Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

Animal Charity of Ohio: Stretch and Scratch Cat Scratchers
What was the money or product used for?

The Stretch and Scratch grant was used to stimulate the cats that are currently in our shelter waiting to be adopted as well as begin the learning process as to where is and is not appropriate to scratch. Therefore, when going into new homes we would have less returns for cats that are scratching furniture or other undesirable areas.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The Stretch and Scratch cat scratchers were placed on the inside of each individual cat’s cage. They were beneficial in aiding proper scratching behavior. When sending a cat home with their new family, we sent them home with their scratch pad to continue teaching them where is appropriate to scratch. Also, to help keep the current cats housed in our facility stimulated and happy. Another way this has been beneficial to our organization is the door in the cat room has a wooden frame and the cats loved to scratch it! We placed a Stretch and Scratch pad on the door and it has deterred the cats from damaging the door frame and they are now happily scratching in a location that is acceptable.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant has helped all of the cats that have been housed in our care. Up-to-date, the Stretch and Scratch cats scratchers have helped 17 cats!

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

One of our older residents came in very afraid and not very social. His name is Biggie and he was seized from a home where he was not cared for properly. It has taken some time to get Biggie to come around and begin socializing with our staff and potential adopters. In the beginning, Biggie didn’t even want to come out of his cage. Even with the door open, he would keep to himself. The Stretch and Scratch cat scratcher has helped him relieve stress in an environment that’s hard to get adjusted to. He now comes out every morning and is happy to see new people. Biggie has become much more adoptable and should be finding a new home soon. Learn more about adopting him here: http://bit.ly/AdoptBiggie

Raton Animal Shelter: Stretch and Scratch Cat Scratchers
What was the money or product used for?

Scratchers were hung in each of the cat cages at the shelter.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The cats now have a scratching pad to use, which gives them at least some activity rather than sitting in a cage all day. It has helped with boredom.

How many pets did this grant help?

To date, I would say at least 24 cats.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

An individual surrendered Giorgio, their household cat, to the shelter due to lack of funds to care for him. While at the shelter, Giorgio would cower in its corner just totally lost.Once the scratchers were placed on his cage, he started coming out to partake in scratching. More and more he came back to his own personality, and now he has been adopted. This scratcher actually saved this cat by giving him activity and moving around.

Lida sez Olbia: Shelter+ Challenge
What was the money or product used for?

It was used to rebuild our compound’s roof covers.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

In November 2013, our region was badly hit by flooding and a hurricane. The damages to our shelter were considerable. The roof covers of the compounds were damaged very seriously and, as we speak, many of the dogs’ fenced areas are now completely exposed to the elements, day and night, causing inevitable distress to our beloved animals.

For this reason, what matters to us most, even from a financial point of view, is the rebuilding of the roof covers to the fenced areas. This is an extremely expensive exercise. But it is paramount to provide adequate shelter to all our “guests,” both in winter and in summer.

How many pets did this grant help?

The shelter is caring for about 700 dogs and 150 cats.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Photo 1: Eins lives in compound n.39. He will finally have a new roof over his head.

Photo 2: Ine of the enclosures just after the hurricane hit… it looks more like a swimming pool!

Photo 3: Labbry, rescued during the floods, will be able to keep nice and dry!

Photo 4: Once Rossino has recovered, he will be able to enjoy a warm and dry place at the shelter, very different from the life he had as a newborn kitten in the streets.

Chance at Life Cat Rescue: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

Two large bags of Cat Chow.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We were able to purchase extra food.

How many pets did this grant help?

25

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Almost all of our cats/kittens are rescues from the street along with some owner surrenders and kill shelter rescues. The grant money was used to buy extra food for the cats we care for like Alina, Cameo, Felicity and Galdby.

Humane Society of Midland County : Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

General operations.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

$180 will cover the cost of spay/neuter surgery for four cats.

How many pets did this grant help?

Four.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Fonzie is an adorable and oh-so-sweet little baby boy. He and his siblings are waiting patiently for their forever homes but surely won’t last long! Fonzie can be met and paid for and then will be able to go home on Friday, Jan. 25, after his neuter surgery. His adoption fee is $60 and includes his neuter, vaccines, FIV/FeLV test and microchip.

