Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

Pet Helpers, Inc: Cat Chow Building Better Lives
What was the money or product used for?

To provide free cat and kitten adoptions

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Gave an added incentive to people to adopt a fully vetted pet at no cost

How many pets did this grant help?

20

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Ace (first photo) came to Pet Helpers as a small kitten with his littermates. They had multiple ongoing health issues which made it necessary to keep them a little longer, but the family got a healthy pet and Ace got a great home! Hillary (second photo) was adopted by a wonderful, loving family after coming to Pet Helpers sick and emaciated. Once she was healthy enough, we spayed her so she could join her new family. Mia (third photo) came to Pet Helpers two years ago as a semi-feral mom with a litter of kittens. Her kittens found homes immediately, but it took a lot of work to make Mia social and adoptable. Finally, two years later, she found her person.

Animal Protective Association of Missouri: Pet Transfer Program
What was the money or product used for?

Pet Transfer Program

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant paid for medication, supplies, utilities and salaries for the animals in the APA’s Pet Transfer Program.

How many pets did this grant help?

76 dogs were brought in through this program in February

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Tony the Foxhound mix was transferred to the APA Adoption Center by our humane friends in Texas County, Missouri. This 5-year-old American Foxhound mix had clearly spent his life outdoors as a hunting dog. He had a slit in one of his ears that was likely from ear notching, a way some hunters identify dogs in their own pack.

Tony wasn’t exactly what you could consider “well-mannered.” If he smelled something interesting, nothing kept him from standing on his long back legs to go check it out. He simply followed his whims (and hound nose) wherever they took him, even if it meant knocking over a coffee maker with a full pot of coffee in it! He didn’t mean harm by his mischievous behavior; he just didn’t know how to behave indoors.

We thought that rather than try to force Tony to acclimate so quickly, we would give him some transition time to get used to being indoors. The APA has large visiting rooms in its front lobby, which are encased in glass and look out onto the traffic on the road and in the parking lot. Tony spent a lot of time in there just watching people go by and being close to the outdoors again. One day not too long after we began putting Tony in the visiting room, a family walked by that doggy in the window and saw a special pup who needed guidance but had plenty of love and affection to share. They adopted Tony!

Now this former hunting dog is learning the ins and outs of home life with an excellent family who decided it wasn’t too late to teach an adult dog new tricks.

Katz 4 Keeps, Inc.: Cat Chow Building Better Lives
What was the money or product used for?

Free or reduced-fee adoptions.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We screen our applicants well and visitors always feel comfortable when visiting our facility. We used the grant in several areas: (1) To suggest adopting two kittens versus one, and had success with wonderful families; (2) We had visitors we felt comfortable suggesting adopt an adult cat as their new family member, and (3) In a situation where we felt the reduced fee was a compliment to the individual or family for adopting an abandoned, unwanted, but “worthy” feline. In all cases, we mentioned the grant only after we were certain they were going to adopt, as we didn’t want the “no fee or reduced fee” to be the reason for adopting. The adoptive families were thrilled to learn they had been “chosen” as recipients of the grant’s benefit. The grant was a plus in sibling/littermate adoptions and, most importantly, adoptions of our adult cats.

How many pets did this grant help?

Fourteen (15 including Art, who was adopted with a littermate; the adopting family paid his fee)

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

GeGe (now Gigi) was the best. GeGe and her mother and twp siblings were surrendered to K4K when their drug-dependent owner lost her home and could no longer keep them. GeGe’s quiet and aloof personality may have been the reason she wasn’t adopted sooner. She was active, as our cats have out-of-cage play twice daily, but just didn’t “click” with that “special person” — until Jodi and her three children visited. One of our teenage socializers had suggested that Jodi “focus” on GeGe, which she and her family did … and they loved her! It was very exciting to all volunteers working that weekend. GeGe is doing very well in her new home with her wonderful, loving (and patient) new family. We miss her, but are thrilled for her. Our mission is complete relative to GeGe and others who benefited from this grant. GeGe was born Feb. 23, 2006, and joined Katz 4 Keeps Jan. 27, 2012.

Heartland Humane Society: Cat Chow Building Better Lives
What was the money or product used for?

