Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

Homestretch Hounds, Inc: KONG Toy Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The box of toys was sent from the Kong company.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The toys were used for dogs and pups in our rescue.

How many pets did this grant help?

10

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

As we try to provide enriching activities for the dogs in the rescue waiting for homes, the toys were used for that purpose. CC (pictured, right) is a young male Catahoula leopard dog-beagle mix. CC says: “I am a fun, awesome, wonderful boy in need of a loving home! I am not exactly sure of my mix, but one thing is for sure and that is that I am a wonderful and cute boy! I was picked up as a stray by an animal shelter, but my old owner never came to get me. A place called a rescue did come for me and that is how I ended up here looking for a new home to call my own! I am only about 9 months old, still just a pup, a pup who loves to play. I currently weigh about 40 pounds and am probably full-grown or close. I love people — and I would love to be the newest addition to your family!” Meet CC: https://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/24326028/

Allegany County Animal Shelter Management Foundation: KONG Toy Grant
What was the money or product used for?

We received a grant of Kong toys for our shelter dogs. We put peanut butter in them and freeze them. They make great treats and help our dogs pass the time in the kennels.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant enhanced our kennel-enrichment program.

How many pets did this grant help?

50-60

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Little Red is a young, active dog. The Kong toys provide him much-needed mental stimulation when he is in his kennel. They allow him to focus on getting the peanut butter out of the Kong, which occupies him vs. him just lying in the kennel or barking, etc., because he is bored.

Carolina Border Collie Rescue: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

Medical care for a dog in need.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Allowed us to provide medical care.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Bailey came to Carolina Border Collie Rescue way back in February. This beautiful gal was dumped at a shelter by her owner, who said that he was “unable to confine her when she came into heat and she kept getting pregnant.” (Yep.) She was fearful, shy, underweight, depressed, needed dental surgery and was heartworm-positive. The wonderful shelter staffers took Bailey under their wing while all of us at Carolina Border Collie Rescue searched for a suitable foster home. When a spot finally opened up with one of our most experienced fosters, we scooped up Bailey and she underwent heartworm treatment and dental surgery and received lots of tender loving care from her foster mom, Ellen. We’re happy to report that beautiful Bailey recently hit the doggy jackpot with her new, permanent home! This sweet gal is very deserving of her wonderful new life. As always, endless thanks to our fosters, volunteers, donors, and adopters, as well as the shelter staff, for making this work possible!

Four Paws Rescue, Inc.: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

The funds will be used for dog and cat food.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant has helped with our pet-supplies budget.

How many pets did this grant help?

One dog and two cats

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

The adopters of Evening, a.k.a. “Evie,” write to us: We still had pain in our hearts from losing our beloved dogs Bennie (12 years) and Sage (8 years). Our 6-year-old daughter, Wren, had been asking us for some time when she would be old enough to get a puppy. Petfinder showed gorgeous heeler-mix puppies in our area! Bing! Then I realized they were in LOGAN, UTAH! Oh geez, that was way too far away from our home in Oregon. The next day I showed Erik the photo of a speckled white pup. I slept on it and the next day I called Four Paws to ask about the puppy. Suddenly it did not seem like an insurmountable task to get to Utah. I told her I was going to try and figure out a way to make it work. When we arrived, the foster mom opened the door and out spilled dogs and cats and JOY. The little white “Puppy #3” was right at the front, and as I crouched down, she climbed up on my neck and gave me puppy kisses. She was ours, from the moment I saw her photo.”

Fresno Bully Rescue: All-Star Dog Rescue Celebration Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The money from this grant was used to help pay for medical bills for dogs who were rescued with urgent needs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We are a non-profit, no-kill shelter for bully breed dogs and rely on donations from our community to keep us going. We can only rescue dogs in need if we have a kennel, a foster home, or the financial backing to pay for that dog, so we cannot always help. This grant enabled us to rescue more medically needy dogs and give them second chances.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant helped us pay for six different very medically needy doggies!

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Fergie (first photo) was spotted by a local bus driver in a field in Madera, Calif. She was hunkered down in 100-degree heat with no food or water. She only weighed about 35 pounds and her body was covered in scabs and open sores. Fergie was rushed to the vet. She was diagnosed with severe dehydration, mange, and a secondary skin infection from the untreated mange. The vet said that she had probably had the mange since she was a small puppy and that, because it had been left untreated for so long, it would likely take more than a year for her to completely heal.

We’ve had Fergie for a little over three months now and she has made amazing progress. Her scabs are all gone and she has grown back about 50% of her hair already! Fergie is a little timid at first, but her foster sister has really helped her come out of her shell. They love to do zoomies in the back yard and go to greet the horses. Fergie is full of personality and we like to call her “grumpy cat” because she is always giving a grumpy face in photos (second photo) — except with her foster sissy! Thank you for giving us the opportunity to help save her! Meet Fergie: https://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/32846760/

Hawk’s story: We got a desperate call from our vet’s office about a dog who had just been surrendered for euthanasia by his family. Hawk had been hit by a car more than a year earlier and his family never got him treatment for his wounds. His right front leg had been severely injured in the accident (third photo), and since then he had been using that leg as a cane instead of as a functioning leg. He had been in a great deal of pain since the accident, but still was just a happy, lovable dog.

