Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

Bella-Reed Pit Bull Rescue: Mohawk Operation Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Veterinary care for a few of our medical cases.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

To receive the medical treatment they so desperately needed!

How many pets did this grant help?

2

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Remy was at [an open-admission] shelter after being dumped by her owners after she was hit by a car on Valentine's Day. She had extensive surgery to repair her shattered femur leg bone. The surgery included placing a midline pin, long plate, and six screws with wire to secure the bone properly. She also had a fractured and luxated pelvis, but that did not need reparation surgery. Her first surgery was on Feb. 19. A few months later she needed another surgery to remove the midline pin which shifted, causing pain in her leg and her not being able to use it once again. The grant paid for her second surgery in full!

D&R Rescue, Inc.: Mohawk Operation Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Dog beds

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We know these dog beds will help with the quality of life the dogs have while in our care. We get older, large-breed dogs in who have some hardship getting up off concrete floors and this will help them feel better while in our care. The kennel staff love them due to the fact that they cut down on laundry costs, and in the time it saves them, they can play more with the dogs. We feel the dogs are much happier when off the floor and feel better. We are very pleased with the beds thus far and think they are a great addition to our facility.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant will help hundreds of dogs over the years. We bought high-quality dog beds that we felt would last several years.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

The Doberman you see in one of the pictures was a starvation case we took in. He was skin and bones when brought to our shelter from Animal Control. He had to gain 20 lbs. before the vet would neuter him. He is now in his new home doing wonderfully, and the new owner bought a bed for him like he had at our facility because he loved that bed. We all feel he had never had anything but the ground to sleep on and he loved the bed we provided him.

The Rottweiler was an abuse case who was terrified of people when we took him in. We gave him a bed and for a couple of weeks he would crawl under it and hide, but with time he learned that no one was there to harm him and he started coming out of his shell and started lying on his bed and not under it!

The Min Pin, Ursala, was a dog from a puppy mill who had puppies all her life in a wire cage -- we helped take some dogs from a puppy mill that got shut down and she was one who was so sweet and would crawl under her blankets on the bed to sleep. She was ready to go into a new home within three weeks of getting her.

We all feel the dogs had more in the short time they were with us than they did their entire life prior to coming to us.

NMDOG: Mohawk Operation Grant
What was the money or product used for?

This grant was used to bring a new dog into the NMDOG program and the balance provided training and daily care for a handful of other NMDOGS.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It allowed us to save another dog from tethered misery and assisted in paying for training and daily care for current dogs in the program.

How many pets did this grant help?

3

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Ladybug was picked up running as a stray, dragging her tether. We secured transfer from Animal Control and were able to bring her into the NMDOG program with the funds provided in this grant. She was vetted and is now with us in boarding while we seek out the right foster or forever home for her.

Baltimore Animal Rescue and Care Shelter (BARCS): Mohawk Operation Grant
What was the money or product used for?

This generous Mohawk Flooring Operation grant of $1,000 was used to purchase 950 "Training Your Adopted Dog" DVDs (one of the DVD sponsors is Petfinder.com) to be given out in our dog-adoption packets to new dog adopters.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

So many of the pet adopters at BARCS are first-time pet parents. We had been giving these DVDS out, but ran out of them. This grant enabled us to purchase almost 1,000 more and we've found them to be so helpful once the family gets their new dog home, especially for those that never had a dog before. The DVD covers: Crate Training, House Training, Destructive Chewing, Jumping, Mouthing, and Fun Tricks and Obedience. Our pet parents have told us over and over how helpful this wonderful DVD has been in training their new pup.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant will help 950 dogs as they leave for their forever homes.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Tenzo was just a bundle of energy when Animal Control brought him to BARCS as a stray. He's a love bug and was hoping to find someone to shower with licks and kisses and someone who had as much energy as he does. In came Kaitlin, an avid jogger and outdoorswoman who fell head over heels in love with Tenzo. This is her first dog as an adult and she says she watched the DVD over and over so she could properly get Tenzo's energy harnessed and that he would listen to her commands when outdoors so everyone stays safe and has a great time. The photos below tell it all!

Humane Society of North Iowa: KONG Toy Grant
What was the money or product used for?

We received 30 KONG toys of various sizes to use in our shelter. We have really gotten a lot of use out of them and the dogs love them! We fill them with a combination of donated items: peanut butter, oatmeal, Cheerios and honey. We also use the ice cube trays we received with the KONGs to make "pup-cicles!" The dogs love it!