This grant is currently being used for subsidized cat adoptions through our Seniors for Seniors adoption program. Cats are offered to senior people (aged 60+) with a waived adoption fee.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant has helped place adult and senior cats (which generally have the longest length of stay) in appropriate homes which has, in turn, helped to ease shelter density. Adult and senior cats finding placement more quickly helps them to avoid increasing stress and exposure to pathogens that accompanies a longer shelter stay.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant subsidizes 20 cat adoptions. We have had 14 senior cat adoptions so far this year.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Hey Girl! is a spayed female tuxedo cat who was found in Luckiamute State Park in Albany, OR, and brought to the shelter by our county Animal Control Officer. The officer confirmed she was abandoned there, so shelter staff treated her parasites and caught her up on vaccinations and made her available for adoption. Steven Baggerly, of nearby Alsea, OR, saw Hey Girl! on our website and came in to meet her and take a look at all of our cats. He went from room to room, meeting the available cats, but when he took Hey Girl! out, it was love at first sight!

Upon inquiring about adopting her, Steven was pleasantly surprised to find that he could take her home for free through our Cat Chow Building Better Lives Seniors for Seniors program. He was so smitten with his new kitten that he allowed us to take a photo before taking her home.

The Bella Foundation SPCA: Cat Chow Building Better Lives
What was the money or product used for?

The funds were used to reduce cat-adoption fees during the month of January.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Thank you so much for the opportunity to receive this grant. Our organization works with a foster-based program and uses PetSmart stores for our cat adoptions. We are surrounded by several local shelters and one bigger rescue group who are always doing free cat adoptions, which puts our cats in a position to not get adopted. We use local partner vets who give us great deals on having our cats altered, vaccinated, tested for FIV/feline leukemia, dewormed, and microcchipped, but to recoup the cost and pay them we have to place our cat adoptions at $75. For the month of January, due to your grant, we were able to adopt out 20 cats at $25 instead of $75, and this was such a blessing. I have attached some “Welcome home” pictures of some of the cats that we adopted out in January with your grant!

How many pets did this grant help?

20

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We had one cat by the name of Maize who was with us for over six months at a $75 adoption fee, and when we marked her adoption fee down to $25, she was adopted within the week.

Adopt a Golden Atlanta: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

100% of all donations we receive each quarter from generous supporters through the Petfinder Foundation’s Sponsor A Pet program go directly toward the medical expenses of our rescues. AGA does not have a facility. Instead, we rely on generous donors, our 250+ volunteers, and our dedicated fosters to lovingly care for each rescue and ensure it receives all of its needed medical care prior to adoption.

Petfinder Foundation donations such as those received in 2014 were most likely allocated toward funds that pay for AGA’s intake wellness exam given to every rescue brought into our care. This exam includes all vaccinations, a thorough assessment by AGA partner veterinarians of the rescue’s physical health, a fecal exam, a heartworm diagnostic test, medicated baths and grooming, flea and tick medication, and microchipping. Each rescue is different; during this intake exam, our vets may determine that a rescue requires x-rays, to be spayed or neutered, some form of surgery, urgent care, pain or other medications, grooming, or ongoing observation for a period of time.

We are grateful to the Petfinder Foundation and its donors for their continued support, generosity, and kindness.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Monies received from the Foundation are allocated directly to the veterinary care required by each rescue taken in at AGA. These funds help us ensure our golden and golden-mix rescues are in their best health prior to adoption.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant will have paid for half of a wellness exam. In 2013, we received just over $200, so these funds would have covered the wellness exams of four (4) new rescues.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Corbin was found in May 2014 as a stray in Cobb County, GA, without any identification. He was vaccinated and neutered at the county Animal Control and then transported back to Atlanta by AGA. Corbin is a small Golden mix and has since been adopted (in February 2015). He was underweight at 35 lbs. and weighed just over 40 lbs. when adopted.

According to Corbin’s Wellness Intake Exam at VCA Braelinn Village Animal Hospital in Atlanta: Heartworm test results were positive but his treatment was deferred until after leg surgery. He completed his treatment and was declared heartworm-negative at the end of September. He fecal-tested positive for hookworms and he was de-wormed immediately. He had an old leg fracture causing lameness. On May 31, Corbin was operated on to repair and reset his poorly healed right back femur. He had a fractured left lower canine tooth which needed extraction, and moderate tartar. This extraction took place in a separate procedure under general anesthesia because his leg operation was too prolonged and involved to add in another procedure.

The Rescued Dog: Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Operational expenses: vet fees

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We were able to spay/neuter four dogs, and provide acute care for a postpartum female requiring subcutaneous fluids and testing to rule out parvo.

