Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

Fayette County Animal Rescue: P.L.A.Y. Pet Beds
What was the money or product used for?

The beds were used for the rescues currently inside our shelter building.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The beds received allowed us to get our rescues off the cold concrete floor while they were inside our facility waiting on their forever homes. We also were able to use them within our crates at adoption events so the dogs were comfortable and it helped them show up better against our black crates.

How many pets did this grant help?

Best guess is 100 as we reuse the beds until someone chews them up 🙂

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We were able to use the beds within our shelter and also at adoption events. We don’t have a specific story related to this wonderful donation of dog beds as we were able to use them with multiple dogs. Easy to wash and reuse. Many thanks!

Central Oklahoma Humane Society: Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

This grant was used for general operating expenses within our adoption program.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant assisted our organization in purchasing food for animals in our adoption program while in our care.

How many pets did this grant help?

The grant provided food for 303 animals within our adoption program.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Mouse was surrendered to the Central Oklahoma Humane Society as a 5-week-old puppy, weighing less than a pound — the owner was unable to provide enough time and care. A foster home was found and Mouse stayed with them for several weeks until she was old enough to be spayed and adopted. The grant generously provided the funding needed to cover the cost of food for Mouse and others like her while they were in our care.

Wood County Humane Society: Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The Orvis Animal Care Grant monies allowed us to provide more hours for our dog trainer, Scott Beard, to work with the dogs we house in our shelter, and also allowed for several home visits to dogs adopted from our shelter.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The Wood County Humane Society employs a part-time dog trainer to work with all dogs that enter the shelter, as well as after they are adopted, in an effort to keep them in their forever homes if any issues arise post-adoption. Being awarded this grant allowed us to provide more hours for our dog trainer to work more with our dogs, to do home visits for some of our dogs (post-adoption), and to train our volunteers how to handle the dogs in our care.

How many pets did this grant help?

All dogs entering and leaving our shelter between December 2014 and February 2015 (33).

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

The Orvis Animal Care Grant helped 33 dogs between December 2014 and February 2015. It is hard to highlight specific dogs helped during this period, because they were all helped! Of the 33 dogs we took in during this period, 18 have since found their forever homes. Our dog trainer, Scott Beard, works with all dogs entering our shelter, and also does a post-adoption follow-up to make sure the dogs and adopters are adjusting well after adoption. When dogs arrive at our shelter, they are assessed to see what they know and what they need work on. Scott then works closely with the staff and volunteers so they are able to continue training during all interactions with the dogs.

Humane Society of Lincoln County (HSLC): Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The funding of $1,000 was used to spay/neuter shelter cats and dogs to make them more adoptable and facilitate their adoption.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Animals that are spayed or neutered give potential adopters an added incentive to select them over those that are still intact. Adopters don’t have to wait for surgery appointments or worry about their pet recovering from surgery. The HSLC has already taken care of that.

How many pets did this grant help?

Grant funding allowed the HSLC to spay eight female dogs, eight female cats, four male dogs and two male cats. It was used to sterilize a total of 22 shelter animals.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Unless they’re a cute, bubbly puppy or a desirable purebred, many shelter dogs get passed over without a second glance. That was the case with Abbott and Costello, two adult brothers found as strays. These big (Pyrenees mix?) boys came into the shelter shy and uncertain, but once they were cleaned up, neutered and given regular meals, they relaxed in their new digs. They were just two friendly guys who got along with everyone – people and other dogs. But no one noticed how cool they were. Even being featured in the EVT Shelter Voice got no interest.

So it was decided to take them to an off-site adoption event at a PetSmart store. Just before their trip, however, Costello came down with an infected toe that had to be amputated, so he was left behind. Abbott went and, not surprisingly, attracted a lot of attention, since he is one cool dude. Mr. Barber was particularly smitten. He and his wife walked Abbott around inside and outside the store before finally deciding to adopt him. Mr. Barber was interested to learn that Abbott had a brother who was also up for adoption and expressed an interest in seeing him if Abbott worked out.

Several weeks later, HSLC volunteers took several dogs, including Costello, back to PetSmart. Mr. and Mrs. Barber and Abbott (now Dakota) met them. It was a happy reunion for the two brothers. And, you guessed it, they are both now part of the Barber family.

