Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

Rebel Rescue, Inc.: Dogs Playing for Life Mentorship Grant (Invitation Only)
What was the money or product used for?

Part of the grant money paid my tuition to attend a Dog’s Playing for Life Mentorship Program. The money also paid for supplies so that we could build a few agility-type play items for the yard.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Having play yard equipment is keeping the rescue dogs more engaged and curious. We see this bring out more happiness and have seen dogs who had been timid come out of their shells to play more. This has made them calmer and more interested in play.

How many pets did this grant help?

We have 52 dogs right now and the play items help them all.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Pepper (first photo) has been passed over for adoption because of his super-charged energy and his tendency to play in a dominant way. Now that he is using toys and obstacles, he is being challenged more and appears to be having a MUCH better time! He is now playing in groups and not making the other dogs mad. Meet Pepper here.

In the second photo you will see Cowboy and Jude. These two love digging in rocks and burying each other. It is hilarious! Both are dogs who didn’t like other dogs and were getting passed over for adoption. With structured introductions and play, they built confidence and eventually became friends and loved to play with the others.

If you look in the background of the third photo, you can see the A-frame and the hoop jump we built. In the fourth photo, you can see the catwalk in the background.

Today, Jude and Cowboy are adopted. Pepper is still waiting for his family to find him. He is still full of energy, so we have to wait for a family that plays together. We tell him the right family will come for him one day.

Shelbyville-Bedford County Humane Association: Petfinder Adoption Options in Action Grant (Invitation Only)
What was the money or product used for?

Vaccines and microchips

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It was extremely helpful in preventing the introduction and spread of communicable cat and dog diseases in our no-kill shelter.

How many pets did this grant help?

$450, or about 50% of the money, has been spent on 20 animals who were brought into or residing in the shelter since Sept. 1, 2018. Seven of these new animals have been adopted in September and October; the cost that includes animals helped in November will be available on Dec. 7, 2018.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

The Happy Tale of Tater and Tot: Two tiny, tiny black kittens, barely a month old, were rescued four years ago by a Shelbyville-Bedford County Humane Association (SBCHA) volunteer and brought to our no-kill shelter. But because they were ill and suffering from upper-respiratory disease, their little eyes all crusty and runny with mucous, they could not be kept in the shelter and were housed and treated by a kindly foster mom until they were better. Later they contracted ringworm and had to be isolated and treated at the veterinarian for a month. Despite their rough start, the kittens exhibited gentle and loving personalities, putting up with all those treatments, meds and baths.

Over time, Tater and Tot — not the first choice of most adopters because of their black color — grew into adult cats, spending their time playing with their cat buddies at the shelter in the group cat room, a large living room-sized space with toys and a cat patio where they could lie in the sun. SBCHA Volunteers would come to groom everyone, and Tater and Tot were the most loving kitties who stole volunteers’ hearts, but were left behind when the adopters came for other, more colorful kitties.
Of course, Tater and Tot were kept up on their annual shots to maintain their health, as SBCHA is committed to keeping all animals in the shelter healthy and happy, no matter how long they are here.

Finally, just recently, Tater and Tot where the first choice of a lady who specifically wanted a black kitty. She chose Tot, but when she found out Tater and Tot were siblings, she did not want to separate them. “Two will just be more to love,” she said.

All the volunteers cheered on the big day when Tater and Tot went to their new home. And now Tater and Tot are luxuriating in a happy forever home, with plenty of toys, a magnificent cat tree, yummy treats and the caring arms of their new Mom. “Just more to love,” she murmurs tenderly, enveloping them in her arms, “just more to love.”

Tater and Tot are two of the animals helped with annual shots by the Petfinder Foundation Adoption Options in Action grant awarded in September 2018.

PAWS Atlanta, Inc.: Senior Pet Adoption Grants
What was the money or product used for?

Grant funding from the Petfinder Foundation will help us provide the following for Spirit: 1) waiving Spirit’s $150 adoption fee; 2) funding one year of Apoquel daily medication, which is $1.75/each = $638.75/year; and 3) funding one year of annual routine urine- and blood-checks at $200/year.

Unfortunately, Spirit has not been adopted yet. Since coming to us in 2015, Spirit has had extensive medical bills due to her chronic conditions. She suffers from atopy and food allergy which is managed with z/d ultra hypoallergenic diet and Apoquel daily medication. We also have to treat frequent secondary skin and ear infections.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We know that once Spirit is adopted, she will be greatly helped by this grant. Spirit’s photo and story, since we received the grant, have been highlighted repeatedly on social media, including Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. She has also been highlighted in our email blasts and is posted on Petfinder.com.