Furry Orphans Waiting Adoption (FOWA): Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

The money was used towards veterinary costs, spay/neuter costs and supplies for the animals in our care.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped FOWA and the pets in our care by allowing us to continue our mission and by helping the animals that come into our care until we can find them a furever home of their own.

How many pets did this grant help?

We currently have almost 70 cats/kittens and 17 puppies/dogs — and this grant helped all of them a little bit.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We received an email telling us these kittens’ momma was poisoned and died..and these little kittens were surely headed for a life outside in Paterson, N.J. Well not so! This shot was snapped yesterday at our vet! We were able to convince the young woman whose cat it was to turn them over to us. They are receiving the best care possible and this grant allows us to continue to do so.

Stafford SPCA: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

Our first sponsorship disbursement was $45 for a three-month period, and it has been deposited into our general operating account used to pay for shelter supplies such as clumping litter, cat/dog food and cleaning supplies.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Every little bit helps. Our first disbursement showed us that people WILL give using this method, and we are currently working on marketing materials to spread the word to others who, although they may not be able to adopt or foster, can still help our pets through sponsorship.

How many pets did this grant help?

All of them.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Big Leo came to us in December 2013 when we received a call from the local Wounded Warrior Program. Leo’s family had been affected by deployments and later by traumatic brain injury. When an extended family member was brought in to care for his people, the extended family member dumped Leo on the side of the road in another county to avoid caring for him.

We brought Leo into our facility and have housed him since. He was deficient in vet care, hadn’t been neutered and had tummy issues due to poor quality food. In our care, everything has been brought up to date, he’s been “fixed” and is getting the attention and exercise he needs, allowing him to be a calm, well adjusted boy!

UPDATE: May 8, 2014: Big Leo went to his forever home. He now has a big fenced yard, four children, a trampoline, lots of tree branches to chew on — it’s a rough life. I will miss him terribly, but we did right by Leo, and he is in a wonderful home with lots of children to play with and watch over. Godspeed, Big Leo.

Upper Peninsula Animal Welfare Shelter: Shelter+ Challenge
What was the money or product used for?

$1,000 was used for our general expense account. UPAWS is an open admission no-kill shelter in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. UPAWS is not controlled by outside sources, nor does it receive funding from outside sources. Marquette County does not provide financial support to UPAWS. UPAWS does not hold any political agenda with national organizations such as PETA or the Humane Society of the United States, nor do it receive monetary donations from them. So grants such as these are vital to the ongoing running of our open-admission shelter. We are very grateful to our wonderful community and Petfinder Foundation for awarding UPAWS this grant.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Food, operation of the building, vet care (this is a huge one!), adoption programs (we frequently run discount programs), staffing, education, community outreach, spay neuter programs for the community — these are just a few of the many things UPAWS uses donations and grants for — and all help our pets find loving homes.

How many pets did this grant help?

In 2013 we found homes for 1630 pets.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Carmel s one of many. She has a open sore that our vets have been treating for months — grants such as the Petfinder Foundation $1,000 goes toward much-needed vet care for pets such as Carmel. Here is her bio: Carmel is a pretty 5-year-old female spayed orange tabby. She was surrendered because her owner couldn’t afford her pets. She is affectionate, friendly and cuddly. She is litter box trained and nice and neat. Little Carmel has am allergy that has causes a sore boo-boo on her side but this hasn’t stopped Carmel from being the sweetest kitty at the shelter! She does wear a cone now while she has her vet prescribed meds, so she doesn’t lick her side. This darling girl is wonderful and she loves her people friends. Carmel takes her medicine like an angel, loves to be touched and enjoys the company of all those that say hello to her. This is a wonderful girl who longs for a kind soul to take the time and really meet her — you’ll see what a sweetheart she is.

