Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

PurrHaven, Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

To remove the right eye of Hercules to save his life and so he would become an adoptable kitten.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Hercules was adopted to his forever home (along with two of his buddies who went to the same home) on Sept. 10, 2018, two months after his lifesaving surgery.

How many pets did this grant help?

one

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We are so fortunate to have received the Petfinder Foundation Emergency Medical Grant for Hercules, one of 17 kittens from our Sharpsburg Maryland Landing TNR project. Hercules desperately needed his right removed quickly to alleviate his suffering. I applied to your Foundation in July and, within a week, the funds were approved. Hercules barely weighed 2 lbs. when the fabulous staff at Spay Now Laurel performed the surgery. He recovered quickly, and he was adopted to his forever home on this week after we listed him on Petfinder along with his pal Sabrina. Attached is a link to a video his new dad sent us of Hercules playing along with Sabrina and Tabitha, whom we also had listed on Petfinder. We really needed your help to cover this unexpected emergency-medical issue. We are a small organization and I can't tell you how much your help meant to us. Thank you.
https://youtu.be/isA8nRrHV7wrn

Feline Foundation of Greater Washington (FFGW): Cat Enrichment
What was the money or product used for?

The $800 grant was used to purchase cat-enrichment supplies including interactive toys, comfortable bedding, and Feliway calming pheromone spray. In order to provide items with the greatest impact, we asked our volunteers directly: What products would you most like to have for the cats in your care? The response was quick and enthusiastic! They wanted and received cat trees, sherpa igloos, Cat Dancer toys, turbo chasers/scratchers, travel-size Feliway, catnip and wand toys. It felt like a surprise birthday party! The larger items are retained by the fosters for ongoing use, and favorite toys or beds go with the cats as they move to their forever homes.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant money allowed us to purchase items that had an immediate positive impact on the cats housed by our foster-based rescue volunteers. In addition to providing stimulating toys and comforting resting areas for the cats themselves, the grant also had a positive impact on our fosters. These funds allowed FFGW to be responsive to requests from fosters for items they need in order to provide the best possible care for animals who are often scared, timid, and anxious as they enter a new environment. By making the foster experience as easy as possible for felines and humans alike, the cats are adopted faster, and the fosters feel confident and are quickly ready to accept the next needy cat. This is clearly a win-win situation, as it increases our rescue capacity and saves more lives!

How many pets did this grant help?

40 and counting!

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Patches was removed from a hoarding situation, weaned from her kittens, spayed, and housed in two foster homes. In short, by the time I met her she was tired, scared and withdrawn. I was warned that she would be a long-term project. My first goal was to provide a calm space for her to relax, so I set up a Feliway diffuser in a quiet room. After two days of her hiding under the bed, I wanted to encourage interaction, so I reached for the irresistible Cat Dancer. She started playing before the crinkly package was even open! Two days later, Patches was happily exploring the larger surroundings -- the perfect time to introduce a catnip-infused cardboard scratcher. My "long-term project" was adopted on Day 7 and went home with a delighted 10-year-old girl! THANK YOU, PETFINDER FOUNDATION!

Have A Heart Pet Shelter: Petfinder Adoption Options in Action Grant (Invitation Only)
What was the money or product used for?

The grant money was used to construct four quarantine kennels to keep newly admitted dogs, puppies and kennel residents who become ill from spreading disease. The request for this grant was based upon education received at the Adoption Options seminar on common infectious diseases.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Prior to having the solid-wall quarantine kennels, we only had two small chain-link kennels that were separated from other kennels by about a foot of space. When they were being cleaned, water would flow between them and potentially contaminate adjoining kennels. Due to insufficient quarantine kennels, we would not accept very young puppies into the shelter, since we felt they should be quarantined for a minimum of 14 days. We also were constantly worried about the spread of internal and external parasites between newly admitted dogs or dogs who became symptomatic during their stay. Since the completion of the four quarantine kennels at the end of August, we have admitted seven dogs into those kennels. Six were new intakes (including two young pups) and one was a dog who had been in the shelter and presented with symptoms of diarrhea with unknown origin.

How many pets did this grant help?

Seven dogs have benefit from the quarantine kennels in approximately two weeks.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

JoJo is a 4- to 5-year-old male Yorkie. JoJo was found as a stray in horrible condition on a rural county road. It was evident from his condition that he had not been cared for over a long period of time. He was loaded with ticks and fleas, and his coat was so matted that you could not find his skin. We immediately gave him Capstar, wormed him and had him groomed to get rid of the nasty mess he was in. The first photo shows what he looked like at intake. Note that he was also vomiting. Photo 2 shows JoJo in one of our new quarantine kennels. He was the first dog to use the new kennels. Photo 3 shows JoJo on adoption day. In his short stay in quarantine, he was given all his vaccines, neutered, wormed, tested for heartworms and put on prevention for both internal and external parasites.

