Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

Suncoast Humane Society: Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The funds from this grant were used to treat heartworm disease in several dogs surrendered to Suncoast Humane Society’s animal care center as heartworm-positive.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped the Society save dogs who would have otherwise been too unhealthy to adopt out. Through the use of these grant funds, we are able to continue our mission to “reduce the number of homeless pets and improve the quality of life.”

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant provided treatment for five dogs with heartworm disease.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Awa, a 5-year-old basset hound mix, came to Suncoast Humane Society’s animal care center in September 2015 after being with her latest owner for just three months. Her previous owner’s son turned out to be allergic to Awa. Upon careful examination by trained Suncoast Humane Society staff, Awa tested positive for heartworm and began her treatment regimen to beat the life-threatening disease. Within four days after becoming adoptable, she met the human who would become her forever family. She went home to live with her new family on Nov. 17, 2015.

Woods Humane Society: Build-A-Bear Youth Humane Education Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The grant funds were allocated to support Woods Humane Society’s summer program, Critter Camp, which increased enrollment this year by 25 percent (from 160 children to 200 children) over the course of the summer. Each child had the opportunity to work one-on-one with shelter dogs for an entire week, learning about training, safety, responsible care, and more.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Due in part to this Humane Education grant, Woods Humane Society has been able to increase enrollment in existing Humane Education programs by 15% from July to September, while offering more dynamic and enriching experiences for the youth involved. This dramatically improves our ability to fulfill two of our core missions at Woods Humane Society: providing humane education and nurturing the human-animal bond.

How many pets did this grant help?

At least 100 pets were helped by this grant through the one-on-one socialization they received from Critter Campers.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Bonnie and Clyde (first and second photos, respectively) were a senior, bonded pair of cattle dog/catahoula mixes that came to our shelter in January of 2015. Due to the fact that they were 9 years old and had been outdoor dogs (and therefore not house trained), we were having a very tough time finding a suitable home for them. In addition, Bonnie was extremely shy around new people and needed a good deal of socialization and confidence-building. Both dogs made a great match for our Critter Camp program, working each day for at least two hours with a child age 9-12. During our first week of camp, a 9-year-old girl named Aubrey was assigned to Bonnie. Even though Aubrey, a bright, high-energy gal, was hoping for a very smart, outgoing dog to whom she could teach lots of tricks over the week, she quickly understood that Bonnie would need patience and understanding to help her come out of her shell. By the end of the week, Aubrey had bonded immensely with Bonnie, crying passionately after camp “graduation” out of sadness to end her time with the dog.

Over the next few weeks, we promoted Bonnie and Clyde on a local radio show to try to find the right owners for them. As our Executive Director spoke on the show, a little girl called in to try to help the cause by telling everyone how much she loved Bonnie and what a great dog she was. Before she hung up, the host asked the girl what her name was. The little voice responded, “Aubrey.” Needless to say, this Critter Camper made an enormous difference in Bonnie’s life. Soon after, both Bonnie and Clyde found their forever homes and we get regular updates on them still. Aubrey continues to participate in programs at Woods often and plans to come back for Critter Camp 2016.

Madison Animal Rescue Foundation: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

Vet bills

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The total amount received has been enough to fully vet one animal. Every animal we save is a miracle 🙂

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Renegade was sponsored and has since been adopted. From his Petfinder profile: “Renegade is a sweet boy who loves to play. He is learning basic commands and already knows ‘sit.’ Renegade would be a great pet for a household with another dog his size to play with and expend his puppy energy. Renegade is crate trained and house trained.”

Tri-County Humane Society: Disaster Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The Petfinder Foundation disaster assistance grant of $2500 saved the lives of nine heartworm-positive dogs and allowed us to treat 10 dogs afflicted with skin infections, all of whom were rescued from the flooding in South Carolina. Meet Penelope: https://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/33595119

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant allowed us to provide a speedy response to the medical needs of the 26 dogs rescued from the flooding in South Carolina.

How many pets did this grant help?

26

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Penelope, a small Chihuahua, was one of the dogs who needed urgent care from the Hurricane Joaquin rescue. She tested positive for heartworm as well as Demodectic mange two times. With the diligence of our medical staff and the monetary support of the Petfinder Foundation, Penelope is now heartworm-negative and free from mange!

The Buster Foundation Pit Bull Rescue: Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

This money was used to hire a professional trainer to work with our dogs one-on-one and in group lessons. Our volunteers and fosters received instruction in handling as well.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant gave us the ability to hire a professional dog trainer to work with our dogs and volunteers/fosters one-on-one and in group sessions. Behavior/training issues included general anxiety/fear of new surroundings and people, dog-dog reactivity, pulling on leash, jumping and misbehaving on leash and not knowing basic training (sit, stay, down, wait, etc.). Our volunteers and foster families also benefited by learning how to properly walk the dogs and how to give consistent commands. Because of these classes, our dogs are now able to be taken on walks, by themselves or in groups. This helps greatly with their mental well-being, their health, and in making them more attractive to potential adopters. A dog who is walking calmly on a leash and sitting politely when asked to is much more attractive than one who, while happy, is bouncing about and pulling out of control.

How many pets did this grant help?

