Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

SPCA of Tompkins County: Mohawk Operation Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The money was used for the veterinary care of shelter animals.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant helped us during our busiest time of year, the spring/early summer months when we take in the largest number of animals. From March 31 to July 17, we took in a total of 431 cats/kittens, 151 dogs, and 15 guinea pigs, rabbits and pet rats. Every animal is medically evaluated and vaccinated upon arrival. This grant helped pay for this work. In particular, this grant helped with the care of cats and kittens, of whom we took in the most, and several of whom needed extra care (the stories of Remi and Dylan are below). At any one time, we house approximately 150 cats in our cat wing.

How many pets did this grant help?

150 (cats in cat wing)

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Remi and Dylan are very young cats, maybe a year old each, who were found abandoned in woodsy areas near the shelter. Remi was found about ½ mile west of the shelter and Dylan was found about ½ east of the shelter, but we believe that they may have come from the same litter. Both cats were severely underweight, covered in scabs, sores and mites, and suffering from URIs and ear infections. Found toward the end of May, these two required a lot of care and treatment to make them ready for adoption. While both are still very small, only about 6 pounds each, they are now ready for new homes! They are pictured here (refusing to hold still, of course), in our cat wing.

Seminole County Animal Services: A Shot at Life Vaccination Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The vaccines we were so delighted to receive were used on hundreds of dogs and cats that came into our shelter. Hundreds that received the vaccines were adopted and getting this grant allowed us to use the funds we would normally use on vaccines for other things to benefit the lives and health of our shelter pets.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Being able to vaccinate for distemper, parvo, feline diseases, bordetella, etc. kept our shelter dogs and cats healthy and on the road to happy new homes. Puppies and kittens in our care received their series of vaccines required to start a new young life on the road to good health.

How many pets did this grant help?

Approx. 500 dogs and 500 cats. (Younger puppies and kitties received more than one vaccine while in our care to follow puppy and kitten vaccine protocol.)

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Veronica came into our shelter as a tiny puppy. She had a severe injury to her leg and had a hard time walking. Vets thought amputation would be best. But, wanting to give her a chance at keeping her leg, the staff worked with her and our "friends" group, TEARS, took Veronica on as a project, getting x-rays and several opinions on what would be best for her. After almost two months it was determined that Veronica could keep her leg and go up for adoption. She was posted on Petfinder and she caught the eye of someone visiting Florida from Mississippi. Amanda came and met Veronica and it was love at first sight. After a couple days wait for her to be spayed, Amanda and Veronica made the trip home to Mississippi, where it is reported she is doing well and loving life thanks to her fresh start at Seminole County Animal Services and starting with her first vaccine from the Shot at Life grant.

Humane Society of the Black Hills: KONG Easy Freeze
What was the money or product used for?

We received product: Kong toys

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The Kong toys were a great past time for our younger dogs and puppies. They were given them at night to help pass the time while being in their kennels.

How many pets did this grant help?

15

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We had a puppy that was brought to us from out of town named White River with injuries to her leg. She is on medical hold until her injuries are resolved. The Kong toy gives her peace while she heals.

Companion Pet Rescue & Transport of W. Tn., Inc.: A Shot at Life Vaccination Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The vaccinations were used for rescue puppies upon intake.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped us with the high cost of vaccinations and allowed us to help with other extraordinary medical care for dogs in need.

How many pets did this grant help?

Approximately 100

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Companion Pet Rescue & Transport takes in and adopts out approximately 200 pups and dogs in need every month. Our rescues come from [open-admission] shelters, strays and unwanted litters of puppies. None of our pups leave our care with less than three vaccinations, so this grant helped us offset the cost of vaccinations. This cost-saving allowed us to handle the cost of other dogs with extraordinary medical needs such as heartworm treatment. Attached are photos of four of the sweet puppies that this grant helped us save!

The Rabbit Haven: Mohawk Operation Grant
What was the money or product used for?

We used the grant funds to establish a “Petfinder Foundation Matching Grant Challenge” pool to match gift donations from the public for specific veterinary cases, dollar-for-dollar until the grant funding is exhausted. We effectively turned your $1,000 funding into a $2,000 medical expense pool to help at-risk rabbits!

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We were able to rescue rabbits with very serious medical conditions, knowing we could use the grant funding as leverage for our efforts to raise funds to cover their high medical costs. Due to the high influx of injured rabbits needing immediate rescue, we expended the grant funding within only six weeks.

How many pets did this grant help?

