Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

Texas Pawprints: COVID-19 Operation Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The money was used to pay for spay and neuter surgeries, age-appropriate vaccinations, and FIV/FeLV tests for cats and kittens.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We are a 100% foster-based organization. All our adoptions come from in-home meetings or from scheduled adoption events that we hold at various Petsmart locations on the weekends. However, due to social-distancing guidelines and recent shelter-in-place orders by our county, we had to temporarily cease all store adoption events for several months.

The majority of our operating income is from adoption fees and donations. Since we could not continue adoptions, we had almost no income during that time.

This grant allowed us to be able to continue to provide basic medical care (vaccinations, spay/neuter, FIV/FeLV tests) for the cats and kittens that we kept accepting from shelters and members of the community despite the business shutdown.

How many pets did this grant help?

Approximately 25 pets

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Cricket and Bug are two of the cats who were helped by this grant. These were two sisters whom one of our fosters saw dumped on the side of the road. Of course, she had to help them! She took them in and evaluated them. They were about 7 months old, but not fixed. Because of the grant, we were able to deworm them, vaccinate them, and get them spayed.

We were so thrilled when they got adopted together a few weeks later! They seemed to be bonded, and we had hoped that they would be adopted together.

Outta the Cage: Senior Pet Adoption Grants
What was the money or product used for?

This money was used to help cover medical care for two “unadoptable” dogs: Kira and Georgie.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Kira is a senior girl who is dog-friendly and adoptable. But as soon as people heard she’d had surgery to remove a mammary tumor, they decided to look at other dogs.

Georgie was in the shelter for 14 months with a torn ACL. Again, no one wanted a dog with medical expenses. We rescued her and had her ACL fixed, then put her in recovery boarding for eight weeks so that she could heal. This cost us over $3,000.

How many pets did this grant help?

BOTH Kira and Georgie have been adopted since their operations!!!!

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We rescued Kira, a 10-year-old pittie mix, from Downey shelter on her last day. She had been left there by her owners, who didn’t want to deal with a large mammary mass. Of course, no adopters stepped forward, and Kira was red-listed.

We rescued Kira and got her surgery: the removal of her right mammary chain. We then found a foster, Valerie (with Kira in the first and second photos), to help her recover. During that time, she saw an oncologist who didn’t see any evidence of cancer spread. But she had complications, including an antibiotic-resistant infection that was serious.

Then we found another foster, Mika, who ultimately adopted Kira. Kira is now happy with Mika in her new home, and Valerie, her first foster, recently visited Kira and Mika (third photo)!

Georgie (fourth photo) was in the shelter for 14 months with a torn ACL. No one wanted a dog with medical expenses. We rescued her and had her ACL fixed, then put her in recovery boarding for eight weeks so that she could heal.

She’s since been adopted by a great family in the Valley who already adore her (fifth and sixth photos). The feeling is mutual. Georgie (her new name is Jojo) is enjoying a healthy routine that includes a fun morning walk, rest in her crate, and playtime hunting for lizards (her absolute FAVE activity!).

Animal Rescue of the Rockies: Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

We bought beds, blankets and toys for dogs who are in foster care, awaiting their forever homes. If these dogs can be more comfortable and more happy while in foster care, we hope they can get adopted faster.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant enabled us to provide enrichment to these dogs without taking money away from medical care such as spay/neuter and vaccinations. The enrichment toys kept the dogs stimulated. The beds and blankets are comfy and soft. The dogs enjoy their stay in foster care!

How many pets did this grant help?

250

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

One of our older dogs, Bert, was provided a heated memory-foam bed so that his old bones could be comfy and warm. He really enjoyed this bed prior to his adoption. It’s possible that his smiling face enabled him to get adopted by a wonderful new family.

Boone Area Humane Society: COVID-19 Operation Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The $250 Petfinder Foundation grant funds were applied to the purchase of:
–Ten cases (24 cans each) of Purina Pro Plan Pate Wet Kitten Food, FOCUS Chicken & Liver Entrée, and
—One six-pack of canned Royal Canin Mother & Babycat Ultra-Soft Mousse in Sauce wet cat food for new kittens and nursing or pregnant mother cats

The products were purchased from Amazon.com at a total cost of $257.78.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

To date in 2020, volunteers have cared for 201 kittens in our foster-care program. This grant has been critical in providing food for many of these kittens at a time when our two annual large-crowd fundraisers cannot be held and cash donations have been extremely low as our community and donor base struggle with job loss, unemployment, and taking care of their families, neighbors, and friends as COVID has reached very high transmission rates in the state of Iowa. We are very grateful for the ability to stretch our resources as a result of these grant funds.

How many pets did this grant help?

34 kittens from newborn to adoption age

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Covi (first photo) and her siblings came to the BAHS shelter while the COVID-19 shutdown was well underway in our community. The kittens had been born on a farm, and Covi was special. Instead of hind legs, she had only two tiny stumps. But nothing stopped this girl, and she was determined to keep up with her littermates!

