Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

Saved By A Whisker Rescue: Cat Chow Building Better Lives
What was the money or product used for?

The money has been used to supplement adoption fees to facilitate the adoption of difficult-to-place and long-term cats in the rescue.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We were able to find homes for several cats and kittens who had only a small chance for adoption.

How many pets did this grant help?

14 cats

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Using this grant, we were able to promote and facilitate the adoption of FLV+ kittens. Feline leukemia is a horrible disease and we were heartbroken when a litter of kittens we had tested positive. We split the kittens up into different foster homes, waited out the period during which they might fight it off, retested the kittens (including IFA), and confirmed that they were officially positive. Despite this crushing news, we were able to find homes and loving families for all the kittens except for one. Poor Genesis (first two photos) waited so patiently for a forever home. Her foster family wanted to adopt her, but did not have the funds to make her an official part of their family. They were thrilled when we told them of this grant and that with it, we would be able to waive Genesis’ adoption fee. The Cat Chow Building Better Lives grant has given Genesis the chance to have a normal life in her very own family.

There once was a boy (kitty) named Sunny (third and fourth photos) whose disposition was sweet as can be. Unfortunately, he was shy and reserved and never showed his true personality when people came to meet him. No one wanted to give him a chance — because who adopts the cat they can’t find? Luckily for Sunny, the Cat Chow Building Better Lives grant allowed us to lower his adoption fee, attracting the perfect family. They took Sunny home as a foster with intent to adopt and within a week called to say they loved him and wanted to keep him forever. It’s sunny days ahead for Sunny thanks to this grant!

Friends of the Jefferson Animal Shelter: Cat Chow Building Better Lives
What was the money or product used for?

To offer reduced adoption fees

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We were able to lower our adoption fees and offer some no-cost adoptions for harder-to-place cats.

How many pets did this grant help?

Thirty felines were adopted.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We were able to provide no-cost adoptions for four hard-to-place adult cats. These adults had been with us a while and each had some challenges that made them harder to place. One was deaf and very reactive, one was fearful, one has a chronic eye issue, and one was a little nippy! Each home was more than willing to work with the cat and ensure they had a good quality of life.

Utah Animal Advocacy Foundation: Cat Chow Building Better Lives
What was the money or product used for?

To offer reduced (or completely waived) adoption fees for difficult-to-adopt and special-needs cats.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We were able to draw attention to some our or tougher kitties by offering a reduced (or completely waived) adoption fee in some cases. We feel that offering these reduced fees has indeed increased the number of special-needs cats who were adopted over the past three months. These included bonded pairs that we desperately wanted to keep together, senior kitties, and kitties with specific health or behavioral issues.

How many pets did this grant help?

Twelve special-needs cats have been adopted through this grant program so far.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Grrrl (first photo) came to the Utah Animal Advocacy Foundation after her previous family moved away and left her behind. She is an older girl at 8 years old and walks a little funny (probably due to a birth defect or old injury). In addition to all her routine vet care, including vaccines, FIV/FeLV testing, and a microchip, we were also able to do x-rays, bloodwork, and a full dental cleaning prior to placing Grrrl for adoption. She was initially overlooked because of her age, but once we reduced her adoption fee, she caught the eye of a young couple who had adopted from us before. We already knew they were a wonderful home, so the application was a cinch! Grrrl is settling in to her new home and doing very well at last report.

Kindra (second photo) was rescued along with her littermates when they were just a couple months old. Sadly, during routine testing, it was discovered that one of the kittens was positive for feline leukemia. Since all the kittens had been exposed, our veterinarian recommended the kittens all be quarantined and retested a month later. That next month, Kindra continued to test negative, so she was spayed and placed for adoption. Because she was no longer a tiny little kitten, and because we didn’t want her to spend any more of her kittenhood in foster care, we decided to reduce her adoption fee to see if we could get her placed as soon as possible. Her new mom saw her in the adoption cages at our veterinary clinic and decided to take her home that same day.

Note: I don’t have a photo, but the little kitten from Kindra’s litter who tested positive for leukemia also found a forever home, and we were able to waive the adoption fee entirely thanks to this grant.

