Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

Lakeshore Humane Society: Purina and Amazon Treats for the Holidays
What was the money or product used for?

The 11 cases of Friskies Party Mix cat treats and 20 cases of Beggin’ Strips dog treats were used in multiple ways. At the shelter, treats are used to gain the trust of timid or fearful animals and as rewards for good behavior, tools for behavior training, reinforcement for housetraining, and to make the dogs and cats happy and show them someone cares.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The gift of treats from the Petfinder Foundation, Purina and Amazon allowed us to provide the shelter cats and dogs with a little something special to brighten their holidays, with a little extra to keep them happy while waiting for their forever homes and families.

How many pets did this grant help?

Due to the large amount of treats received, we were able to help all the animals in the shelter during the holidays and continue to provide treats to the animals who have come through our doors since.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Coconut (first photo) is the senior man you can see meowing very loudly for his Friskies Party Mix! Coconut gets along very well with others and LOVES to snuggle! He recently made two new kitty friends, Solice and Tumbler, but would LOVE his very own forever home! Please check him out on Petfinder (https://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/33630094) if you are interested in taking home this wonderful guy!

Raziel (second photo) is a very sweet boy who wants nothing more than to be outside playing with his person. Although Raziel was transferred from LHS to a rescue in Sheboygan, he made sure to get his share of the Beggin’ Strips before heading out! And, just days after arriving there, he was placed into a lovely forever home.

Carmel (third photo) is a charming senior man who is just a hoot to watch! He liked to stand on his hind legs and beg for attention by clapping his paws together. He, of course, got lots of petting in addition to Friskies Party Mix for his efforts! Carmel was adopted two months ago from our Petco location and then a month later his family came in and adopted a friend for him.

Cats Angels, Inc. SPCA: Purina and Amazon Treats for the Holidays
What was the money or product used for?

For all of our cats and kittens waiting for adoption

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

All of our kitties LOVE the Friskies Party Mix cat treats! When visitors come to visit the cats in our adoption center, we give them a shaker bottle of the Party Mix to give the kitties as a treat; the visitors love doing this and it is a great interaction tool for the cats.

How many pets did this grant help?

We have over 60 cats in our adoption center.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We have one special pastel calico whose name is Stephanie; she had to take medicine for almost two weeks. Well, she is rather difficult to pill. Since Stephanie ADORES Friskies Party Mix (we think she would eat this alone) one of our volunteers holds the treats way up high for her to get and when she opens her mouth we pop the pill down her throat! Nobody gets hurt and she is happy to get her treat and we get her pill in her:) Meet Stephanie: https://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/34777587

Hardin Animal Relocation and Transition Team (HARTT): KONG Toy Grant
What was the money or product used for?

We received a grant of Kong toys on Jan. 11, 2016, for use with our foster dogs and puppies in our rescue. Since receiving the Kong toys, we have used them with over 300 animals who have passed through our rescue. When we received the physical toys, we shared a photo of them with our Facebook fans (over 45,000 likes) and let everyone know how excited we were that the babies would have great toys to play with for the New Year.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We were so excited to receive toys that could be washed and sanitized daily for our puppies to play with and chew on. As a rescue that deals mostly with litters of puppies that we bring into foster homes, vet, and then transfer to northern rescues who find them homes, we have many litters in puppy playpens and exercise pens who are really in quarantine from outside play or being with other animals. Since they don’t get out of their pens except during cleaning periods each day, the time that they can play and entertain themselves is important. Of course, the toys get dirty and need to be cleaned. With Kongs, we can clean them and disinfect them easily with soap, water and bleach. We can also sanitize between litters to keep infection or disease from transferring between litters like we do with the puppy pens, water and food bowls. The puppies and big dogs loved having treats inside the Kongs as well. They have a great time following them around as they wobble across the pen. Once a puppy comes out of quarantine, they can play with their toys nicely on a hardwood floor while waiting for their adopter to come pick them up. 😉

How many pets did this grant help?

These toys have entertained and enriched about 300 dogs and puppies in just the last three months, and they will continue to help animals throughout the year.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We get litters of puppies who are scared and fearful due to having been dumped in the woods, or who are not being used to human touch for whatever reason. These puppies are usually so used to just survival that they have no idea how to play. Usually, the Kongs will sit ignored in their pens for a few days, but then in a day or two, one of them finds that it can be chewed on. Then another will play keep-away from a sibling and it becomes a fun thing that they enjoy playing with together. Then we find that they take it into their sleeping areas as a prize to keep safe. They look forward to getting their clean areas with their new Kong toys several times a day at that point. It is a pleasure to see them come out of their shells and just relax and play!

Valley Humane Society: Purina and Amazon Treats for the Holidays
What was the money or product used for?

Treats were distributed to animals in the facility and foster care.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Cats are housed in a communal living environment at the VHS facility. Each cat has its own kennel or room (unless it’s part of bonded pair) but they are exposed to the other cats throughout the day. This environment, while appealing to visitors, is stressful for the cats. Treats are used as motivators to get cats in and out of their kennels and in and out of the outdoor cat run. We can also use treats to coax cats out to meet visitors and keep everyone safe and avoid scruffing the cats. Treats were also sent home with several 3-month-old kittens who needed socialization to become adoptable companion animals.