How many pets did this grant help?

It will help one pet, Spirit, when she gets adopted.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Spirit has not been adopted yet. She is such a sweet and gentle girl, but her age (between 8 and 10 years old) and medical issues have made it very difficult for her to find a new home. We did have two people reach out to us about adopting, but they have cats at home, and Spirit could not go into a home with cats. We are extremely fortunate that she is in a loving foster home, but she does have to stay with us at the shelter periodically when her foster mom goes out of town. We will continue our outreach efforts to find Spirit a permanent home, and the funds generously donated by the Petfinder Foundation will be used for the purposes outlined in the grant. We cannot thank the Petfinder Foundation enough for helping us in this effort. We are extremely grateful! Meet Spirit.

Buddy Up Animal Society: KONG Toy Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Kongs for our dogs in foster homes while they received proper and necessary medical care and training to prepare them for adoption

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant was very helpful to our organization, as we go through many Kongs to keep our foster pups busy and happy, especially during quiet recovery time for several of our heartworm-positive dogs who had to go through injection treatments. So many were on strict crate rest for a period of several months during this process. Kongs are a huge help with keeping their brains busy and happy!

How many pets did this grant help?

Approximately 7

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Remco, a.k.a. Remi, was one of my favorite foster dogs. He is a VERY energetic and high-maintenance dog. When he first came to my home, we struggled with some separation anxiety and keeping his brain and body busy with proper exercise and training. He’s a sweet, goofy, compact, energetic guy with a huge personality, and he always kept me on my toes. He REALLY enjoyed snuggling up next to me and enjoying a frozen Kong. I used Kongs to help with crate-training him as well and working through his separation anxiety, with which we made great progress working through together to prepare him for his forever family.

Remi came from an overcrowded shelter in Florida after Hurricane Irma left many owner-surrendered dogs vulnerable to euthanasia, as the shelters were overflowing with displaced pets. He was with my husband and me for about six months while we worked on his basic manners. Remco was adopted in May of this year and lives happily with his parents at a lake house. He even enjoys boat rides! I miss him very much, but am so grateful we were able to provide him with the life and family he so deserves, and this KONG product grant helped make that possible!

Pits R Us All Breed Rescue & Adoptions: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The grant funds were used for Blackbeard’s medical bills.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We were able to give Blackbeard a chance to recover from a severe eye infection. Without the funds, we would not have been able to try every option available.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Blackbeard came to us from a shelter in the Bay Area. They made no mention of injury or illness. We were not prepared for what we saw when he arrived: His right eye looked like scrambled eggs, literally. He came to us on Sept. 21, 2018, and we immediately took him to Medical Center for Birds. He had a serious e. coli and bacterial infection in the eye socket. It has to be removed, flushed and he needed to be on antibiotics and under vet care until the eye socket was free of infection and could be stitched shut.

He was scheduled to go back to have the eye socket closed, but unexpectedly passed away the night before. We are all devastated.

Adopt-A-Dog, Inc: Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The Orivis Animal Care Grant covered the cost of 62 different enrichment items.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

These enrichment items help keep our dogs physically and mentally healthy during their stay with us.

How many pets did this grant help?

35

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Being in a kennel environment is unnatural for any dog, but especially for one like Harley (first photo). Harley prefers to not be around other dogs (or cats!), so the kennel is particularly stressful for her. We originally picked Harley up at a high-volume shelter in Ohio, where she had been dumped a few months earlier by a local farmer. We had Harley for a short amount of time before she was adopted to a lovely family. This family had her for several months before admitting that her behaviors were just too much for them to handle. Harley is now in our behavior-training program and ready to go to a family willing to learn all the skills she knows now. Our enrichment program is vital to keeping Harley and our other dogs happy, healthy, and busy during their stay. Meet Harley.

Friends For Life: Senior Pet Adoption Grants
What was the money or product used for?