Underdog Pet Rescue of Wisconsin, Inc.: Cat Chow Building Better Lives
What was the money or product used for?

We used the money, combined with some funds received from Best Friends, to reduce our adult cat adoption prices to $25 (from $100) and our kitten adoption prices to $75 instead of $100.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We have been, and are hoping to continue to be, pulling all the already neutered/spayed cats from the shelters we work with, as well as some cats who need sterilization surgeries to keep our finances healthy while still offering this reduced rate. We’ve done some handouts and put them around town to show our reduced-rate adoptions (which will last at least through March). I am so excited to report that in January/February of 2015, we’ve had 17 cat adoptions, compared to January/February of 2014, when we only had two cat adoptions (this time of year is our slowest). Our cats are getting interest much more quickly, and then we can help more cats in shelters who need us. The quality of the applicants has not changed.

How many pets did this grant help?

We’ve had over 20 adoptions in 2015 so far, and we have five more cats in our care who have already received veterinary care and are ready for adoption.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

One cat, Billy (first photo), had been in our care for over two years for no good reason. Thanks to our low-cost adoption fee promotions, Billy and a number of other adult cats have found super, loving, fantastic homes. Older kittens and shy cats who usually don’t get adopted quickly have received more attention and have been having adoption meetings thanks to drawing people in with the promo.

Yaksha (second photo) was a mother to four kittens who came in during kitten season. The babies were adopted out as soon as they were ready to leave mom, and Yaksha sat for a few more months. When we started our $25 promotion, Yaksha was our first cat to find her home (our vet had euthanized an older cat and Yaksha lives at the outreach office we share with our vet. The family saw her on their way out from their sad appointment and fell in love). She has been a great addition to their family.

Tubbs (third photo) was a stray who came in and received lots of love in his foster home. Despite his beauty, he sat for a few months with no interest. Thanks to our promotion, he got more attention and found a very doting, loving new mom. She referred Tigre’s family to adopt him!

Tigre (fourth photo) was an abandoned kitten who grew to be about 10 months of age in our care. He didn’t do his best at introductions to new people, but with the work of his committed foster parents and the right home coming along, he’s frolicking and playing up a storm in his new home.

Ariana (fifth photo), now called Christmas Valentine by her new family, came in as a transfer from a shelter. She was very shy, but due to our promotion, a family came to meet a few kittens at our Coffee and Canines (and Cat Cafe!) event a couple weeks ago. They fell in love with Ariana and have been working to get her to come out of her shell.

Thank you SO MUCH! Thanks to the success up through now (and what will surely be ongoing success with the remainder of the funds from this grant), we hope to find a way to keep our adoption fee for cats between $25-50 on an ongoing basis.

Motley Zoo Animal Rescue: Cat Chow Building Better Lives
What was the money or product used for?

The funds from this grant were used to offer reduced-fee cat adoptions for the cats in our shelter.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Being able to offer reduced-fee adoptions helped us to get more cats adopted as well as find homes from some cats who had been with us long-term.

How many pets did this grant help?

30

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Jewel and Dido (used to be Kori and Kuri) are the most significant story of our use of funds from the Cat Chow Building Better Lives grant. They came to us months ago as a bonded pair. We expected they’d go pretty quickly as they were sweet and friendly, though one a tad more shy than the other. They were staying at one of our partnering pet stores and suddenly started losing hair. A vet’s visit determined they had acquired ringworm, which is a terrible nuisance, though not actually dangerous — however, many animals die in shelters every year for this very treatable condition people fear so much. Our rescue actually takes in dozens of ringworm cat cases every year in an effort to reduce this number, so although we have plenty of experience, this was unexpected and disappointing for these girls.

It took a while for them to get better — the average recovery time is 6-8 weeks. We were able to get them back to one of our partnering stores, but after a short period, the girls became sick — one with a urinary-tract issue and the other with some digestive upset. The culprit and theme behind all of these health issues is, unfortunately, stress — we knew that, in a home environment, they would recover and be healthy, but cats do not get adopted out of foster homes like our dogs do; they really need to be “on display” to show off their personalities to potential adopters.