How many pets did this grant help?

39

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

VHS recently adopted out a cat who originally arrived on March 26, 2013. She was adopted on Feb. 25, 2014, but returned on Nov. 18, 2014. Zuzu was unhappy with other cats, and the shelter environment was very stressful. Luckily, treats were a great motivator for Zuzu to safely move her in and out of her kennel. She was adopted to a new family on Feb. 12, 2016, and is now extremely content and happy in her own forever home.

Save A Life Pet Rescue: Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The Orvis Animal Care Grant was used for spaying/neutering, vaccinating, deworming, and providing any necessary medical treatment to rescue dogs and puppies before adoption.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The Orvis Animal Care Grant helped Save A Life Pet Rescue continue its mission by helping abandoned and neglected animals, regardless of age, breed, or medical condition, in the Central Florida area successfully find forever homes. This grant helped dogs and puppies get spayed/neutered, vaccinated, and dewormed, and receive any additional medical attention before they were adopted. The rescue was able to extend its reach and help animals that required lifesaving veterinary care and treatment, giving them the best chance to find a loving home. Without the Orvis Animal Care Grant, many of these dogs would not have been able to get adopted and live the fulfilling lives that they deserve.

How many pets did this grant help?

11

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Honey (first photo) is a 4-year-old miniature poodle who came to our rescue with very matted fur and tested positive for heartworms. We were able to get her spayed, vaccinated, dewormed, and groomed. The Orvis Animal Care Grant allowed Save A Life Pet Rescue to treat her heartworm disease, without which she would not have been able to find the loving, forever home that she did. She was adopted by a doting family where she will always be cherished.

Boo Radley (second and third photos), a young Great Dane, was severely neglected before she came to our rescue along with her sister. Unfortunately, her sister passed away from complications of living in such deplorable conditions for so long. Boo Radley was very scared and shy when she first came to us. She was emaciated, had lost most of her fur due to mange, and her paws were so badly infected she could barely walk without limping. The Orvis Animal Care Grant made it possible to save Boo Radley’s life and find her the happy home she deserved. After intense treatment, she gained weight, grew a shiny new coat, and was almost unrecognizable from her initial days with the rescue. She is a bright, happy, loveable girl who got a second chance at life with a wonderful new family that absolutely adores her!

Honey (fourth photo) is a Husky mix who was brought to Save A Life Pet Rescue with her eight newborn puppies from a shelter in Georgia. She was an amazing mother to her pups, very sweet and affectionate, nursing and weaning them for a few months in one of our foster homes. With the Orvis Animal Care Grant, we were able to get Honey spayed, vaccinated, and dewormed. Happily, Honey was adopted, together with one of her puppies (fifth photo), by a loving family!

Lancaster SPCA: Disaster Grant
What was the money or product used for?

All of the grant money received was used directly for dogs received from South Carolina shelters due to a disaster. All of the dogs had heartworm, for which they were treated and were fully vetted. This grant provided the necessary funds to enable us to treat all of the dogs fully.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

All pets found loving homes and were completely vetted and heartworm was taken care of.

How many pets did this grant help?

12

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

A hound dog who had puppies was heartworm-positive. She and all her puppies found great homes once the puppies were weaned and brought back from foster care to the Lancaster County SPCA.

Valley Humane Society: Purina and Amazon Treats for the Holidays
What was the money or product used for?

The dog treats were used for our dogs residing at our facility and also dogs in foster homes. In February and March, we brought in 49 dogs. Treats are used to coax dogs on walks, reward them for basic training achievements and increase their socialization in a family environment.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The dogs residing at our facility are walked five times per day. Treats are good motivators to take them on walks and get them in and out of their individual kennels.

How many pets did this grant help?

49

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

On March 16, 2016, VHS brought in a 2-year-old male Dalmatian from Stockton Animal Services. The dog, called Darby, had been found as a stray in the Stockton area, not neutered and very unsure of his surroundings. Once under our care, he was neutered and treated for giardia and an upper respiratory infection. He was put on several medications, including pain relief after the neuter surgery, and obviously was uncomfortable and not feeling well. He was hesitant to go on walks and nervous when loud trucks or motorcycles passed by. Treats were a key motivator to get Darby out in the sun to stretch his legs and get some exercise. Volunteers kept treats in their pockets to keep him moving as he often stopped in the middle of the sidewalk and wouldn’t budge for long stretches of time.

On March 25, Darby was adopted to a local family with another male Dalmatian and they are committed to working on his behavior and helping him gain confidence that he is loved in his new forever home.

West Feliciana Animal Humane Society: Purina and Amazon Treats for the Holidays
What was the money or product used for?

Treats for our cats. Good, nutritious treats are given to our cats daily.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The cats look forward to something different and tasty. This helps with potential adopters who love to interact with the cats.

How many pets did this grant help?

