Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

Basenji Rescue & Transport: Shelter Challenge
What was the money or product used for?

Milo, a 12-year-old rescue, required multiple (3) vet visits including one tumor removal.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The $1,000 covered most but not all of Milos immediate vet expenses.

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

The $1,000.00 grant bestowed upon BRAT has been put to good use in the care of Milo, a senior Basenji who was in need of extensive medical treatment after having none for the prior 30 months.

Milo, a 12-year-old male Basenji, came into BRAT when his owner relocated to a residence where only one dog was allowed. Milo was the second dog in the household at the time. Milo’s first visit to the vet was for heartworm testing, updates of immunizations and a senior wellness panel. He was showing signs of arthritis, crankiness, urination inside the home and had an unknown growth on his leg.

After examining Milo, BRAT was told that he had a couple of slipped discs which were creating some arthritis and swelling which were irritating his bladder. He was given a non-steroid anti-inflammatory and another medication for incontinence. BRAT was also told he had a low heart rate and the growth was diagnosed as a grade 2 mast cell tumor.

Following negative results on the heartworm test the tumor was removed. Finally a third visit was necessary to update the balance of immunizations once the tumor was resolved and the low heart rate did not reappear on subsequent visits.

To date vet expenses for Milo have totaled $1,224.50. The last vet visit was December 10, 2013 and we are happy to advise that Milo, despite his advanced age and health issues, has found a new home.

Castaway Animal Rescue Effort: Shelter+ Challenge
What was the money or product used for?

We spent about half of the money recieved on medical and vet bills for our animals to get them ready for adoption. The rest was used to purchase bleach, cleaner, dry dog and cat food, trash bags, cat litter, laundry detergent and grooming supplies for both of our adoption centers.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped us tremendously. We were able to stock up on much-needed supplies, as well as pay off a good portion of our vet bill. This grant has helped us enter the new year with a fresh start and peace of mind. We will have supplies on hand, even if donations are slow.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant helped purchase supplies for about 100 animals (including animals in both of our adoption centers) and helped pay off veterinary bills.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Dolly is an 8-year-old Dachshund mix. She has a chronic condition called Cushing's disease. Dolly is a very sweet girl, but she requires medication twice daily for her disease. She is also on special prescription food. This grant enabled us to buy some of her food in bulk, while also refilling her medications. We can now take care of Dolly as long as she needs us to, and send some supplies home with her when she is adopted!

Ark-Valley Humane Society, Inc.: A Shot at Life Vaccination Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The product of feline vaccinations was used to vaccinate cats upon intake at our two animal shelters, in Buena Vista and in Poncha Springs, Colorado.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Keeping shelter cats healthy is an essential task that helps these animals find homes. Providing cats vaccinations upon intake is a best practice that assures that we are taking every precaution to prevent an outbreak of contagious illnesses. Vaccinated cats are less likely to get sick have a shorter length of stay. This means that healthy and vaccinated cats find homes sooner and save costs in terms of medical bills and staff time for our shelter.

How many pets did this grant help?

25

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Casey was a kitten who arrived at Ark-Valley Humane Society in August 2013 after his owner died. He was vaccinated thanks to the Petfinder Foundation's A Shot At Life grant. Casey was adopted in September to a loving home. We'd like to share with you the note his adopter sent us: "We are thrilled to have found Casey after a long search for the perfect kitty. We were also extremely impressed with the Ark-Valley operation in Poncha Springs, the friendliness of the staff and the exceptional cleanliness of the facility. We have looked in many places and Ark-Valley Humane Society is the best!

"Casey was 7 months old when we adopted him last month. For the first 24 hours, he did not stop purring! He explored every nook and cranny in the house and especially loves the high places. Surprisingly, he loves playing in water so his middle name is now Rango (after the movie about searching for water.) It's only been a month and he has brought so much laughter and joy to our home and our hearts. We love him!"

Canine Estates, Inc.: Shelter Challenge
What was the money or product used for?

Medical care

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

For two dogs in need of medical care.

How many pets did this grant help?

Two

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Cooper: A dog found in the woods with identical cuts to each eye. Reese: Pulled from Polk County Animal Control, an owner turn-in in terrible condition.

Canine Estates, Inc.: Shelter+ Challenge
What was the money or product used for?

Medical care.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We pull dogs from mostly [open-admission] animal shelters. We rehabilitate them, have them vaccinated, spayed or neutered. We do not discriminate due to age or health issues.