We couldn’t say no to Hawk. The vet recommended that the leg be amputated due to all the scar tissue, so we went ahead with the surgery. After just a few days, Hawk was up and walking around, getting a feel for his new body (fourth photo). Now Hawk gets around just as well as any other dog and loves to romp around with his two foster sisters. Hawk is such a resilient dog and, amazingly, holds no grudges. We love our tripod boy! Meet Hawk: https://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/32599448/

Heart of Texas SPCA: Disaster Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Replacement canopies that cover the outdoor kennels.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant allowed us to replace a few of the canopies and fans damaged by the heavy rains and winds we had. Because we are an outdoor facility, these canopies are necessary to protect our dogs from the elements.

How many pets did this grant help?

30

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Tom and Jerry were rescued off a busy street on Mother’s Day by a good Samaritan. At only 10 weeks old and only about 5 lbs. each, they would not have lasted long on their own. They appear to be Chihuahua/terrier mixes. How such young, tiny babies could end up on a busy street in the middle of the city, who knows? But they are safe with us now and are looking to find a forever home that will keep them safe. Meet Tom and Jerry: https://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/32151846/

Bessie: Left at our gate with her eight puppies, this sweet girl is the best. She is about 8 years old or so, looks to have had lots of puppies in her lifetime and just wants a quiet place to call home. She seems to be house trained and crate trained, well-behaved with a loyal demeanor, she loves to play, also loves to snuggle, and never stops wagging her tail. Bessie has the sweetest personality and would make the best new family member — we hope she can find that soon, because she deserves it. Meet Bessie: https://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/31899945/

Pets & People Humane Society: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

The money was used to help with medical bills for our rescued pets like Clark.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The money was used to help care for special-needs pets like Clark.

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Our volunteers are used to seeing the horrible, usually “behind-the-scenes” realities of what some humans are capable of. But we get proven time and time again that there are still things that shock us and make us cry. One of our volunteers received a call from an animal control officer about a puppy mill bust in Canadian County, OK. She rushed over, along with two other rescues, to try to help the canine victims. There were 32 dogs total. One of the dogs was a mommy with newborn puppies, and one of the puppies was literally stuck in the mom’s hair and had to be cut out because the mom’s mats were so bad. This same mom was to later get a haircut, and rotting afterbirth was found adhered to her hair.

The dogs were absolutely in horrid condition. Pets & People took the remainder of what was left after the other rescues had taken some, and we ended up with two Borzoi and five Shih Tzu/Poodle mixes. All were unsocialized, scared, in horrible physical condition, and matted solid.

As awful as the pictures look, the reality was much worse. The small dogs weighed at least twice what they should have due to debris caught in their hair. The mats were solid, but when you lifted one up, there was another underneath, and another and another. They all had various kinds of worms and coccidiosis, but no heartworms, thank goodness. The condition of their hair probably kept mosquitoes from finding any skin to bite.

A wonderful Borzoi rescue in Texas took the Borzoi girls. Once they were over some of their initial fear, they were a little friendlier than the smaller dogs, but had severe dog aggression. Thankfully they found great homes and have a brand new life.

The little ones took longer. We got them all spayed and neutered, and they lived in a foster-home setting. They began to want to come to us for loving, but they weren’t sure, and they relied on each other for comfort. There were four boys and one girl. The female was adopted first, as she overcame her fear before the others, but the boys just couldn’t decide.

Those boys were so funny! They were like the Keystone Cops, running out to see us, touching us, running back into their crates and dancing over and over! They always made us laugh with their antics. We ended up naming them after the comic actors in the old movie The Apple Dumpling Gang: Knotts (fitting in two different ways!), Conway, Bixby, and Clark.

Finally, they were ready for homes, and one by one they were adopted. They were so happy, and the updates we get show contented dogs lying blissfully in their owners’ arms.

We always smile when we see pictures of them in their true “homes.” It is why we do what we do.

Casa del Toro Pit Bull Rescue: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

We purchased food and veterinary services for the pit bulls in our rescue.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We used the grant monies to provide lifesaving surgery for Gronk, Lenny, Poppy, and Rufus. All of these pit bulls were on the rescue-only list at the shelter and were not considered adoptable pets. Thank you so much for your generous gift. Your gift not only saved the lives of these four dogs, it lives on in the impact these dogs will have on every person who meets them.

How many pets did this grant help?

4

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We rescued Gronk (first photo) from the shelter when he was five months old. He came in as a police confiscate because someone abandoned him in a garage and a good Samaritan called Animal Care & Control. We used grant monies to repair the luxating patella in Gronk’s rear right leg. This is his first of two surgeries, as he will require surgery on his left rear leg too.