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

When we give a dog a KONG toy, they are stimulated for a period of time. This decreases boredom in the kennel and helps them to stay busy.

How many pets did this grant help?

An average of 30 (the number of KONGs we were granted) each time we use them.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We have one dog in particular, Goldie, who suffers from what we refer to as a the dog version of ADHD and a little bit of OCD as well. She's 11 years old and had lived her life prior to entry in our shelter in a kennel behind someone's garage with little to no human interaction. When she came into our shelter, she was so wild and frantic that volunteers had a hard time walking her. With a combination of medication and the use of a KONG in her kennel each day, Goldie has settled down dramatically and is much easier for volunteers to handle.

Senior Animals In Need Today Society (SAINTS): Shelter+ Challenge
What was the money or product used for?

The money was used for veterinary care.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant enabled us to provide necessary medical treatments to the animals in our care, as follows:

EastRidge Animal Hospital
January 2, 2014
Ollie (dog) – exam, bloodwork, antibiotics
$231.20

EastRidge Animal Hospital
January 16, 2014
Salty (dog) – geriatric neuter, dental (with 19 extractions), pain medication, tissue biopsy (for testicular tumour)
$784.39

Total = $1,015.59

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant helped two dogs.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Local animal control found a senior beagle named Ollie running loose and picked him up. Sadly, his family never came to claim him, so he was brought to SAINTS. When he arrived at our shelter, Ollie was incredibly overweight – 60 pounds! – and was suffering from chronic skin and ear issues. Fortunately, relief was in sight. He was given a medicated bath and put on antibiotics, ear drops, and pain medication for his sore hips. He had his ears flushed and bloodwork done to rule out any underlying causes of his weight problem. Through it all, Ollie remained a good-natured dog and fit in well at SAINTS. With regular low-impact swimming sessions, he even began to lose some weight.

Happily, Ollie was adopted only a few months later by a veterinarian with a soft spot for hefty beagles with health issues. He has settled in well in his new home where all his medical needs are met and he can continue his weight-loss journey.

Salty, an ancient Jack Russell terrier, was transferred to SAINTS from local animal control. As an unclaimed stray, he was in rough shape – skinny with cataracts and a mouthful of rotten teeth. After settling in at SAINTS, Salty was taken to the veterinarian for assessment. Not surprisingly, his bloodwork showed a number of abnormalities, likely the result of his severe periodontal disease. Luckily, however, he was cleared for surgery.

Salty ended up having 19 extractions, as almost all of his teeth were abscessed right to the roots. He was neutered at the same time, and put on pain medication and antibiotics. With his sore, infected mouth finally healing, Salty began to perk up and put on some much-needed weight. A few months later, a woman who had previously adopted a senior dog from SAINTS stopped by to let us know that he had passed away. While visiting our shelter, she fell in love with Salty and decided to once again give a deserving senior a forever family. She reports that he is doing well in his new home.

Helping Hand Pet Rescue of WV: KONG Easy Freeze
What was the money or product used for?

We used the money we made for medical care and food for the animals.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We were able to use some of the product for the dogs in the rescue on really hot days and some of the product we sold at adoption events, bake sales, car washes and various other activities we have had.

How many pets did this grant help?

63

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We used part of the money from this grant to obtain surgery for a furry friend in need. He needed a stent to help him with his kidneys. Without this surgery he would have either drowned in his own fluids or have to have been put down. Shortly after his surgery he found his forever home.

Three Sisters Pet Rescue/Ohio Hound Rescue: Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

We used the grant to help some dogs become more adoptable. And also to increase visibility at adoption events.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

By paying for extra vet care (beyond just neuter/ shots and routine care).

By allowing a trainer/daycare evaluation.

By helping us purchase items to be used at adoption events.

How many pets did this grant help?

Many, but two in particular.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Martin came to us with very bad ear infections and some rotted teeth. He was labeled "stubborn and reactive" initially, but this was all due to pain. Because of the grant from the Petfinder Foundation and Orvis, we were able to deal with Martin's pain and prove that he is an awesome dog. He has now been adopted by a loving family that reports he is the best-behaved dog ever. I am attaching some pics of Martin while he was in rescue and one pic of him with his new family.

The other dog being helped by the grant is about to receive an FHO [femoral head ostectomy - a surgical procedure designed to alleviate hip pain]. I can report back on him soon!