About 20 — all the dogs in the organization received some training.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Bundy’s owner passed away in their home, and Bundy (center dog in the first photo) was left there for more than a month with little human contact. During an initial evaluation done by our trainer, it was evident that there were high levels of anxiety, which would come out in the form of reactivity. Bundy was uncomfortable being touched. He was very pushy and jumped almost constantly. A family member became a temporary foster home. We went out several times to do training with Bundy while he learned to trust again. He learned impulse control, basic obedience, and that humans weren’t so bad. We also taught his foster parents how to safely handle and manage Bundy. The training was Bundy’s only chance. He ended up in a wonderful home with two other dog siblings.

Rusty's Angels Sanctuary: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

The $25 donation went toward out vet bill.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The $25 donation paid for a microchip for one of our seniors.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Tilly came to us because her owners had passed away. She is 12 years old. She was still in need of a microchip so the Sponsor a Pet donation made that happen. From her Petfinder profile: “Tilly is a 12-year-old fox terrier who weighs around 20 lbs. She was rescued by an elderly couple in 2010 and for three years was a great companion dog for them. Unfortunately they passed away in 2013 and 2014 and she would LOVE to have an elderly companion once again. She does excellent on leash and would love daily walks but truly enjoys just sitting next to you in your favorite spot. She is very calm and well-behaved and would be great for any elderly person who wants a small- to medium-sized companion. She is spayed and has had recent bloodwork, a dental, vaccines and a microchip.” Meet Tilly: https://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/33206352

Valley Humane Society: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

This money helped defray the costs of feeding and caring for rescued dog Cody and cat Matt.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It helped pay for food, medical treatment and supplies for rescued dogs and cats.

How many pets did this grant help?

2 or more

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Matt was found abandoned, starving, and covered in fleas, so dreadlocked his fur had to be shorn. It took two weeks to get him purring again. Valley Humane Society took him in from one of our partner veterinarians who had found him as a stray. Originally believed to be around 8 years old, it was later decided he was around twice that age. Still, we felt he might find a home! Unfortunately, Matt never did leave our care. After a short time, Matt was diagnosed with colon cancer; we are grateful to have been there at the end of his life to care for him, keep him safe and show him he was loved. He was an amazingly sweet and gentle orange tabby and we miss him to this day.

Cody had been adopted. From his Petfinder profile: “This little ball of energy is ready for adventure. Cody’s a pretty smart little dude who will benefit greatly from training. He’s eager and attentive – which is the perfect setup for learning new things. Keeping him busy and active will suit him just fine. He’s adjusted nicely to his current environment and has settled down since he first arrived. But he enjoys his play time and will thrive in an active household that teaches him what’s expected of him. He walks nicely on a leash and has been socialized with kids. Cody will require regular grooming.”

Valley Humane Society: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

The donation went to fund our animal care expenses. Cordelia was a cat in our care at that time.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Funds are needed to feed, provide litter and other supplies, and maintain medical care for our canine and feline charges.

How many pets did this grant help?

One or more

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Cordelia was a 7- or 8-year-old black cat who had been surrendered at the local county shelter when her elderly guardian moved into assisted living. She had run out of time on her hold period when Valley Humane Society pulled her out. She was on the chubby side, and had a lot of dandruff as she couldn’t groom herself well. Being a black cat as well as a senior kitty made it harder for her to find another forever home, yet she was such a loving girl! Her adopter was another senior lady, and it was like Cordelia chose her.

Saving Death Row Dogs: P.L.A.Y. Pet Beds
What was the money or product used for?

Provided warm beds for foster dogs in our rescue

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The beds are being used for the foster dogs in our rescue. We depend on donations for these types of items for our dogs. These beds are very good quality and our dogs are enjoying them, especially with these cold winter days.

How many pets did this grant help?

10

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

The P.L.A.Y. beds are being used for the foster dogs in our rescue, including London (first photo). From her Petfinder profile: “London is very sweet and playful, but given the choice will sit quietly to get petted. She absolutely loves attention. She does great with other dogs and is still working on her potty training.” Meet London: https://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/33565353 We depend on donations for these types of items for our dogs. These beds are very good quality and our dogs are enjoying them, especially with these cold winter days. Here is a collage of our foster dogs enjoying their new beds. Thank you, Petfinder Foundation, for your generous donations and the help you provide shelters and rescues.

Saving Death Row Dogs: Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

To pay the medical bills for a litter of puppies that we rescued that had contracted parvo.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant helped save the lives of these puppies who would have otherwise died from the disease.

How many pets did this grant help?

7

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Saving Death Row Dogs’ board of directors wants to thank the Petfinder Foundation for the amazing grant received to help pay for the medical expenses for our parvo puppies. On Aug. 1, 2015, we received a call from a rural Kansas shelter asking if we could take a litter of seven puppies. We agreed to help these precious babies. We immediately took them in to the vet to get their shots and be examined. A week later, one of the puppies got sick and that’s when we found out they had parvovirus. We immediately took action, giving them fluids and putting them on a special diet to keep them from dehydrating. We are so happy that every puppy lived. But this type of care comes at a cost. We put an urgent plea out and many of our followers donated funds to help. It was at that point that we turned to the Petfinder Foundation to ask for help. We are honored to report that they heard our plea and approved our grant request for $1,000. We are privileged to be able to work with Petfinder and the Petfinder Foundation. Here are pictures of the seven puppies after they recovered from the deadly virus and with their new families.