We were able to save four seriously injured rabbits.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Mitchell was on the euthanasia list at a local shelter. He had significant chemical burns to his hindquarters and sides. Mitchell had a significant loss of skin and fur on his hindquarters and huge areas above his tail where skin was simply gone and the tissue was healing as best it could, in large black masses, and still other areas where the fur was gone and burned skin remained with a leathery peel rising off of him. He was treated for shock, traumatic burns and infection from the wounds. He had to be kept very clean and the temperature in his area controlled. He saw the vet on a regular basis and fortunately did not require surgery. The burns also have affected the area around his eyes, leaving them inflamed. We used $300 of the Petfinder grant as a challenge to raise funds for his care.

Mitchell is an adorable pure white, blue-eyed Rex boy and living miracle. After suffering from serious chemical burns several months ago, he is fully recovered. Mitchell is neutered, calm, gentle and one of the most loving rabbits you will meet. In late April, Mitchell was adopted into his forever home!

The other three bunnies we helped were: Jumanji, abandoned in the rain in a busy parking lot. He had a badly infected tooth removed and was treated for an abscess. We used $350 of the Petfinder grant as a challenge to raise funds for his care. Cassie, left at a shelter with a severely fractured leg. The injury was so severe, the leg had to be amputated. We used $250 of the Petfinder grant as a challenge to raise funds for her care. And Zanie, a former Easter Bunny rescued with a large and dangerous abscess in left eye. Initially, eye-removal surgery was recommended, but the eye was spared, although Zane is blind in one eye. We used $100 of the Petfinder grant as a challenge to raise funds for his care.

Guilford County Animal Shelter: KONG Toy Grant
What was the money or product used for?

We received a box of KONGs and used them as enrichment toys for some of the dogs who have been at the Guilford County Animal Shelter for a longer period of time, as well as some of the dogs going through therapy, like our friend Toby, who was a suspected burn victim. They loved them!

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We were able to provide a safe, more sanitary toy to some happy dogs at the shelter. The KONGs we received are durable, easy to clean, and lots of fun for our pups! This enrichment allowed the dogs something to keep them occupied while spending time in their kennels, between being walked and taken out to play by volunteers. This caused the dogs to become less stressed in their cage, and less destructive with other toys once they got outside.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant helped more than 100 dogs at the Guilford County Animal Shelter, and is continuing to help more! As the dogs are adopted, the KONGs are cleaned, sanitized, and given to other dogs.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Toby, a suspected burn victim, arrived at the Guilford County Animal Shelter in April 2014 with third-degree burns covering over 50% of his body. We immediately began treating him and were pleasantly surprised by his quick recovery and how much hair he was growing back in just weeks! Of course, with the healing process brought lots of itching and skin irritation, so we wanted to soothe him and make his recovery as comfortable as possible. One thing that really helped keep his mind off of his skin was the enrichment we received from you -- a KONG with a small frozen cheese treat inside. He absolutely loves them and it keeps him busy and distracted until the whole ice cube inside is gone. Toby, and the staff at the Guilford County Animal Shelter, thank you!

Dane County Humane Society: A Shot at Life Vaccination Grant
What was the money or product used for?

With much gratitude for the Shot at Life vaccination program, we received vaccines to administer to neighborhood dogs at our Community Dog Day event. During Community Dog Day, after a brief veterinarian exam, we administer free lifesaving vaccines, free flea treatments, and free microchips to dogs; we also give out free engraved dog tags and we have a huge selection of free gently-used dog supplies and free dog food available for dog owners to pick up for their canine family members. We also share information about our services at Dane County Humane Society and local resources and encourage spaying and neutering.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant helped us tremendously by supplying the vaccines for the event. In addition to there being a lot of puppies at the event who had yet to see a veterinarian, more than a third of the dogs that were brought to the event had also never seen a veterinarian previously. Many of these dogs were in great need for the vaccines.

How many pets did this grant help?

102 dogs arrived to Community Dog Day; 88 of them received vaccines.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

There are so many stories to be told from the event. One that sticks in the mind is of Nick and his dog, Lady. Nick had heard in the neighborhood of a dog that needed to be rehomed because her family was moving into an apartment that didn't take dogs. He didn't know the people personally, but he wanted to help the dog and as he loves dogs, Nick wanted to open his home to her. He had just acquired Lady shortly before Community Dog Day, so he was happy that he could bring her to the event to get the necessary vaccines. Lady is a mixed-breed dog; Nick thought there is possibly some golden retriever in her, as she looks like a very short, Chihuahua-sized golden retriever. At the event, a tattered and knotted leash was replaced with a much better functioning one in pink. He also found a collar for her, fulfilling an important need and place to hang a dog tag. Nick said that he couldn't afford the annual fees to utilize the city dog parks. Every morning at 6 a.m., never mind what the weather might be, he has a complete exercise regime in place which involves him taking out his bike for a bike ride with Lady through one of the many public parks that Madison, WI, has. Lady is truly his companion and brings much joy to this life.