The fourth photo shows the building process so you can see what we had to do. The four quarantine kennels cost $2,203 to complete thanks to the masonry all being done by volunteers. Thank you Petfinder Foundation, for improving the quality of life of our shelter animals.

Humane Educational Society: Dogs Playing for Life Mentorship Grant (Invitation Only)
What was the money or product used for?

The money was used to pay the tuition for a Dogs Playing for Life mentorship in Longmont, Colorado.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped by allowing me the opportunity to attend the mentorship and learn the protocols of the DPFL program, thus giving me the knowledge and tools to implement safe and effective playgroups for the dogs at our shelter.

How many pets did this grant help?

Since starting the playgroups in July, we have had approximately 150 different dogs come out for our playgroups. Each week, more dogs are added to the list of those approved for playgroups, so the number continues to grow.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Zane was a dog who especially benefited from this grant. For a while, he was labeled as a dog who could not be out with other dogs. He was at our shelter for several months hoping to find a forever home. Once we introduced him to playgroups, however, we found that he was one of the most playful, social, and dog-friendly dogs ever. In fact, he became a Playgroup Rock Star and helper dog. Because we learned more about his true personality through playgroups, Zane was able to go on a transport to Wisconsin and was adopted within a week of being there.

Partnership for Paws, Inc.: Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

This grant was used to provide obedience training for several of our dogs in order to make them more adoptable.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Training is a very important part of rescue, as most of the dogs we pull from shelters ended up there because of a lack of training. The typical cost to use professional training for dogs who require it is $200-300 per dog.

How many pets did this grant help?

Four dogs were helped by this grant

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This is Scout. He was rescued after being found as a stray with his two sisters. They were living off of leftover fish guts and parts that they were getting from the trash outside of a local fish market. These dogs were semi-feral and had been living off the streets for some time. In order to bring them to rescue, they had to be trapped. They were very skittish and fearful of being handled by humans. After giving them a lot of love and patience, we were able to get them to the point where they could walk on a leash and attend obedience-training classes, mostly just for the socialization aspect. Scout and his sisters flourished with this training and Scout found a forever home in June! We are very grateful for the generosity of Orvis and the Petfinder Foundation, which allowed us to pay for the training they so desperately needed. Thank you!

God's Feral Felines, Inc. : P.L.A.Y. Pet Beds
What was the money or product used for?

Our kitten-rescue program is based around orphaned babies who need to be bottle-fed. The beds were used and continue to be used for this program.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Most important in caring for bottle-fed babies is being able to keep them warm. This comes even before feeding the kittens. In fact, feeding a kitten who is cold can kill it! These beds were able to be used in conjunction with heating pads to provide a desired amount of heat to reach the kitten without being concerned that the kittens were getting overheated, which is a concern when using either sheets or towels. A side benefit to using towels is that the kittens have a tendency to get their claws hooked in them. Your beds solved this problem.

How many pets did this grant help?

As these beds continue to be used, this question is not able to be reasonably answered. To date, we have rescued 148 kittens, but these beds will most likely be used for years to come.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

God's Feral Felines seldom takes in adult cats. The third photo, however, shows Bella and her litter. The owner was trying to give away Mama and the babies all individually when the kittens were only three weeks old. Mama and babies are now comfortably in a foster home. When the babies are weaned and litter-trained, they will be moved to another foster home until they reach 2 lbs. and can then be fixed and put up for adoption. Mama Bella will be fixed approximately two weeks after she stops nursing the kittens and will also at that time be put up for adoption.

Upper Peninsula Animal Welfare : KONG Toy Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The Kongs are used for enrichment for the shelter dogs to keep them mentally and physically happy while they wait for their forever homes.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We put peanut butter or grain-free wet food in the Kongs and freeze them. The dogs love it.

How many pets did this grant help?