LEARN more about adopting Carmel here –> http://bit.ly/MeetCarmel

Wood County Humane Society: A Shot at Life Vaccination Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Vaccinating our cats.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The A Shot at Life grant we were awarded helped our organization prepare cats and kittens for adoption, as well as help protect them against disease. At the direction of our veterinarian, we combined the FVRCP (gave as a first dose) with the Fel-O-Vax Lv-K IV + Calicivax (gave as the booster). This allowed us to use the FVRCP vaccines on 99 cats and kittens. The grant did free up some our funds, and this ultimately allowed us to help a few more animals this year (2013), than we did last year (2012).

How many pets did this grant help?

99 cats/kittens (one vaccine was broken on arrival).

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Here are stories from adopters who took home cats who were helped by this grant.

Cashmere (picture one), adopted Dec. 4, 2013: “At first, Cashmere was small and very shy. When we brought her home, she was scared and hid in the smallest spaces. However, after only a few days, her curiosity got the best of her and she began playing with toys, especially her mouse toy. She loves attention and sleeps next to us when we are sitting on the couch. She also loves looking out the window. She is timid around strangers, but once she gets to know you, she is very friendly. She does the cutest things, and we love her to death.” — Ilario and Brittney

Valencia (picture two), adopted Sept. 13, 2013: “Meet Valencia. A good Samaritan brought her to the Wood County Humane Society in August 2013 after they found her on the side of a country road tied up in a plastic bag. She was approximately six weeks old and suffered head trauma and had an upper respiratory infection. The Shelter provided her with the supportive care she needed until she was old enough and well enough to be adopted out. In late August I came to the Shelter looking for a cat to join the two we already had. We have more than enough room in our home to love another animal! I was looking for a female kitten. After hearing her story and how she was found, my heart melted. I knew she was the one I wanted to give a forever home to. We brought her home in mid-September and named her Phoebe. As you can see from the photos, she quickly snuggled around her blanket, lays on the couch with her brothers wrapped up around each other, and one where her and our oldest cat Peep (who is 14) are always joined at the hip. As you can see from the photos, she is well adjusted to her new home and two brothers. I love her 🙂 or should say that Mike and I love her. She has brought so much joy to our home and to our other cats and we are very thankful for her.” — Sue

Marvel and Woody (picture three), adopted Nov. 1, 2013: “Marvel and Chip (FKA Woody) are doing well! Chip (Woody) settled in immediately and Marvel took a bit longer than we expected. He had some litter box issues that were concerning and his personality seemed to change to an introvert but he did eventually make a turn around and he is back to his super friendly self. Marvel still follows us around while he purrs and squishes his paws. He loves to be petted but isn’t much of a lap sitter. Chip is quite a character and is up to all kinds of kitten shenanigans. Both of them have learned to get along with our 2 dogs and our other cat just fine too. We are very happy that we came to the Humane Society and are glad we adopted both of them! I have attached a few pictures for you.” — The Rollo family

Harrison (picture four), adopted Sept. 2, 2013: “Back in September of 2013, we decided to get a cat. I went to the Wood County Humane Society website and found this cute little kitten called Harrison. My boyfriend and I went to the shelter to see how compatible Harrison would be with our family. He was shy and very curious but I had a feeling he would be a great playmate for our dog. When we brought him home, he was hesitant to go near the dog but soon realized that the dog didn’t like being smacked on the nose by a kitten paw. The dog was terrified of Harrison but once he got comfortable with the tiny ball of fur attacking his tail, he started playing with him instead of running away. We also noticed that Harrison was not really responding to his name so we changed it to Jack. He is a wonderful addition to our family and a great playmate for our dog. I’m glad we went to the Humane Society!” — Amanda Parker of Toledo, Ohio

Twitchy and Willy (photos five and six), adopted Nov. 29, 2013: “I got a call today requesting an update on Twitchy (who is now Rory, short for Rorschach Borealis Mittens) and Willy (who is now JJ, short for Jacka*s Junior, aka Julius ‘JJ’ Sneezer). We adopted Rory and JJ on Nov. 29, the day after Thanksgiving, so today is their 5-week anniversary at our house. We also have two older cats, so we were initially apprehensive about how the integration would go. It’s gone quite well. The kittens now own the place. We are so glad that we adopted them. They are best buddies and play with one another all the time, although they have very different personalities. Rory (the marbled kitten) is a sidekick and follows us everywhere and likes to sleep on our recliner chairs. JJ (grey kitten) is a lap kitty and wants to sit as far up on our chests as he can go and just purrs all the time. He also likes to sleep on the heater vents.” — Danielle and Todd Kuhl