During the event, one of the event participants thought of his friend who has six dogs and called him to advise him of the event. Just as we were about to pack everything up, the friend arrives with only two dogs -- since that was all the room he had in his car with other human passengers. He opened the door to his car and out came a pit bull terrier and a brindle mastiff -- with no leashes! We were all shocked and also happy that it was after the event, and asked him where were his leashes -- which he replied that he lived in the country and didn't need any. For such country dogs, 007 (the pit bull terrier) and Big Girl (the mastiff), were completely friendly and well socialized. They both received vaccines. Big Girl was already spayed when Valentino got her from a friend, but 007 wasn't neutered, and unfortunately we couldn't convince him to consider neutering. But the good thing is that 007 and Big Girl were able to receive lifesaving vaccines, as well as goodie bags containing two leashes. We are not sure if the leashes will ever be used, but if Valentino needs them, he will have them.

We had repeat customers from past Community Dog Day events, one of which had six puppies between this year's event and last year's event! Fortunately, the owner was able to find homes for the puppies. We signed her up for a spay/neuter appointment at our shelter. It was also very surprising to see teenagers bringing in their dogs. One young person had trained his German Shepherd puppy to do beautiful "sits." It was very impressive.

On a sad note, a dog had arrived panting and wheezing terribly. The veterinarians deemed it unsafe to vaccinate with the dog in such a state. We couldn't understand why the dog was wheezing so much. It was not exactly an overly-hot day. Some people thought the dog was over-heated. The person bringing the dog was unsure, as well. The veterinarian advised him that the dog needed immediate attention at a vet's office that would be better equipped to assess the situation. Later, I called to schedule a time for the dog to be brought to the shelter to receive her vaccines, and then I learned that the dog had passed away. Princess had belonged to the person's girlfriend who did not take the time to care for her, and so these duties fell on the boyfriend who did not want the dog but cared enough to take her to Community Dog Day. In retrospect, it is possible that Princess had heartworm, as we are presently seeing many heartworm cases at the shelter. Next time, we will be better prepared for such circumstances and have volunteers ready to drive dogs over to an emergency vet clinic so that a ride to an emergency vet clinic can be guaranteed.








Bella-Reed Pit Bull Rescue: Mohawk Operation Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Veterinary care for a few of our medical cases.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

To receive the medical treatment they so desperately needed!

How many pets did this grant help?

2

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Remy was at [an open-admission] shelter after being dumped by her owners after she was hit by a car on Valentine's Day. She had extensive surgery to repair her shattered femur leg bone. The surgery included placing a midline pin, long plate, and six screws with wire to secure the bone properly. She also had a fractured and luxated pelvis, but that did not need reparation surgery. Her first surgery was on Feb. 19. A few months later she needed another surgery to remove the midline pin which shifted, causing pain in her leg and her not being able to use it once again. The grant paid for her second surgery in full!

D&R Rescue, Inc.: Mohawk Operation Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Dog beds

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We know these dog beds will help with the quality of life the dogs have while in our care. We get older, large-breed dogs in who have some hardship getting up off concrete floors and this will help them feel better while in our care. The kennel staff love them due to the fact that they cut down on laundry costs, and in the time it saves them, they can play more with the dogs. We feel the dogs are much happier when off the floor and feel better. We are very pleased with the beds thus far and think they are a great addition to our facility.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant will help hundreds of dogs over the years. We bought high-quality dog beds that we felt would last several years.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

The Doberman you see in one of the pictures was a starvation case we took in. He was skin and bones when brought to our shelter from Animal Control. He had to gain 20 lbs. before the vet would neuter him. He is now in his new home doing wonderfully, and the new owner bought a bed for him like he had at our facility because he loved that bed. We all feel he had never had anything but the ground to sleep on and he loved the bed we provided him.

The Rottweiler was an abuse case who was terrified of people when we took him in. We gave him a bed and for a couple of weeks he would crawl under it and hide, but with time he learned that no one was there to harm him and he started coming out of his shell and started lying on his bed and not under it!

The Min Pin, Ursala, was a dog from a puppy mill who had puppies all her life in a wire cage -- we helped take some dogs from a puppy mill that got shut down and she was one who was so sweet and would crawl under her blankets on the bed to sleep. She was ready to go into a new home within three weeks of getting her.

We all feel the dogs had more in the short time they were with us than they did their entire life prior to coming to us.

NMDOG: Mohawk Operation Grant
What was the money or product used for?

This grant was used to bring a new dog into the NMDOG program and the balance provided training and daily care for a handful of other NMDOGS.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It allowed us to save another dog from tethered misery and assisted in paying for training and daily care for current dogs in the program.

How many pets did this grant help?

3

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Ladybug was picked up running as a stray, dragging her tether. We secured transfer from Animal Control and were able to bring her into the NMDOG program with the funds provided in this grant. She was vetted and is now with us in boarding while we seek out the right foster or forever home for her.