Lenny (second photo) came into the Indianapolis shelter as an injured stray. This handsome guy has such a sweet personality. We used grant monies to help fund Lenny’s heartworm treatment, dental and neuter surgeries. Lenny began his treatment in February and will be available for adoption next month. Meet Lenny: https://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/31429912/

Poppy (third photo) is a pup who just doesn’t give up. In Feb. 2014, Poppy was surrendered to the shelter by her owners because they were moving. Upon intake, the animal control officer noticed Poppy had an injured front right leg. Unfortunately, Poppy’s leg had been broken and set improperly, so the surgeon had to remove the leg in order to provide her with better mobility. Poppy, now a tripod, was adopted in March 2014 and returned to the shelter in April 2015 because her owners “didn’t have time for her.” Upon intake, the shelter noticed that Poppy was now having problems with her rear legs. They feared this would require surgery and the use of a wheelchair for recovery and therefore put Poppy on the rescue-only list. We rescued Poppy and used grant monies to provide surgery to repair ligament damage in both of her rear legs. Poppy is such a resilient pup! She didn’t require a wheelchair during her recovery; instead, her foster home helped her walk with the use of a sling. We are happy to report that Poppy was adopted this week!

The last pit bull who benefited from your generous grant was Rufus (fourth photo). Rufus was found as a stray by a good Samaritan. That person took him to an emergency vet, who performed Rufus’s first surgery and then surrendered him to the shelter. We rescued Rufus in order to provide him with the continued medical care that he required. We used grant funds to purchase food, vaccinations, neuter surgery and more to help Rufus on the road to recovery and adoption. Meet Rufus: https://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/32139671/

Rainbow Connection Animal Foundation: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

The money was applied to veterinary bills that we have accumulated for the rescue cats.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It help pay toward our veterinary bill.

How many pets did this grant help?

One.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We used the money to pay toward the vet bill that we accumulated for Mr. Bojangles’ insulin needles. He is a diabetic kitty that is in foster care. Mr. Bojangles says, “I am a super super friendly polydactyl tuxedo kitty — yes, I have awesome paws with extra toes! My paws look like little baseball mitts! I was rescued from an abandoned building on a cold winter day. Every since my rescue mom found me, I cannot stop purring! If she just looks at me I purr! I want a forever home, not one where I will be abandoned to starve and die. I am a forever cat and a 20-year commitment, so serious applicants only! My approximate d.o.b. is March 2013.

“I am currently diabetic, which requires me to have insulin injections twice a day. I’m a really good boy and let my foster mommy give me my injections, because I know they make me feel better! I was drinking a lot of water and urinating in my litterbox a lot, so my foster mom took me to the vet immediately. My vet determined that I have currently have diabetes. Sometimes this condition in cats is reversible.” Meet Mr. Bojangles: https://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/28722391/

Crossroads Animal Rescue: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

This money donated was put towards offsetting the costs of bringing an animal into our rescue. The money went towards helping decrease the costs of neutering, vaccinating, microchipping, and deworming one of our puppies who was recently brought into our rescue.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped in the process of finding our animals loving and forever homes. Grants and donations like this not only help vaccinate, medicate, and care for the animals in our rescue, they also help us market our animals to the public by taking them to adoption events. These grants also assist with the promotion of adoption and educating our community about responsible pet ownership. Through this grant we have been able to focus more on training the horses in our rescue, getting more of our animals into foster homes, and finding volunteers to spend time with the dogs and cats that come through our rescue.

How many pets did this grant help?

42 dogs, 10 cats, 6 horses, and 1 rabbit

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Since the donation was made, we have been able to find foster homes for many of the animals in our rescue, specifically Alladdin (first photo), a Labrador retriever/Plott hound puppy. Alladdin and his five siblings came to CARE after being rescued from the local shelter. These sweet puppies had been outgoing and happy from the start and we have thankfully found homes for four of them since. Only Alladdin and his brother Genie are left and they are currently in foster homes getting all of the love and care they deserve.

Another success story is that of Louie and Lucas (second photo), two brothers who were brought into our rescue as orphaned kittens. This adorable pair was rescued from the local shelter when they were only about three weeks old, after their mother and siblings had died. A volunteer with our rescue bottle-fed them every day until they were old enough to eat kitten food. Louie and Lucas formed an inseparable bond, and the volunteer who bottle-fed them adopted them together shortly thereafter. They now have the good life and enjoy scaling furniture and watching their beta fish friend swim around in his tank.

Finally, sweet Penny (third photo), a 3-year-old pointer mix, had recently been returned to our rescue after being adopted out last year due to a change in her owner’s circumstance. Unfortunately Penny was being overlooked due to the fact that she was not a puppy, even though she was incredibly sweet and loved to go on walks and hikes with our volunteers. During an adoption event weekend, Penny’s luck changed and she was adopted by a wonderful family who have spoiled her ever since.