Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

Helping Out Pets Everyday: Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Eye surgery for a rescued dog from the Devore, CA, shelter.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The dog we rescued had an ulcer on her eye. We didn't know what caused the ulcer to form. We took her to an eye specialist, Eye Care for Animals located in Upland, CA. She was diagnosed with a condition called ectopic cilia with the surgical procedure cctopic cilia removal with cryotherapy.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Ellie, a sweet 9-month-old puppy, was rescued from the [open-admission] Devore, CA, shelter on her last day. She came to us where we provided all the necessary medical care, spay surgery, microchip, all necessary vaccinations, fecal exam. We began to showcase her for adoption after her initial well check. We noticed she was closing her right eye. Upon further examination, our primary veterinarian where she was boarding found she had developed an ulcer. After treating her with antibiotic ointment for two weeks with no improvement, we decided to take her to an eye specialist.

On June 18, 2014, we had our initial consultation at Eye Care for Animals, in Upland, CA. Upon examination by Nancy Park, DVM, we were told after the tonometry and fluorescein stain that Ellie had a condition called ectopic cilia. The following day, Thursday, June 19, 2014, Ellie underwent surgery for ectopic cilia removal with cryotherapy on her right eye. She is now in the recovery mode and will return for a follow up appointment the week of July 1.

Ellie has a family waiting to adopt her once she is healed, so there's a happy ending waiting to follow. We are very thankful for the Orvis Operational Grant because it helped us provide this much-needed surgery for our precious Ellie!

THANK YOU SO MUCH!

Loving Companions Animal Rescue, Inc.: Shelter+ Challenge
What was the money or product used for?

To complete repairs of the facility.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant assisted our organization by helping to provide funds to repair fencing, paint, repair several heating units, and buy cleaning supplies. All of these items aid in making the surroundings more comfortable and enjoyable for the animals in our care.

How many pets did this grant help?

We currently have 123 pets on site.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We took in a dog that had jumped out of the back of a moving truck and broke her leg. The owners did not want or could not afford to give the dog medical assistance and ask that we take her. We provided funds to have surgery done to repair the broken leg and then held the dog while it was healing and then were able to find a new home for her. She is a very pretty and gentle dog and has made the new family a very nice companion.

Animal Rescue League of Iowa, Inc.: Cat Castles
What was the money or product used for?

The Animal Rescue League of Iowa, Inc. (ARL) received a grant of 1,200 Cat Castles for the comfort and enrichment of the cats in our care as they wait to be available for adoption, and in adoption.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

In 2013 the ARL took in over 7,000 cats and kittens in our shelter and sadly we do not anticipate our intake numbers to be reduced dramatically (but hopefully lower -- our many community outreach programs efforts are focused on reducing the number of intakes and to help keep pets in their homes). With so many cats/kittens in our care we are grateful for the grant of the Cat Castles. We have witnessed a decrease in stress, a faster healing time for cats while in isolation, an increase in enrichment and stimulation; all of which helps the cats to be adoptable. The Cat Castles have had a huge effect on the cats and the staff at our shelter; we are not sure who is happier about the boxes: the cats or the animal care techs who care for the cats. Either way it is a win-win for all!

How many pets did this grant help?

1,200+

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Tom and Huck were 3-year-old Siamese cats that came to the ARL as strays. The ARL has a bonded buddy program which "bonds" animals that come to the shelter from the same home or are found as strays together so then they will be remain together and must be adopted to the same home. This bonded pair were very shy, Tom in particular. It was determined by our cat behaviorist that Tom was too shy to go to directly to adoption, so they were office fostered in one of our administrative staff members' office. Tom and Huck were set up in the office with everything they needed, which included a Cat Castle! When Tom and his brother Huck were brought to the office, Tom went right to the Castle and for the first few days he only came out of the Cat Castle at night. As he became more comfortable in the office and with the staff member, he slowly started to gain confidence and trust of the staff member and others. After about two months of office foster time, Tom and Huck were ready to be available for adoption; instead of being moved to the adoption area, they stayed in the office and were made available for adoption on the ARL website. Soon a potential adopter inquired, and came to the shelter to meet Tom and Huck in "their office." Tom and Huck were adopted together and the Cat Castle went with them to their forever home to help with the transition.

Animal Rescue League of Iowa, Inc.: Stretch and Scratch Cat Scratchers
What was the money or product used for?

The Animal Rescue League of Iowa, Inc. (ARL) received a grant of Stretch and Scratch cat scratchers for the enrichment of the cats in our care as they wait to be available for adoption, and in adoption.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

In 2013 the ARL took in over 7,000 cats and kittens in our shelter and sadly we do not anticipate our intake numbers to be reduced dramatically (but hopefully lower -- our many community outreach programs efforts are focused on reducing the number of intakes and to help keep pets in their homes). With so many cats/kittens in our care and the reality of them being in stainless steel kennels (for disease and germ control) we recognize that the kennels do not provide enrichment and stimulation opportunities for the cats/kittens. The ARL gratefully uses the Stretch and Scratch cat scratchers for the stimulation and enrichment of the cats/kittens which reduces boredom, stress and illness.

How many pets did this grant help?

3,000

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Carter is an adult cat who came to the ARL with an old injury to his right rear leg; he had surgery to repair the injury and was on cage rest and now has limited activity. The Stretch and Scratch cat scratcher has provided Carter with much comfort and stimulation and we are sure it helped him to heal and remain happy and content during his restriction.