Jethro (photo seven), adopted Nov. 3, 2013: “Jethro is the third rescue cat living in our household at this time and the only male. His sisters are Daisy, 4, and Lucy, 3. Jethro was a birthday present for my 9-year-old daughter Julianne. She loves cats and wanted a kitten that would be ‘hers.’ Our older cats don’t like to be picked up and are a little more shy than Jethro. Jethro gets gets to sleep every night in Julianne’s room, where he has his own litter box and toys. He gets along better with Daisy, who is a little more tolerant of his kitten energy. Lucy is starting to warm up to him a little bit, but she will still smack him out of her way if she is not in the mood to play. We are in the process of trying to teach Jethro manners, i.e. staying out of people food and staying off of the kitchen table. He is a very cuddly and loving kitty. He loves to play and climb on his cat tree. He is a well loved member of the family!”

The Gabriel Foundation: Disaster Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The money provided to The Gabriel Foundation by this grant was used to purchase additional ultra-high efficiency HEPA air purifiers/filters to provide extreme filtration to lessen airborne particulates that were a life threatening danger to companion parrots and related birds at The Gabriel Foundation’s aviary and adoption center during the Black Forest wildfires in Colorado in June 2013, that whose epicenter was about 30 miles from our location.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant provided lifesaving whole room air circulation and ultra-fine particulates filtration to remove airborne toxins/particulates that were a life threatening danger to our flock of nearly 900 birds. Due to the severity of the heat and fire generated winds, no fresh air could be provided to our birds while the fires raged. The five aviary and adoption center buildings are not fully air conditioned, and all fresh air vents were sealed due to the smoke danger while we determined whether or not evacuation would be necessary. Due to the ultra-efficient respiratory systems of parrots and related birds, they are highly susceptible to airborne toxins or pollutants, and death is often the outcome. These additional air purifiers provided complete air exchange and filtration to cleanse the air of particulates. Removing these life-threatening toxins from the air was critical to our flock’s lives. We added four more air filters to the dozen that were already working overtime. Without the filters made possible through this grant, it is highly probable that many birds would have lost their lives.

How many pets did this grant help?

856 parrots and other companion birds

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Some Macaw species are highly susceptible to a form of avian asthma, much like Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) in humans. When diagnosed with this condition, birds must be carefully monitored and kept safe from all airborne contaminants. Chipper, Arthur, Kona, Monet, Tillie, Zoe, Disney and Merlin are each Macaws that have COPD. In 2009, Disney and his owner were evacuated from the extreme wildfires near Boulder, Colo. During that time, the bird’s owner lost all of his belongings, his home and quickly evacuated his birds and dogs. He brought the birds to TGF for their safety and health. During the next year, Disney met and fell for Merlin, a Scarlet Macaw, and the two birds soon became fast friends. When it was time for Disney’s owner to be relocated to another home, Disney went home with him and so did Merlin, who was adopted by Disney’s owner. Fast forward a couple of years, and the owner and birds were again caught in a wildfire, this time outside of Boulder, Colorado. During the fire, the birds and owner were evacuated and the birds again came to us for care. Their owner sustained severe lung damage from smoke inhalation when he rescued his birds and dogs from his property. He was hospitalized for several months and ultimately doctors determined that his lungs were too fragile to ever live with a companion parrot again, and both birds were relinquished to TGF. This summer devastating wildfires broke out about 30 miles from our aviary and adoption center from the Black Forest wildfire. Disney, Merlin and the other birds were kept safe as a result of the safety net provided by the additional air filters. It was a frightening five days with near lock down at our aviary and adoption center as more birds were evacuated by owners or law enforcement personnel and brought to TGF for safety. The air purifiers purchased with this grant from Petfinder Foundation became an essential part of our birds’ survival.