Well we reuse the Kongs over and over after each use (we, of course, clean them) so it's helping 100s of dogs.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Nahla is a dog for adoption who has been with us for a long time. She is dog-selective so that is holding her back some from being adopted sooner. She is getting stressed at the shelter so we have her in the office with us. She has toys and a comfy bed, but mostly she loves her peanut-butter Kongs! She is the dog in the first photo. Here is her link: www.petfinder.com/petdetail/42684369

Feline Friends of Ruff Love Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Hospitalization/ICU care

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Kermit's medical bill would have been a large, unexpected amount that would have been difficult for our small group to cover. We are so grateful to have received the grant and been able to cover his hospital stay at Thomasville Emergency Vet.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

A volunteer stopped at a woman's house that had more than 30 kittens in the yard. The majority of them were ill with flea infestations and upper-respiratory infections. If left untreated, these infections can lead to painful and disturbing injuries, just as poor Kermit experienced. Our volunteer scooped up the three most urgent cases and feared they would not survive the ride to the vet. Two of the kittens taken from the home passed away at the vet. Kermit is the sole survivor.

Kermit received around-the-clock care and intense antibiotics. Once he was released from the emergency vet about two weeks later, he went into his foster home. Kermit stopped eating about three days after his release and it was determined that his injured eye was causing pain. The vet wanted to delay the eye removal if possible to let his weakened body heal more. However, surgery was needed ASAP. He was put on pain meds and began eating, and surgery was scheduled for his neuter and eye removal.

Kermit came through surgery wonderfully and has flourished in his foster home. He is one of the most affectionate cats his foster family has ever seen. Kermit sleeps on his foster mom every night and purrs constantly. He gets along wonderfully with other animals and will make the purrfect addition to a forever family. Meet him: www.petfinder.com/petdetail/42398006

Pope Memorial Humane Society: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

To help a little Chihuahua-mix dog who had been stepped on, her leg severely fractured. The injury required an orthopedic surgeon to place a pin down the center of the bone, a bracket and several permanent screws. After six weeks of confined rest, this young dog was able to be placed in a loving home and has a second chance at a quality life. The Petfinder Foundation grant covered over half of the total vet and surgeon fees.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

More than ever before, we are seeing pets surrendered because owners cannot pay for a needed procedure. The demographics in our area are such that no vet will extend care that is not fully paid for up front. Unfortunately, this means that owners have only the choice of euthanizing their pets or surrendering them. This shelter is the last resort for these pets having a chance at life, literally. The financial burden of any one of these situations takes precious donations away from other areas -- medical care, operations, quality food -- for the other residents, and so we are incredibly grateful for this award and for the Petfinder Foundation having this program.

How many pets did this grant help?

One super cute one

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Recently we were asked to take a 6-lb. Chihuahua mix named Millie. Her owner had accidentally stepped on her and Millie sustained a compound fracture of one back leg. Her owner could not afford to have it repaired. The break was serious, shearing off the top of her leg bone, and would require a pin, bracket and screws. Off Millie went to the vet and orthopedic surgeon. After six weeks of crate rest with a foster, Millie has been happily adopted by a wonderful person who insists that she is now owned by Millie, not the other way around.

This shelter literally exists because of our donors, and this type of rescue is very costly -- in fact, the total cost was close to $2,000. We reached out to the Petfinder Foundation through its Emergency Medical Grant program, and were thrilled when we were awarded $1,000 to help offset the cost. Petfinder.com is already a great partner in finding animals new, loving homes, and now the Petfinder Foundation has directly helped a little dog get a second chance at a happy life. Thank you to our donors, and thank you to the Petfinder Foundation!

Santa Cruz Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals: Build-A-Bear Youth Humane Education Grant
What was the money or product used for?

We used $1,650 this year to offer full-coverage scholarships to our summer-camp for students who would normally not be able to afford it.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

-It helped us to bring humane education to the most underserved members of our community
-Each of the campers wrote a story or made a video that went up on our website to help get one of our adoptable animals a home.

How many pets did this grant help?

Six shelter pets, as well as the animals already in the homes of each of these campers.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

ADOPTED! Hi, I'm Randall (first photo). Once I know you, I will jump into your arms and kiss your face. I love to go on walks and I walk really well on my leash. I am still pretty young, so I would really like to go to a training class and have lots of playtime with you and other dogs. As I can be a bit shy at first, I would feel most comfortable with older kids who can give me my space when I need it. If I sound like the puppy for you then please adopt me! [Written by summer camper Allison, age 9]

ADOPTED on June 28, 2018! Hi, my name is Paula (second photo). I am small and shy, but I can be very sweet once I get to know you. I would much rather have a quiet, adult home, as young children might be too much for me. I need lots of love, especially since it takes time for me to warm up to people. I had a special surgery on my back legs and now I am all better! [Written by summer camper Vivienne, age 6]

ADOPTED! Hi, I'm Diamond (third photo). I might be a little shy at first, but once I get used to you, I will wag my tail and jump in your lap. I hope you will adopt me soon! [Written by summer campers Ava, age 7, and Kenia, age 9]