary care for four special dogs, all of whom have gone on to be adopted. Thank you!

How many pets did this grant help?

4

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Angel (first photo) is a 10-year-old deaf lab mix who was transferred to our adoption program after a lengthy shelter stay. Once she was anesthetized for her spay surgery, a grapefruit-sized mass was identified on her spleen. Due to Angel’s advanced age and unknown history, we opted to remove the spleen and have the tumor biopsied so that we could consider future treatment options for her as necessary.

Luckily, Angel’s tumor turned out to be a benign blood clot, possibly the result of an old injury. Once she recovered fully from that procedure, she again underwent surgery to repair significant dental disease, which involved several extractions and perhaps the first cleaning she had ever had.

Angel recovered fully and went on to be adopted by a wonderful family who, inspired by her quirky personality and fun-loving nature, changed her name to Eddie. Since she is deaf, we’re pretty sure she never noticed the difference and we are very happy she will live out the remainder of her years as a beloved family companion.

Second Chance for Homeless Pets: All-Star Dog Rescue Celebration Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Medical expenses

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped provide medical care to special-needs animals

How many pets did this grant help?

6

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Maggie is one of a litter of six who came from a shelter in a high-disease area. She was diagnosed with bronchial pneumonia and distemper. This grant provided treatment for her and all her littermates.

Animal Protective Association of Missouri: Pet Transfer Program
What was the money or product used for?

Pet Transfer Program

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This money paid for supplies, medicine and salaries for the Pet Transfer Program.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant helped 46 dogs.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Scooter, a pointer mix, originally came to the APA in early February, a transfer from our friends in Texas County, Missouri. This shy pup took some time to acclimate to the shelter environment, and he wasn’t exactly excited about his new living situation. While he was gentle and quiet, Scooter had trouble warming up to strangers, and he would typically ignore the families who tried to visit with him. Without showcasing his sweet side, Scooter was having a hard time bonding with those around him. We entered him into our PRAISE program, an enrichment program that teaches dogs basic commands as well as attention and bonding exercises. Scooter began to show off his smarts and to look forward to working with his human trainers. Those who got to know Scooter through PRAISE saw what a wonderful and affectionate dog he could be. But the problem remained: How could we find a family who would be patient enough to see the same?

One day a lovely couple named Ray and Penny came in looking for a dog. They had recently lost two of their own pups within months of each other, and they were hoping to find the perfect new pooch to love. They looked around and decided to visit with a cute little Beagle and a couple of other dogs, including Scooter. After the visit, they said the same thing that most people said when they visited Scooter: “He just ignored us.” We explained that Scooter is a quiet guy who likes to take his time getting to know people. He could be choosy about his friends, and he didn’t seem to care much for young children. They responded by saying, “Neither do we.” They left the Adoption Center that day and Scooter went back to his kennel.

First thing the next morning, Ray came back to the APA. We told him that we were sorry, but that cute little Beagle had been adopted at the end of the day yesterday. He said that was okay; he was here for Scooter. A cheer went up through the whole building! Our friend had finally found people who were willing to work with him and make him a part of their family. Ray told us that he and Penny used to work with rescued greyhounds, dogs who often need time to adjust to home life after leaving the track. They had the commitment and experience with shy dogs that Scooter needed to come out of his shell.

These days, Penny and Ray say Scooter is doing great! The pup who shied away from human companionship now loves spending his days with his retired dad, and when his mom comes home from work, he’s sure to let her know how much he missed her! Scooter even lets his new people sleep in his king-sized bed and share his sofa with him! We’re thrilled that this special dog finally found the perfect family to love!

Catahoula Rescue of New England: Houlas & Heelers, Inc.: Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The funds from the grant were used for medical care for a dog that we pulled named Pepper who was ill with heartworm.

The remaining funds were used to help with paid transports of dogs saved from the South and to also purchase travel gear (ie. Kurgo seat tethers, harnesses) to provide safe and secure transport for our own transporters.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant was huge! First we were able to provide a secondary level of care to a dog that we normally would not have been able to provide. We would have had to solicit, and hope for, donations.

In regards to the transport side of things, we were able to save dogs from two states that we have never pulled from before because of distance and to know that the dogs were safe and secure. The Kurgo gear that was purchased is insurance that we are continuing to go above and beyond to help make every transport safe for our fosters.

How many pets did this grant help?

Ten, and many more to come!

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Pepper is a little Blue Heeler who came from a very rural shelter down in the gulf of Louisiana. I learned of Pepper one night before going bed, when I checked my email one last time. An acquaintance of mine begged me to save him. He was scheduled to die the next morning at 8 a.m. and I needed to make a decision. After looking at this scrawny fella who was herding this great big Pyrenees in the shelter pen, how could I not take him? I decided to take a leap of faith. He had that something in his eye that spoke to me.