According to Mr. and Mrs. Barber, Dakota and (now) Kennedy love to go for walks — especially to the bark park. It’s hard to tell which they enjoy more — people or the other dogs. They get along with everyone. They love watching squirrels, birds, and other animals. The Barbers are installing fencing so Dakota and Kennedy can have the freedom of their own yard.

If Dakota and Kennedy have a problem, the Barbers say, it is their occasional bouts of youthful exuberance. Being only a year or so old, they still need some training and discipline, but Mr. Barber feels that will come with time. Even though they have different and distinct personalities, they watch out for each other just like brothers they are.

It just goes to show that getting animals away from the shelter where people can see their unique personalities and maybe envision them in their own homes really helps. It also helps that the HSLC has the resources to spay and neuter these animals so they can go to off-site adoption events and, hopefully, directly into a new home. It worked for two brothers, didn’t it?

Helping Hand Pet Rescue of West Virginia : A Shot at Life Vaccination Grant
What was the money or product used for?

We received 100 dog vaccines.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We were able to help all the dogs currently in our care.

How many pets did this grant help?

100

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We currently have a dog named Leo who came into our rescue with a broken leg. We were able to administer the vaccine before his surgery, helping save some on the vet bill. Later, after he was healed, he was able to find his forever home. The new adoptive parents were very impressed that he was in such a healthy condition and up-to-date on all vaccines.

Pitter Patter Animal Rescue Inc: Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The money from this grant was used for vet care — emergency vet care that was needed in order to save their lives. This money helped with medical care expenses, surgical procedures, medications, treatment, and ICU.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped the organization and all the pets in the care of the rescue by helping with these expensive vet bills. This grant is so appreciated.

How many pets did this grant help?

Four-plus

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Paisley (first photo) is a little black Lab who was dumped in the emergency room with slashes all over her little body. She was cut up like a cucumber and had lost a lot of blood. She had a big skull fracture. She needed emergency surgery to save her. Sparticus (second photo) is a shepherd mix who came to the rescue from death row with foreign items in his stomach. He was a little bag of bones. He needed to have the items in his stomach pass or be removed. He needed TLC to get some weight on and be a healthy, bouncy baby boy. Ben and Jerry (third photo) are two pit bull pups who, at only hours old, needed to be in the intensive care unit. The owner of a momma dog let her suffer and did not get vet care when a baby got stuck in her birth canal. Momma and four other babies did not make it, but Ben and Jerry received emergency vet care, which included the ICU. (Jerry is in the fourth photo.) We are happy and honored to report that all these furbabies are happy, healthy, alive and well.

UPDATE: Paisley has been adopted!

Adopt Sparticus: https://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/30287569/
Adopt Ben and Jerry: https://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/31232861/

Halfway Home Rescue, Inc.: Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The generous grant we received was used to help save the lives of three heartworm-positive dogs rescued from North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia. Treatment to test and treat these boys totaled more than $1,500. Thanks to this generous contribution, we were able to provide treatment and save their lives.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped ease the burden of raising funds to provide heartworm treatment to Moe, Merlin, and Sammy.

How many pets did this grant help?

Three heartworm-positive dogs

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Moe (first photo) was rescued from living his life in a cage in a rural North Carolina neighborhood. He was being relentlessly teased by people living there. He was emaciated and was rescued in the middle of the night by Animal Control and local rescuers. Merlin (second photo) came to our shelter from [an open-admission] South Carolina shelter where he was sentenced to die because his time was up. He tested heartworm-positive and that shelter euthanizes all heartworm-positive animals. We were asked to take him to spare his life. Sammy (third photo) came to our shelter as a stray in Griffin, Ga. He was rescued by a friend of our shelter and was suffering from an E-coli infection as well as heartworm.

Thanks to your generosity, we were able to seek proper heartworm treatment for all three boys. We are eternally grateful.