45 to 50 each day

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We have a couple of adult cats who are shy — Jangles (first photo) and Aurora. They were overlooked so many times by potential adopters. Instead of coming to meet people, they would stay on their perches looking down on everyone. But when they heard the treat can being shaken, down they would come. So funny to see them purr and walk among everyone’s legs. Both have since been adopted.

Humane Society Silicon Valley: Build-A-Bear Youth Humane Education Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The Petfinder Foundation grant was used to pay for all of the supplies associated with facilitating two programs for identified high-risk children. These programs served a total of 95 children. That included transportation from the school site to HSSV and back, program shirts, supplies such as treat bags, folders, three-panel boards, teacher packets, event supplies for the culmination of the program, development of film and training materials.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We offered two programs to teachers who serve at-risk children and teens. These children visited HSSV for intensive, animal-focused workshops, and the students were trained to provide socialization and to care for the daily needs of the shelter animals. At the conclusion of the program, 30 elementary school “buddies” visited HSSV to learn from the teens through a student-designed exhibition that was attended by multiple teachers and the students’ families. This is a critical component of the program – kids teaching kids.

This program challenged the students to be leaders and to set (and achieve) their own goals, and motivated them to evaluate and adjust their behaviors now that they had their little buddies depending upon and looking up to them. As the older students proudly took on the roles of leaders and trusted experts, they felt empowered. The program also taught teens how to recognize, understand and correct negative animal behavior with compassion and without using force. And as students learned the importance of respecting animals’ feelings and let their compassion shine, they started to see kindness as a strength, not a weakness.

The student’s school teacher, Sara Piazzola, said the program “helped them internalize the messages that they send out to people. It also helped them step out of the realm of ‘my own needs’ and into a realm where they needed to think about what someone else was ‘saying’ and how they needed to respond.”

The teens in this program cleaned the cages of some of our most high-risk animals: sick feral cats and kittens housed in our Kitten Nursery. They learned about the critical importance of disease control by gowning up and ensuring that whenever one hand touched soiled materials, they changed gloves! They learned to swaddle the animals and help them feel safe while their peers swept out, cleaned and carefully restocked each kennel.

Please see this video, which was shared with their little buddies on the last day of the program, and during their school graduation ceremony: https://youtu.be/C-Z8IBGVvwM

How many pets did this grant help?

Each of the participants socialized a total of five animals while they were involved in the program. More than 100 pets benefited from the care and attention the children provided.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

The students in the program significantly supported a critical area at our shelter: the kitten nursery. They soothed shy and fearful cats. They learned all about the importance of disease control and helped each other ensure that the rooms stayed as sterile as possible. They also worked directly with many of the dogs. One in particular, Buttercup, an older basset hound (first photo), barked a lot while she was in her kennel. Her deep and heavy bark caught a lot of people off guard. The students were asked to work with her using positive-reinforcement techniques. While she didn’t stop barking altogether, she was significantly less vocal with people entering her kennel! She has since been adopted.

Richmond Animal Shelter: Petfinder Adoption Options in Action Grant (Invitation Only)
What was the money or product used for?

The money was used to help purchase Accel Cleaner, a costly disinfectant cleaner (and deodorizer) that we use in the shelter. It is:
•Effective against a broad spectrum of bacteria, viruses and fungi, including Parvo, staph, HIV and more
•Non-toxic and non-irritating, high safety profile
•Accel Concentrate sanitizes surfaces in 3 minutes and disinfects in 5 minutes
•Accel TB is ready to use and sanitizes surfaces in 30 seconds and disinfects in 5 minutes

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We recently had an outbreak of the upper respiratory infection in the shelter. Over 80% of our cat population was infected and the shelter was forced to be closed while we got the outbreak under control. Having a supply of Accel cleaner available to us allowed us to properly disinfect every cat cage and room. At the same time, we set up an isolation ward in a separate building; Accel was used to prepare the ward and ensure the URI was properly sterilized before the sick cats moved in. We also revised our cleaning protocols, and adapted them to specifically include the use of Accel cleaner.

How many pets did this grant help?

At the time we received the grant, about 50 cats were directly positively impacted by the purchase of the Accel cleaner. We continue to use the cleaner and now our entire shelter population of cats and dogs (~80) has benefited from the grant.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

The ‘S’ litter — Silvie (mama), her friend Suki, and Silvie’s six kittens (Scout, Scrappy, Scooter, Sassafras, Skitter and Scamper) — were brought to us by a good Samaritan who intercepted the family from being attacked by raccoons. Every cat in the group had fleas and all suffered from an upper respiratory infection, but were all friendly and receptive to being handled. The kittens varied in weight from 300g to 750g, so their weights were monitored daily and extra bottle feedings were given. These cats were the sickest cats to enter the shelter in a long time, so extra precautions were taken to ensure their URI didn’t spread to the shelter environment. Because of the Petfinder Foundation grant, we were able to purchase and establish new cleaning protocols using Accel cleaner to not only help disinfect the cages that housed the S litter, but to also prevent the spread of their URI.

We are happy to report that all members of the ‘S’ litter have been adopted and are thriving in their new homes.