We are so glad that she was brought to us because she would not have survived as an outdoor cat; instead, she is a sweet success story. Her foster mom posted pictures of Covi on Facebook, and another of our foster caregivers saw the pictures and fell in love with her. When Covi came up for adoption in July, the foster caregiver who saw her photos adopted her immediately. Her new name is Mia (second photo)! Covi’s littermates have also been adopted.

Hitch (third photo) was an 8-week-old kitten who was brought to the shelter after he crawled inside a car engine in Grand Junction and rode 20 miles to Boone. The driver discovered him when she got out of her car to go work. Imagine being inside a car engine going 70 miles an hour!

Hitch is working to get healthy in his foster home and will be advertised for adoption as soon as he is ready.

Tatiana (fourth photo), a very pregnant cat, was found wandering outdoors in the city of Boone. One week after she was sent to a foster caregiver, she gave birth to six kittens. The kittens are almost ready to come up for adoption, and Tatiana will go to a very nice farm home. She is friendly but doesn’t enjoy living inside. Tatiana says it’s hip to be (ear-)tipped. The fifth photo shows Lima Bean, one of her kittens.

None of the kittens described here are posted on Petfinder at this time. Our kittens get adopted very quickly, and most have applications on them within a day of being posted on Petfinder.

Wags & Walks: COVID-19 Operation Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The Petfinder Foundation granted Wags & Walks a $750 COVID-19 Operations grant. This funding helped us to continue our operations in the face of severe revenue losses. It contributed to the foster and medical care of our rescue dogs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Because we have transitioned almost all the dogs in our care to foster homes, we have actually been able to intake a large number of dogs this year. That said, our medical and foster expenses have grown exponentially. The Petfinder Foundation helped us to care for dogs who would otherwise have been euthanized without our intervention.

How many pets did this grant help?

1.5

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Porky was bred in a backyard to fight. When he wouldn’t fight, he was dumped. He became emaciated, suffered severe pancreatitis, and had debilitating ear infections. We hospitalized him immediately. His condition was so dire, he had a 50/50 chance of survival.

We prepared ourselves for the worst, but Porky fought for his life at the emergency vet. After he showed signs of recovery, we moved him to a long-time foster home. He was their 33rd foster pup. Though his foster parents were not looking to adopt, it wasn’t long until they fell in love and decided to give Porky a forever home.

In their words, “Porky (now Porkster) brings us so much joy and makes us laugh every day!”

Fearless Kitty Rescue: COVID-19 Operation Grant
What was the money or product used for?

We used the funding we received to support our foster program going from part-time to full-time during COVID-19.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant was incredibly helpful to us because, when COVID hit, we were forced to close down our brick-and-mortar building so that we could keep our volunteers and staff safe. In March we (like everyone) had no idea what was happening; all we knew was that we had to be very cautious and very responsible. We placed the 50 kitties we had in our building into foster care; it was a challenge because our foster program only had a budget for a part-time position, and we had to increase the number of hours our foster coordinator was working in order to grow our program so we had homes for every kitty.

How many pets did this grant help?

86

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Mabel was born on March 21, 2019. Her introduction to life was not the best. She had been dumped in a Home Depot parking lot in Mesa with her two siblings. Luckily for them, a kind lady from Apache Junction found them and contacted us. They arrived at our rescue in April 2019. She lived at our rescue for about a month until a grandmother with eight grandchildren fell under her spell. She was adopted on May 29, 2019.

At this point, we all hoped this sweet little kitten had finally found her forever home. Unfortunately, her story does not end there. Almost a year to the day later, we received a phone call from her adopter stating that she could no longer care for Mabel as she (the adopter) had developed a rare blood cancer and lupus.

We have always had a policy with the rescue that, if for any reason you can no longer care for your cat, we will take the kitty back, no questions asked. So on the June 2, 2020, a scared little cat returned, not knowing why this had happened.

For a few days, she was placed into one of our habitat rooms that are set up almost like a living room in a home for observation. Unfortunately, Mabel was showing signs of reverse socialization and fear. We kept an eye on her as she continually hid under blankets and away from people. We decided that a foster situation would be the best scenario for her recovery. Because of the grant we received, we had just the right foster person who could not only take Mable, but give her the additional socialization she needed.

At the foster’s home, she lived in her own bedroom for about two weeks as she slowly came out of her shell. Then she started to show strong interest in the other cats who would constantly visit her from the other side of the closed door. She had lived a solitary, cat-free life for almost a year. It was an almost instant integration success once she met the other kitties and finally, she came out of her shell.

A week later, the foster decided to adopt her, and she became a permanent member of that family in July 2020.

A New Chance Animal Rescue: COVID-19 Operation Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Some of this grant was used towards medical care for a dog who came to us from a backyard breeder. Dorothy’s care totaled over $1,500. This grant was used to help pay for the x-rays that were needed to evaluate her orthopedic issues that had been left untreated for years. This grant was also used to help cover the cost of monthly preventatives for some of our dogs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped to subsidize some of the medical-care costs associated with dogs in our care (see above). We have been struggling with fundraising, so it was a welcome relief to have this grant to help with a few of our expenses.

How many pets did this grant help?