Arizona Humane Society: Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

This generous Orvis Grant of $1,000 was used to support general operating for our dog adoption programs. AHS found 13,312 forever homes for animals last year and placed a total of 17,831 through adoption and alternative placement programs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

As a modern open-intake facility, we accept owner-surrendered animals, as well as the sick, injured, abused and abandoned homeless pets who have nowhere else to turn and need our care and support. While it costs AHS an average of $422 to care for each pet until he or she finds a home, some of our homeless pets are in our care longer, resulting in an increased cost of care incurred by AHS to ensure each pet stays happy and healthy while awaiting their loving home. Shelter Buddies is a program at our Campus for Compassion, in which our adoption counselors advocate for animals in the shelter whose stories or personalities have made an impression. The Hopeful Heart program helps AHS showcase animals who might need a little extra attention to help them find a loving home. Through the support of this Orvis Grant, we were able to offset the financial impact for some of the pets that remain in our care for an extended period of time.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant was used to support our general operating for our dog adoptions and our Shelter Buddies and Hopeful Heart programs, which impacted numerous homeless dogs awaiting loving homes.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

There is one story in particular that showcases the impact of our lifesaving dog-adoption programs and the impact of this grant. Let me introduce you to our furry friend, Brownie (first photo). On Jan. 16, 2015, Maricopa Animal and Rabies Control advised the Phoenix Police Department and the Arizona Humane Society that, in response to complaints from witnesses, they had recovered a brown pit bull dog from a couch in front of a Phoenix residence (second photo). Phoenix police began an investigation into possible animal cruelty/neglect and were able to determine that the owner of the pet had moved out of the home on Wednesday, Jan. 14, and had possibly left the dog behind.

Police first interviewed neighbors of the owner and, on Jan. 17, were able to contact the 33-year-old owner via telephone. The owner indicated that he was upset because he had returned to the property later on the day he had moved and dog was not there. Officers advised the owner that the dog had been placed with the Arizona Humane Society and a pet seizure notice, giving the owner 10 days to request a hearing to get his pet back, had been left on the garage door.

After nearly a month of Brownie being in AHS’s care, the owner had made no claim for the pet and this investigation was sent to the City Attorney’s Office for charging/review. At that time, Brownie was put up for adoption through AHS and we are proud to say that as of Feb. 13, 2015, Brownie has found his new home — he even has a new canine friend (third photo).

Because of generous supporters like Petfinder Foundation, the lifesaving work being done by AHS is made possible to serve more homeless pets like Brownie each and every day.

Happy Dog Adoption: Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

It was used to save an owner-surrendered pregnant Yorkie in distress.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It saved the life of a distressed, pregnant Yorkie and we were able to find her a great home.

How many pets did this grant help?

So far, one, but we now hope it will help five or six!

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We took in an owner surrender on a weekend — a Yorkie brought to us as a medical emergency, pregnant and in distress. She needed a C-section and the family couldn’t afford it. They surrendered her, and after two hours in emergency surgery, the vet removed five dead puppies, one of which had turned toxic. In addition, her bladder and bowel had adhered to her uterus. She wouldn’t have made it through the night without the surgery. We then found her a wonderful home. The first photo is the Yorkie pregnant and dying; the second is her after surgery.

We also took in an abandoned schnauzer-mix female who had been attacked by a Rhodesian ridgeback and was in very neglected condition. We still have her because she needed dental work that just got done on the Feb. 11. The third is Katy before her haircut; the fourth shows the wounds we discovered after we cut off all the matted hair; and the last one is her “after,” all healed now.

Houndhaven, Inc.: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

The money was used to help our darling Newman fight heartworms.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The donation helped us treat for heartworms. It paid for nearly half the cost, allowing us to focus on other medical issues Newman was facing.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Houndhaven went to look at dogs at Animal Control and we met Newman, who was scheduled for euthanasia. The helper said it was a mistake that he was even in the adoptables building and couldn’t explain how he got there. We believe that God placed him there for us to see because this sweetheart did not deserve to die. He had been seized from his owner because a neighbor reported that they were starving him to death. We agree, as this poor boy was down to 48 pounds when we got him. He was also missing a lot of hair and very itchy with mange and had heartworms. After some healing and lots of TLC, Newman became the new man we promised him he would become.

Newman finally found a home where he can have all the rubber chickens he wants! He is the only dog, and the cats couldn’t care less about sharing his toys! Mom said Newman may need to put squeaky toys away before bedtime so that she and the cats can get some sleep, but other than that he will get to enjoy them to his heart’s content. Newman will also get to go for walks around the community with his new mom and get to go to the woodshop where she makes projects. Apparently there are a lot of dog-loving guys at the woodshop who will get a kick out of Newman, and Newman will get to hang out with the guys. All in all, it sounds like Newman has finally found the perfect home! Better late than never, Newmie!!