This grant helped provide the daily medical care for one of our senior adoptable cats, Rocky. She had chronic diarrhea, occasional vomiting, hyperthyroidism and spinal inflammation. Rocky was on a variety of different medications for her thyroid function and pain management, as well as a special protein diet and daily subcutaneous fluids.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Because of this grant, we are able to take in senior animals to be placed in their forever homes. Too often, senior animals are euthanized in traditional shelters because the shelters are not able to provide the medications or dedicated time to rehabilitate this kind of pet. At Friends For Life, we don’t believe that age is automatically a death sentence, and because of the support of the Petfinder Foundation, we are able to offer this kind of treatment for a second chance at life.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Rocky was a one-of-a kind cat. She was a survivor of Hurricane Harvey in Houston. During her time living at the our shelter, she fully asserted herself as a member of our family. She loved the company of guests, as long as they stayed to pet her, because “drive-by petting” stressed her out. On October 24, Rocky had some bloody diarrhea, pale gums, more stumbling than usual, was drooling and had apparent abdominal discomfort. Our on-staff licensed veterinary technician was concerned that she was bleeding internally and might not make it through the night. We rushed her to the emergency room, where the veterinarian had the same assessment. Rocky was euthanized that evening. She was alongside two of our staff and her caretakers. Rocky’s memory lives on in our memorial garden (fourth photo), where we are able to honor all of the animals who have left us.

Ramapo-Bergen Animal Refuge, Inc.: Senior Pet Adoption Grants
What was the money or product used for?

Foster and Santino are a bonded pair of seniors with special medical needs who lost their home when their owner passed away. The funds requested were used for Foster and Santino’s medical expenses in their foster-to-adopt home. They were placed as a supported-senior adoption, in which we assist with medical costs as the pet transitions to ease the burden on the adoptive family and make them more likely to find a home.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Foster and Santino require regular rechecks and bloodwork at our specialty vet, where we received a 50% discount on care. Both dogs are on D/D prescription diet for allergies. Santino is on gabapentin for seizures. Foster is on melatonin, omeprazole, Pprednisone, Atopica and mycophenolate for his ITP [a bleeding disorder caused by a low platelet count]. Funding assisted with their ongoing medical care as a supported-senior adoption, where we will assist the adopter with medical costs to ease some of the financial burden as they transition into a new home. Taking on one senior with medical concerns is commendable, but taking on two requires an incredible and committed home.

How many pets did this grant help?

2

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Foster and Santino are a bonded pair of senior cocker spaniels. Our local veterinary hospital referred them to us because of their special needs. They have always lived together. Their owner recently passed away, and they are confused without her, but they have each other to find comfort in. They have received specialized medical care and been well cared-for, and now they have no one. Foster has ITP (an autoimmune blood disorder in which he doesn’t produce enough platelets and has clotting issues), so he is on immunosuppressive drugs and an allergy diet. Santino is epileptic and on medication as well as an allergy diet. They are a sweet, senior bonded pair. Not only is it a challenge to place them because they are seniors, but they both have special medical needs and are on a special diet, which is costly. They are in a foster-with-intent-to-adopt home together thanks to the Petfinder Foundation.

The Haley Graves Foundation: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Winni was brought to a local shelter suffering from a gunshot wound she suffered when she wandered on to someone’s property. Winni has had three surgeries.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

See below.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We received a call from a rural shelter that a Lab mix had been shot at close range and needed immediate veterinary care and rescue. Winni was 7 months old at the time and we immediately brought her in to our rescue. She had been shot in the shoulder, the bullet barely missing her scapula. She had, as we later found out, been lured onto the property by being fed. The local animal control officer refused to prosecute because in North Carolina you can shoot a dog for being on your property. However, it is a crime to lure a dog with the intent of wounding it, but even with a witness, they still refused to prosecute.

Upon closer examination of Winni, we discovered that she had been shot in the other leg approximately six weeks earlier and survived despite a lack of treatment.

We immediately began care for Winni and reached out to the Petfinder Foundation for an Emergency Medical Grant. We were ecstatic when we received word that it had been granted.

Winni went through three surgeries and still lives with shrapnel in her body. Removing it would have caused more damage. Winni had a loving and dedicated vet staff that took care of her for the six weeks she was hospitalized. Her loving vet tech, Crystal, bonded with Winni and adopted her. Winni went from a living nightmare to being a loved and adored puppy with the help of the Petfinder Foundation grant.

There are no words to thank you for your generosity!

It Takes A Village Canine Rescue: Petfinder Adoption Options in Action Grant (Invitation Only)
What was the money or product used for?

We used the money to pay our vet bills.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We are a no-kill rescue so we sometimes face extraordinary vet bills helping animals that no one else will help. The grants helped with our vet bills, which average about $100,000 each year.

How many pets did this grant help?

20

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Boone is one of the animals that the grant helped. He was rescued as a stray and was in deplorable condition. Boone had overgrown nails, was thin and had significant skin issues. He is currently still with us as he continues to get healthy. We expect that he will be ready for adoption in the near future.