The Humane Society of Hobart: A Shot at Life Vaccination Grant
What was the money or product used for?

For vaccination of healthy susceptible dogs and puppies against canine upper respiratory infection (kennel cough) caused by canine parainfluenza and Bordetella bronchiseptica. Also for subcutaneous vaccination of healthy cats, eight weeks of age or older, as an aid in the prevention of disease caused by feline rhinotracheitis, calici, panleukopenia viruses and as an aid in the reduction of the severity of disease due to feline Chlamydia psittaci.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The Humane Society of Hobart believes that the vaccinations helped prevent and/or reduce the number animals which contracted viruses or conditions which are common in animal shelters and animal-control agencies.

How many pets did this grant help?

Humane Society of Hobart received the Boehringer Ingelheim Vaccination Grant the first week of February, 2014. The organization was able to vaccinate approximately 35 felines before the expiration date of 2/28/2014 that vaccination containers of Fel-O-Gard were labeled with. The Humane Society of Hobart was able to vaccinate approximately 75 of the adoptable canines before the expiration date of 6/30/2014 printed on the containers of Naramune. Humane Society of Hobart contacted Boehringer Ingelheim support @ 1-866-METACAM for instructions on further use of the expired date-code vaccination. The shelter was instructed to properly dispose of the unused vaccinations that were past their expiration date.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Clifford was a young Shepherd-Chow mix pup about 7 months old when he arrived at the shelter as a stray in late January 2014. Because of his energy level, enthusiasm and lack of training he was passed over by many potential adopters until a great family adopted him in early March 2014, where he currently lives with enough children to keep him busy. It is very likely that Clifford was able to stay healthy during his long stay at the shelter because of the Boehringer Ingelheim vaccination that he received when the grant was first received.

Mabel was a mature female Pointer who arrived at The Humane Society of Hobart in February 2014 as a stray who went unclaimed. Mabel was very shy and timid at the shelter and few people asked to see her during the first several weeks of her availability. Mabel was adopted in late March 2014 by a single woman who traveled a long distance to meet her and fell in love with her. Mabel was protected from common shelter viruses by the Boehringer Ingelheim Vaccination Grant.

Lucy is an extra-large domestic mix cat who arrived at The Humane Society of Hobart in February 2014. Due to her size and unique personality, she has found it difficult to get adopted. Lucy continues to be available for adoption and is protected by the Boehringer Ingelheim Vaccination Grant. Meet Lucy: https://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/29009316

Zeus is a 5-month-old Shepherd-Labrador mix who is extremely energetic and active. Due to his enthusiasm level and lack of training he is finding it difficult to get qualified adoption applications. Zeus arrived at The Humane Society of Hobart in May 2014 and continues to be available for adoption and is protected by the Boehringer-Ingelheim Vaccination Grant. Meet Zeus: https://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/29446977

Helping Out Pets Everyday: Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Eye surgery for a rescued dog from the Devore, CA, shelter.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The dog we rescued had an ulcer on her eye. We didn't know what caused the ulcer to form. We took her to an eye specialist, Eye Care for Animals located in Upland, CA. She was diagnosed with a condition called ectopic cilia with the surgical procedure cctopic cilia removal with cryotherapy.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Ellie, a sweet 9-month-old puppy, was rescued from the [open-admission] Devore, CA, shelter on her last day. She came to us where we provided all the necessary medical care, spay surgery, microchip, all necessary vaccinations, fecal exam. We began to showcase her for adoption after her initial well check. We noticed she was closing her right eye. Upon further examination, our primary veterinarian where she was boarding found she had developed an ulcer. After treating her with antibiotic ointment for two weeks with no improvement, we decided to take her to an eye specialist.

On June 18, 2014, we had our initial consultation at Eye Care for Animals, in Upland, CA. Upon examination by Nancy Park, DVM, we were told after the tonometry and fluorescein stain that Ellie had a condition called ectopic cilia. The following day, Thursday, June 19, 2014, Ellie underwent surgery for ectopic cilia removal with cryotherapy on her right eye. She is now in the recovery mode and will return for a follow up appointment the week of July 1.

Ellie has a family waiting to adopt her once she is healed, so there's a happy ending waiting to follow. We are very thankful for the Orvis Operational Grant because it helped us provide this much-needed surgery for our precious Ellie!

THANK YOU SO MUCH!