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Freedom. Pulled from Polk County Animal Control on July 3, 2013. Animal cruelty case. Freedom was left to starve to death. She weighed 6.1 lbs, she was 8 years old, had hookworms, hair loss, severe dry eye, severe cornea ulcers in both eyes (she is unable to see), no muscle mass at all. She was literally skin over top of a skeleton and she had a glucose reading of 583. She is diabetic. She spent 10 days in intensive care with blood transfusions.

Humane Society for Hamilton County: Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The grant funding was used to support our Homeward Bound for the Holidays campaign. During the month of December, we chose the top 10 dogs and top 10 cats (based on their length of stay at the shelter) to be the “Featured 20” for the campaign. Your generous donation was used to help support the dog portion of the program. We used the funds to spay/neuter the dogs that were not already altered and the remaining funds were used to feed and shelter the dogs until they found their homes. A small portion of the funds was also used towards printing flyers to promote the adoption campaign.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Every animal is required to be spayed/neutered before it leaves our facility. By altering the featured dogs, every dog was able to go home the day of their adoption; instead of waiting a day or two to be altered at one of our participating vets. This way pets got go home right away and enjoy their new families just in time for the holidays. When animals are already altered, they are more appealing to potential adopters. There is no doubt this contributed to our 70% successes rate of dogs being adopted through our Homeward Bound for the Holidays campaign.

How many pets did this grant help?

10

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Princess Penelope came to our shelter as a pregnant stray. She gave birth to her litter of puppies in a foster home. She was a wonderful mother to them all. When they were old enough, her puppies were available for adoption. And like most puppies, they all found homes right away. However, Princess Penelope didn’t. In fact, she waited over a year before her family found her. Everyone wants puppies, but who wants a 3 year old Pit Bull mix that has had puppies? We knew there would be someone; it would just take a much longer time to find the perfect fit. And thanks to your donation and support of our Homeward Bound for the Holidays campaign, Princess Penelope was adopted by a wonderful family on December 21, 2013 – just in time for Christmas.

Popcorn Park/AHS-Forked River: Shelter Challenge
What was the money or product used for?

The money was used towards our Res-Q-Fund to help injured animals with surgeries, medications etc.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This money helped our organization to pay for the medical needs of Trinity.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

An East Orange backyard breeder brought in a 4-month-old Rottweiler from the litter he had raised. All had been sold, but Trinity had been born with a congenital handicap. There was no question as to why he was turning her in -- obviously this pup would not bring in any money on the puppy market since she had a deformity. Little Trinity has a severely deformed front paw. Her other front leg is also deformed, and is just a tiny stub. Trinity was immediately taken to our medical department for evaluation and x-rays, and was then sent down to us at Popcorn Park for round-the-clock care.

We immediately fell in love with the playful and lovable little girl. Trinity has such a warm and loving personality, and is such a fun-loving little girl that you wouldn't know there was anything wrong with her. We found out quickly that even with a deformity, she doesn't let anything slow her down. She is a huge fan of squeaky toys and will take off after any that you throw for her. She also loves other animals and is always up for playing with one. She is our new office mascot by day, and at night, she goes home with our kennel supervisor -- who spoils her silly.

A consultation was done with Dr. Russell Howe-Smith, surgeon and owner of Pet PT in Cherry Hill, who has done some amazing work on several of our other handicapped and injured animals in the past. He has taken dogs and cats who would have been left paralyzed due to various conditions, including abuse, and took the time to work with them and get them up on all fours again. Trinity took a trip to Pet PT and as Dr. Howe-Smith was finishing up with a patient and walking by, Trinity took one look at him and began following him around! It was as if she knew this was the person that could help her.

After a thorough evaluation by Dr. Howe-Smith, we are just thrilled to report that Trinity will have a long and healthy life ahead of her. She needs a procedure called a podoplasty, where her front paw will have the two appendages fused together to form one healthy, usable paw. Her other deformed leg is not causing her any pain, so she will just be without the use of that one. After the operation, Trinity will require bracing for about eight weeks and then she will be ready to start life over again in a wonderful new home!

If Trinity had been brought to any other place, who knows what would have become of her? Lucky for her, she came to us and we will do everything in our power to ensure that she gets every chance possible to live a long, full life as a happy and healthy dog.

Doberman and Rottweiler, Inc.: A Shot at Life Vaccination Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Vaccinating felines in our shelter.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

I am sending an update to our earlier update. As of Dec. 8, we have been able to take in an additional three pregnant cats who were too far along to spay -- they were trapped in a neighborhood and we took them in. Together they had 14 kittens. We put them into foster homes and they are now old enough to spay/neuter and put up for adoption. All felines were vaccinated with two FVRCP vaccines.