How many pets did this grant help?

Five

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We saved Roscoe from San Bernardino City Animal Control on Dec. 16, 2014. He was confiscated by Animal Control because the person he was left in the care of for dog sitting was arrested. Turns out that the dog sitter was the brother of his owner but the owner never came to claim him. We pulled him on his review date. When we got him out, it was clear that he couldn’t breathe well, so we took him directly to the vet, where he was diagnosed with pneumonia and we started daily nebulizers for seven days and antibiotics. After that cleared up, he was neutered and ready for adoption. He was adopted to a lovely couple on Jan. 13, 2015 and they adore him!

Jackson Madison County Humane Society: Cat Chow Building Better Lives
What was the money or product used for?

We used this grant to lower the adoption fees of the felines from $80 to $60 and, in some rare cases, to $40.

The felines who were adopted were fully vetted before adoption. They were all tested for FELV/FIV, received the required number of vaccines, their rabies vaccine and were all spayed or neutered.

The response we got from the adopters was fantastic. We really didn’t have a problem getting a picture taken here at the shelter of the feline with their new family (if they were adopted from here) or even sending us one or two if they were adopted from the cat adoption center out at PetSmart. Unfortunately, we didn’t get a picture of every cat adopted, but we tried.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Without this grant, we would not have been able to adopt out all of our cats (but three) that were ready for adoption. Some of them would still be sitting here at the shelter waiting for their homes. And, as long as we have some waiting for their homes, we are not able to help any more until we have openings, so this grant was a godsend to us at JMCHS.

How many pets did this grant help?

45 felines

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We had an adopter by the name of Michael, a college student (first photo). He saw a cat, Cleopatra, that was posted on our website and fell in love with her. Unfortunately, he lived in Knoxville, TN, and we are located in Jackson, TN — a four-and-a-half-hour drive, one way. He sent his mom up to check Cleopatra out and see what she thought of her. Needless to say, she fell in love with her too. Mom and Grandma picked Cleopatra up and drove the four and a half hours to deliver Cleopatra to her new dad, spent the night and drove another four and a half hours to get home. Michael has kept us updated on Cleopatra and she is loving her new home and the Cat Condo tower he bought for her before she arrived (second photo).

The other story is about black-and-white Chilly Willy and orange-and-white Fabian (third photo). Their family came in to check out the cats and immediately fell in love with Chilly Willy. He was putting on quite a show that day just for them. Mom saw Fabian and fell head over heels in love with him. They adopted both of them and are quite content together, as you can see in the pictures. The kids love the cats as well, and we have heard that Fabian is a great cuddle buddy and they both sleep with mom and dad in bed.

With Aubree and Ashton, the family came in looking for just one cat, but, as things happen, mom and dad fell in love with one and the kids fell in love with another, so to make a great ending, they adopted both of the cats and they are both loving their new forever home and being spoiled rotten.

York Adopt-A-Pet: Cat Chow Building Better Lives
What was the money or product used for?

The money enabled YAAP to waive or reduce adoption fees for cats in our shelter.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Our adoption numbers were at an all-time high in December because we were able to waive adoption fees to adopters that would otherwise not be able to afford the adoption fee. We were also able to offer 2-for-1 adoptions to families that wished to adopt two cats.

How many pets did this grant help?

21 to date

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Phyllis had great loss in 2014. She tragically lost her daughter, two of her sisters and her beloved cat. Phyllis’s therapist suggested she adopt a cat and sent a letter to her apartment complex asking that she be able to do so. Phyllis’s daughter had been a YAAP volunteer prior to her death and she had picked out a cat (Buffy) that she felt would fit perfectly for her. When Phyllis came to YAAP, she fell in love with Buffy but also Nova. Because of this Purina grant, we were able to place both cats in Phyllis’s home at no cost to her. Thank you for helping us make Phyllis’s life a little brighter and giving us the opportunity to place two cats in a loving home.

Seminole County Animal Services: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

Spay and neuter of our adoptable pets.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

By helping more animals become highly adoptable.

How many pets did this grant help?

Three cats

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Oliver is a handsome 1-year-old male. He came to the shelter because his owner could no longer care for him. He is a super sweet boy and looks so adorable with his big sad eyes. He also has a small tuft of black hair on the top of his head. Oliver weighs 8 pounds, gets along well with other cats and he will be neutered before going to his forever home thanks to the Sponsor A Pet program!

Meet Oliver: https://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/31534368/