Saving Pepper came with challenges. Getting dogs from the South to New England is not easy. He originally was going to go in a different direction. But after losing two potential fosters, we found the right one for him. In the process, we discovered he had a very mild case of heartworm. This fabulous grant allowed us to provide the best testing available to give us the best prognosis and determination of care for this busy guy!

Pepper was finally adopted to a fabulous hobby-farm home. If a dog could ever truly be destined to be somewhere, it is this situation. This is the home Pepper has always been destined for. He has a fabulous new family, a job to do and a smile that goes on forever.

The Washington County Humane Society: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Medical bills for Grace, a pit bull mix who was hit by what we believe to have been a snow plow.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Grace’s bills topped out at almost $4,000. The $1,000 that we received paid for a portion of her surgery to have her eye removed.

How many pets did this grant help?

Just one – this was specifically for Grace

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

It was a cold winter Wisconsin day when a woman came into the shelter telling us of a dog in her car who had been hit by a truck or car. We assume it was a snow plow because of the hole that had penetrated her head. The dog was covered in blood, but her tail never stopped wagging! We couldn’t see much physical damage to her but knew her injuries were severe. She had major road rash on her legs, hypothermia had set in (she had been nearly frozen to the ground) and she had a perfectly round hole near her eye. Her poor head and eyes were swollen, but all she wanted to do was give kisses and be next to you. We struggled to get her to relax as we tied her to a dog bed and drove her to the emergency vet. Grace received lifesaving treatments there, but it was going to be touch-and-go for the first 36 hours. She pulled through and proved just how strong her will to survive was.

After she’d had some time to heal, we could tell something further was wrong with her eye: It was cloudy and not moving as it should. Grace was losing sight in her eye due to the muscular damage and it would be in her best interest to remove the eye. Grace was adopted the day after she was on her adoption floor and even has her own Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Gracee-Pryor/1414679835505527). Every time we look at her photos, we realize this is why we do what we do: We are truly the voice of the animals!

Richardson Rescue: Disaster Grant
What was the money or product used for?

In the middle of the night on Feb. 18, 2015, several buildings at Richardson Rescue, including the rescue office, laundry room and storage building, were engulfed in flames. Sixteen animals were killed.

After the devastation of the fire, we were able to rent and have delivered a temporary office trailer so that we could continue to rescue and adopt while we rebuild. The grant also enabled us to repair and replace destroyed kennels, tarps and shelter frames. We were also able to purchase a large storage building. There was also a pit bull badly burned by the fire, and she spent two weeks at the veterinarian’s office. The grant helped cover this bill, and she is now doing well in a happy, loving home. We had also rescued an abused poodle whom we had just removed from the office the night before the fire. She had rubber bands wrapped around each leg, which caused a terrible bone infection in her right leg. The grant enabled us to have x-rays and treat this sweetie for one month for the infection. We were also able to purchase vaccines and tests that were destroyed in the fire.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant enabled us to make repairs and get equipment to clear away the rubble left by the fire. We were able to continue our lifesaving work almost without any interruption. We treated two very needy dogs and kept our remaining pets as healthy and happy as possible during the crisis using the much-needed funds this grant provided.

How many pets did this grant help?

In addition to the two already mentioned, the grant helped us to continue to care for the 75 other pets in our care.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Sweet P is a beautiful, sweet pit bull who suffered from a severe case of Demodex. On the morning of the fire at our rescue, she received second- and third-degree burns over most of her body. She stayed at the vet’s office for two weeks to receive daily cleaning and treatment of her burns. When she returned to us, we had a couple visit with their rescue dog previously adopted from Richardson. It was love at first sight. Sweet P now lives in a home filled with love and kindness. She is completely healed and her hair is growing back beautifully. She is the first two pictures.

We also rescued a poodle who was horribly matted, with rubber bands wrapped around both front legs. She actually had dents in the bones of her right leg. It was determined she had a bone infection in her right leg. She was treated for one month for this condition and made a full recovery. She now has a loving and happy home. She is the last two pictures.

Center Valley Animal Rescue: Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The grant was requested for the purpose of restoring and expanding the current dog exercise and training yard. Due to other construction needs at the ranch, the dog yard had been shortened by more than half. CVAR used the Petfinder Foundation grant money to tear down some of the previous construction and then to put up new chain-link fence panels and two gates. The money still remaining will be used to create a passageway to the yard for one of the dog rooms.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Many of the dogs who come to CVAR have behavioral issues due to lack of training, abuse, neglect or just high energy. To help the dogs become more adoptable, CVAR provides daily exercisers, training and socialization with humans. CVAR was able to bring in a professional dog trainer on at least two recent occasions to help the volunteers learn how to approach highly anxious or badly behaved dogs to walk, exercise and train so that they can find suitable forever homes. The use of a large dog yard is crucial to this and to continuing training.

How many pets did this grant help?