Today I have committed to a litter of six kittens who were found thrown in a ditch. Without the help of this grant, we would have been unable to take in the numbers of felines we have. This grant was a blessing to our organization and we are very appreciative of your generosity.

P.S. So far in 2014 we have already taken in 18 felines, of whom three are too far along to spay so we will put them into foster home and raise the kittens. Thank you again for this wonderful opportunity that we greatly appreciate. All vaccines at this time have been used for shelter cats.

I would like to update you on the grant we received through the Petfinder Foundation. We received 150 FVRCP vaccines in July. We use a local vet who gives us good discounts on rescue-animal vetting. With this donation we saved $900 on vaccines. We feel that with this amount of savings to our organization we will be able to take in 40 more cats and have them totally vetted and put up for adoption. We take 98% of our felines from [open-admission] animal-control facilities at this time.

We were able to take in 14 extra kittens this week from an animal control facility that asked for our help. All our cats are FELV/FIV tested, RV if old enough, FVRCP, dewormed, flea product applied, ear mite treatment and spayed/neutered prior to adoption.

This grant will allow us to save the lives of 40 cats that we would not have been able to take otherwise due to budget restraints. We are extremely grateful that you felt our organization was worthy of this grant.

How many pets did this grant help?

80 more than we would have been able to take in for adoption. More than anything, the money we saved on vaccines allowed us to take in more felines than our budget was going to allow. So with this grant and the matching grant from a vet, we saved more felines than would have been possible for us to take in.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This cat in the photo came to us with a broken leg, found by the side of road, so we assume hit-and-run. We were able to pay for the surgery (from a local vet who gave us a good discount) with the money we saved from not having to purchase FVRCP vaccines for the cats we had. We received 150 vaccines from Boehringer Ingelheim and this saved us $900 on vaccine expenses. At the time we felt this would enable us to take in 40 more felines. What we were very pleased with is that a local vet matched this grant and provided us with RV free of charge. With this extra bonus we were able to take in 80 felines and totally vet them and get them into new homes. We cannot tell you how much this grant meant to our organization and to the feline lives it saved.

Carolina Pet Adoption & Welfare Society (PAWS) : Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The grant covered various vetting costs for a number of dogs in the rescue. It covered spay/neuters, vaccines, rabies, testing and medication.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We were able to use the funds to rescue additional dogs and fully vet and care for them.

How many pets did this grant help?

At present the grant has been used to help over 10 dogs in the rescue.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Hope is a sweetheart of a dog probably born in 2012. Her New Year started a few days early when friends of Carolina PAWS found her stray outside a moving container on Dec. 29. Hope was underweight at 36 lbs. (she should weigh about 60) and has a skin infection that she is currently being treated for.

Molly, a sweet and very mild-mannered dog, was born approximately August 2010 and looks to be a Boxer/Lab mix. Her ear was permanently disfigured when her first owners decided to try to crop it themselves, without the expertise of a veterinarian. This forever body scar has not deterred her easygoing, loving disposition.

Nina is a Boxer/Lab mix born around March 2013. Nina was recently found homeless, living with her previous owners in a tent. She spent many nights cold and hungry but she remained ever loyal to her owners. They surrendered her to our rescue, realizing they could not give her the care she deserved. Nina is a sweet girl who clearly knows what it means to be a man’s best friend.

Halle is a Terrier/Boxer born approximately September 2012. She is a peppy, happy girl who loves her rope toys and playing in the backyard. She was rescued after being found hungry and cold on the streets. She knows the true meaning of human compassion. She is warm and safe in her new foster home.

Home At Last Humane Society : Pedigree Operational Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The money was used for food and medical supplies.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It paid for a month's worth of food and specifically supplied medicine for two puppies who had mange.

How many pets did this grant help?

It helped feed approximately 60 animals.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Of the 60 animals it helped, there were two who needed special care because they had mange. One was an owner release, the other was dumped at the shelter on a day the shelter was closed. She was left with no food or water and fortunately a passerby noticed this poor puppy on our front porch. We named her Olivia and her skin condition was so bad she barely had any hair. The other dog that had mange was named Mary and it turned out they were siblings. Mary has since been adopted and Olivia is still waiting for her forever home. (Top two photos: Olivia; bottom two photos: Mary)