8

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Dorothy was rescued from a backyard breeder, where she spent the first 8 years of her life living in a rabbit hutch. She needed 13 dental extractions, and had a grade-2 heart murmur, bilateral medial patella luxation, cataracts, and bilateral hip dysplasia with moderate degenerative joint disease.

Dorothy was a matted mess when she came into our care, and she also had allergies and skin issues. Once we got her healthy, she was adopted by a wonderful woman who needed Dorothy’s love as much as Dorothy needed hers.

Chasin Tail Rescue, Inc.: COVID-19 Operation Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The $250 grant was applied to medical care for Jean, a stray dog who was underweight and had severe skin conditions. She is now at one of our North Carolina foster homes, making a complete recovery, and hopefully she will be adopted soon.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

At the time we were considering Jean, there was a significant chance we would have passed her up without this grant.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Jean was a stray with some sores or a skin condition on her hind end; she was also definitely underweight. She was not being adopted at the shelter, so Chasin Tail Rescue pulled her on Aug. 14 and she has been with a foster since. When she has completely recovered, she will be put up for adoption. When she was picked up, she had a tear in her eye, captured in one of the photos.

Humane Society of Summit County: COVID-19 Operation Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Grant support from the Petfinder Foundation was used to support our foster program, which quickly expanded to include available animals following the onset of the coronavirus pandemic.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Specifically, funding from the Petfinder Foundation provided the means to purchase essential foster-care supplies such as large crates, bedding, bowls, food, and toys to support our foster families while they temporarily cared for our animals.

How many pets did this grant help?

19

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

During the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic, our available dogs needed foster families, and our organization was lucky to have many families reach out to us willing to open their hearts and homes to an animal in need.

Ryker, a young pit-bull terrier mix, was one of our available dogs in need of a foster family. He was soon matched with a generous family, and Ryker settled in well to his new temporary home.

Things didn’t remain temporary for long though!

Ryker immediately bonded with the family’s resident senior pit-bull terrier mix, Panda, who was adopted from HSSC in 2016. With his silly and playful personality, Ryker helped to bring out the puppy hiding in Panda, and the pair became inseparable.

Ryker also won over the heart of his new dad, who, when making his initial decision to foster, insisted that the arrangement would be temporary. The two became best buds.

Ryker fit into his foster family so well that they officially adopted him!

Benld Adopt-A-Pet: COVID-19 Operation Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The grant funds were used to purchase enough vaccines to vaccinate at least 50 of our pets. All of our pets are kept up-to-date on vaccinations.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

In the past couple months, our intake numbers have not necessarily increased, as they have at many shelters, but we have taken in more animals needing immediate and follow-up medical care. The increased medical expenses have greatly impacted our budget. The Petfinder Foundation grant enabled us to ensure that we had the needed vaccines on hand so that pets at the shelter stayed up-to-date on vaccinations and all pets adopted were up-to-date on vaccinations.

How many pets did this grant help?

50

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Lou Anne (first photo) is a kitten who was brought to the shelter in August. Below is part of the story we posted about Lou Anne on Facebook. We did the vaccinations for Lou Anne as needed, and she received emergency care and surgery at vet clinics in Springfield.

Friday afternoon, the shelter office manager did not get to go home as planned. Instead, she drove an injured kitten towards Springfield. She was met partway by our acting shelter director, who then took the kitten to the Animal Emergency Clinic in Springfield, IL.

The kitten had been brought to the Benld shelter that afternoon. She had been found in the middle of a road by Lake Lou Yaeger in Litchfield. A lady stopped to check and move what she thought was a dead kitten. She found two kittens; one was deceased and the second was alive, but severely injured. She wrapped up the injured kitten and brought it to the shelter looking for help.

We decided that bringing the kitten to Springfield was the only option, as the local animal hospitals were closing for the night. The kitten’s mouth was bleeding, her jaw appeared broken, and a back leg was shattered with bone exposed.

They could not hear her lung sounds at the shelter because the kitten would not stop purring. We had to take a chance that the doctors at the Animal Emergency Clinic could help her or, if not, to at least help her pass away free of pain and fear.

Little kitten Lou Anne spent the weekend at the emergency clinic on antibiotics and fluids. She was even able to eat a little. Monday morning, Lou Anne will go to Coble Animal Hospital. The plan is to amputate her shattered leg and stabilize her jaw.

Lou Anne was an excellent patient! She was sweet to everyone and healed quickly. She was just recently adopted by a friend of the shelter, who several years ago adopted a dog from us named Ruby. Ruby had also been in horrible shape (emaciated — she’d been purposely starved by her owner) when she arrived at the shelter. Ruby and Lou Anne are the best of friends now (second photo) and Lou Anne races around the house like a mad kitten!

Cinnamon (third photo) came to the shelter very pregnant! She soon had 10 pups at her foster home. They are almost ready for adoption.

Callie (fourth photo) was also brought to the shelter pregnant. Her owners had taken her to the vet to be spayed, but when they learned that she was pregnant they did not spay her and the vet contacted us to ask if we would be able to take her. Callie and her kittens will also be ready for adoption soon. Callie is such a good mom!