17 dogs so far. There will be countless future dogs whom this grant will help.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Kieko is a high-energy coonhound/Lab mix. He came to CVAR from Thurston County, WA, where he was picked as a stray who had been in numerous fights. He came with bite wounds and an aggressive attitude toward other dogs and CVAR’s farm animals. On daily walks, Kieko would lunge at other dogs and other animals and, given his high energy and strength, some volunteers could not handle him. CVAR brought in a professional dog trainer who worked with Kieko and the volunteers at the shelter and quickly showed us all how to train him not to lunge at other animals. The training took place in and near the expanded dog yard.

Kieko has now found a new home with one of CVAR’s volunteers and continues to benefit from the training and socialization. He now exhibits more gentle behavior. Kieko always had a gentle nature about him, but his previous neglect and fights and made him wary of other animals and dogs. Time at CVAR and the training there helped him find his new, loving forever home.

The first photo is Kieko with his new mom; the second is him with dog trainer Tiffany. The third photo is Kieko in the old dog yard; the fourth is the new, expanded dog yard.

Michiana Humane Society & SPCA: Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The $1,000 grant was used for our Spay-Neuter Initiative, whereby 100% of dogs and cats adopted from the shelter are spayed or neutered before leaving. This program encourages people to adopt because they will not have the added expense of the surgery.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Our shelter is located in a community with many working-class people who watch their pennies. They may be able to provide basic care for a pet, but often the additional $50-$200 cost of a spay or neuter surgery means they cannot choose the pet they want. But our area also has a large overpopulation of unwanted animals. By guaranteeing that the surgery will be taken care of at no additional cost to the adopters, we make our dogs a better value!

How many pets did this grant help?

During the two months since we received the Orvis Operational Grant, we adopted out 44 dogs, 75% of whom needed spay or neuter surgery before leaving. The average cost of a dog surgery is running about $75, so the $1,000 grant helped get 13 dogs into new homes!

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

One specific example in a funny way is Ringo, the red Pit Bull. Ringo was surrendered to the shelter by a serial dog owner who once again found herself unable to afford her pets. At three years old, and as a Pit Bull, Ringo faced an extended stay waiting for people to adopt her. But her red coat made her unusual, and she loves people, so we sent her off to a local vet to be spayed. She came back to the shelter the next day, and a few days later we got a visit from the veterinarian and her son! It turns out Dr. Puerling really liked Ringo and had decided that she would like to adopt her! Her son agreed, and then they brought their dog for a meet-and-greet. All went well and Ringo, now Red, went to a wonderful forever home!

If not for bringing her in to be spayed, Dr. Puerling would never have met Ringo and the match would not have happened!

Animal Protective Association of Missouri: Pet Transfer Program
What was the money or product used for?

This funding supported the APA’s Pet Transfer Program.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This funding paid for program supplies, medication, utilities and staff salaries for the animals in the Pet Transfer Program.

How many pets did this grant help?

34 dogs

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Not perfect, but perfect for them: When Eddie arrived at the APA in December 2014, he was coming from a rural area where he had not learned a lot about city living. Because he had never been housetrained, and because he was not neutered, Eddie marked. And marked. Everywhere he went, Eddie left his signature. This, obviously, wasn’t the most desirable trait to see in a potential housemate. So, as with all our animals, we neutered Eddie and started working on housetraining. Eddie also hadn’t mastered a lot of basic pet skills in his life — he jumped on people and pulled on his leash — so we entered him into our PRAISE dog training program, where he did great and learned several basic commands, attention lessons, and how to just be a mellower dog around people.

Although it took a lot of time and love, our dedicated dog walkers provided Eddie both those things in abundance. They came in several days a week to work with Eddie, socialize him, and help him learn. It wasn’t a quick process, but it turned out to be just what he needed. Eddie’s energy levels became more regular, he learned how to walk more calmly on a leash, and he followed the “four on the floor” rule for dog paws.

One day in May, a man came in just to look around at dogs. He wasn’t sure what he was looking for, and he wasn’t planning to adopt anyone that day. We’re always happy to see people taking their time to carefully consider their new pets, so we encouraged him to browse as long as he liked. He left that day and came by again soon after, again just to look. About a week later, he was back, this time with his son, a young man who was very excited to meet a potential new pet. They visited with several dogs before asking to see Eddie. When Eddie came in the room he happily sniffed around for a minute before proceeding right over to the man’s leg and greeting him, Eddie-style. Needless to say, it wasn’t the best way to start a visit.

However, immediately after that misstep, Eddie walked straight over to his son and began showing him affection, licking him and having a great time being petted by him. The young man fell in love with the sweet, sleek black pup, but Eddie is a big responsibility, so the man and his son left to give some thought to the dogs they had visited.

After considering the decision for a few days, the two came back for Eddie, arriving just before we closed at 5:00. The car had barely stopped when the son jumped out of it, rushing inside to pick up his new best friend. Eddie happily greeted his new family members and posed for his adoption photo. His new dad acknowledges that it might take some time for Eddie to become fully adjusted to home life, but they’re ready and happy to work with him because he’s already made himself at home in their hearts.