Adopt-A-Dog Inc.: Perkins Bordetella Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Grant monies were used to purchase vaccines such as Bordetella, materials for injection and other related costs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

All new intakes into the shelter that qualified (both non-vaccinated and pets needing boosters) were treated and properly vaccinated.

How many pets did this grant help?

Approximately 60-75 dogs

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Due to proper and routine vaccination at our shelter, kennel cough was prevented. By having the costs of vaccines covered by a grant, funds that would otherwise be dedicated to vaccinating pets can be used for other things, such as building our enrichment program, which helps reduce stresses in the kenneling environment. Also, by having the risk of kennel cough reduced, the related costs to a dog who may have contracted kennel cough have been removed, hence more monies saved for the shelter.

L.E.A.N./All Vegas Horses: Mohawk Operation Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Rehabilitation of horses taken into the L.E.A.N. rescue program, specifically feed, medical, and farriery.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Each horse we rescue requires an average of $150/month in these expenses and we have taken in six new horses in this year alone (a total of 39 since our inception in March 2012). We could not continue to take these animals from the auction/slaughter pipeline without adequate funding for care. Petfinder Foundation grants continue to help us be able to afford these costs.

How many pets did this grant help?

Six new horses in 2014

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Little Penelope is an older mare with a sweet disposition. She was picked up by Animal Control after neighbors complained that an owner had a horse with an untreated broken leg. In fact, her leg was not broken but due to fused hocks, she tended to stand with one leg cocked at an alarming angle. Either way, her owners could not afford any care to help ease her discomfort and she was considerably underweight as well. Animal Control accepted surrender from her owner. Upon x-rays funded by L.E.A.N., it was determined she simply had advanced osteoarthritis and poor conformation. She was never going to be a riding horse again, but aged only in her late teens she still had lots of love to give a family. L.E.A.N. took her into the program and placed her in the care of a new foster who is also a certified journeyman farrier. She was trimmed, received a dental for her teeth, was put on a senior grain formula, and introduced to a new herd in her foster home. A new joint formula is being used to aid in her comfort. She loves her new friends and has blossomed into a lovely, kid-friendly mare. We hope to find her a family who will accept her as a pasture pet and allow her to live out her days in peace. Until then, she enjoys top-notch care and safety in L.E.A.N.

Desert Dogs Rescue: P.L.A.Y. Pet Beds
What was the money or product used for?

All beds used on my sanctuary senior animals

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It really made a lot of forgotten senior animals more comfortable. They all loved the beds!!

How many pets did this grant help?

20

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

I was driving to work and found a mom dog who had been dumped off on the side of the road and she had just given birth to five puppies. I packed them up and took them home and the only place I had for them was the master bathtub! Your beds made it much more comfortable for them.

Ridgefield Operation for Animal Rescue: Perkins Bordetella Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The generous grant of $1,250 was/will be used to purchase bordetella vaccinations and associated veterinary expenses.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped by providing protection to our dogs and pups against kennel cough. In turn, it also helped keep our veterinary expenses down as kennel cough can be costly to treat. It also helped get our dogs adopted in a more timely manner since there was no quarantine time (which can sometimes be more that two weeks) in order to treat a dog for kennel cough.

How many pets did this grant help?

83 dogs have been/will be benefiting from this generous grant.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Nola (a 2-year-old mountain cur mix) came to ROAR on March 9 with her nine(!) 5-week-old puppies. Upon her arrival at ROAR, we found out Nola was positive for heartworm (and a skin fungus). Because she was able to immediately receive the bordetella vaccine (provided by the generous grant), kennel cough was not a worry, especially since we had to concentrate on treating the heartworms. The pups also received the bordetella vaccine and thus their very young immune systems were not compromised by kennel cough. The pictures are of Nola at her new home and three of the nine pups when they were at ROAR (all nine have been adopted).

Upper Rio Grande Animal Society: P.L.A.Y. Pet Beds
What was the money or product used for?

The 10 Special Edition Chill Pads were used to keep the shelter dogs warm during the cold winter months.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

There are two local thrift stores that donate blankets and bedding to the shelter, along with many individuals. These items are very expensive to purchase and during the winter months are very much needed to keep the dogs comfortable. The Chill beds were very helpful not only during the winter, but also when the weather is cool and damp.

How many pets did this grant help?

30

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Edward, a 2-month-old American Blue Heeler, was lucky to have been found on a street in Monte Vista, CO, during the winter when the temperatures were severely freezing. He was found by a caring individual who knew to bring him to the shelter. There is a good possibility he would have not survived. He was adopted after only spending eight days at the shelter. But not surprising ... how could anyone resist this cute little guy?!

Philadelphia Animal Welfare Society: Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The grant supported PAWS' efforts to rescue, house, care for, and adopt out homeless dogs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant enabled us to save dogs' lives and helped to ensure that we can continue doing so for dogs who need us. Every dog rescued by PAWS receives a full medical and behavioral evaluation, spay/neuter surgery, microchip, treatments for any medical conditions it may have, as well as behavior enrichment tailored to each dog's needs and length of stay.

How many pets did this grant help?

386

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Mona was found as a stray in South Philly in July 2013, then rescued by PAWS. Despite her wonderful personality, she waited for months for a home. This energetic girl became a staff and volunteer favorite during her stay and was always eager to play fetch and go running. Mona was adopted and now lives happily in Levittown with a father and son. She seemed so proud to become a family dog, and we were proud, too! As soon as Mona left the building, we were able to rescue a new dog to fill her kennel.