Although these girls had plenty of interest, no one ended up adopting them for ages. They either changed their minds about adopting, or got kittens instead, or any of a number of weird and disappointing reasons not to pick them. We were starting to become very sad and frustrated for them. Then we received the Cat Chow Building Better Lives grant and were able to reduce their adoption donation significantly, and this spurned new interest in them. Finally, out of the woodwork came their new mom!

We were so happy to finally get them adopted, we practically had a party for them. The employees at their pet store were cheering and so excited. We are just so happy for them and can’t wait to hear more updates about their new fun lives as the queens of their domain! We’re thrilled they can stay together too 😉

Beadle County Humane Society: Cat Chow Building Better Lives
What was the money or product used for?

The funding will help families with a limited income be able to better afford to bring a pet into their home.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant will help the shelter to place more cats into forever homes.

How many pets did this grant help?

We are still working on utilizing this grant.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

To date we have placed only one cat as we had an upper respiratory infection come through our shelter and had to shut down our feline adoptions until all were treated and recovered from this situation. This grant will eventually help us place between 26-30 cats/kittens.

Green Street Rescue: Cat Chow Building Better Lives
What was the money or product used for?

The Petfinder Grant you gave to Green Street Rescue was a blessing and allowed us to keep our adoption fees the same last year, despite a significant increase in basic vet costs and several medical emergencies and/or surgeries costing in the thousands. It also allowed GSR to continue to offer “Adopt one, get his/her buddy or playmate for FREE,” helping to move more rescues and make for happier fur-ever homes for the cats. Thank you for making it possible.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

By being able to still offer a two-for-the-price-of-one adoption fee, we were able to move more cats into forever homes and thereby make room to take in more from the street where they were suffering and reproducing.

How many pets did this grant help?

18-20

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

In the past three months we have adopted out the following pairs: Nick and Noel, a pair of siblings rescued as kittens at three months of age from a small colony in an open lot on the Temple University campus in Philadelphia; Griffin and Lilac (first photo), two kittens rescued individually, who became buddies in their foster home; Cinnamon and Willie Wonka (second photo), two adults, in foster care over a year, who bonded and went together to a home with two children who love them to death; Sassafrass and Sabrina, two siblings who were in foster care for about six months and found a wonderful home together thanks to the “adopt one, get one free” policy; Rosie and Bucky, again two adults rescued separately who bonded in their foster home, will be going to their new forever home on Sunday, March 1, thanks to the low adoption fee for two; Levi and Zeek were another lucky pair of siblings to go to a home together; Lia and Liam (third photo), also siblings, were adopted.

There were also many singles who were adopted. Clover (fourth photo), who had medical issues from his day of rescue on March 17, 2014, and needed expensive surgery for the fistula in the roof of his mouth, found a wonderful home once healthy. Tina, who needed to be treated for ringworm, also found a loving home once cleared of it. The grant money helped to cover their vet bills and keep their adoption fee reduced. Josie and Mandy found homes individually as well, as did several other singles.

Thank you again for supporting rescues like ours. We could not do as much without your support.

Breckinridge County Animal Friends: Cat Chow Building Better Lives
What was the money or product used for?

Medical treatments: spay/neuter, vaccinations and flea treatments.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The first cat, Snow, it payed for his neutering and vaccinations to make his adoption free. The second cat, Captain Hook: medical treatment for injured leg and neutering and vaccinations.

How many pets did this grant help?

Twelve for flea-drop treatments; two for spay/neuter and one for medical treatment

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Captain Hook, the yellow tabby pictured, was rescued with a partially missing leg and missing foot. I found him under a trailer at the local Walmart at about 8-9 weeks old. I took him to our vet; he was given his first shots and examined. The leg injury was healing so he was sent home with me to watch until it was time for neutering. I found him to be a wonderful, gentle kitten and noticed when he played he would try to put the rest of the leg down and was injuring it. So when I took him to the vet in January, we decided to remove the leg as well as neuter him. He is recovering wonderfully from the surgery and adjusting well to the missing leg. He now plays without injuring himself further and is no longer in pain.

I took him to the Adopt-A-Pet event last Saturday at Feeder’s Supply. I am receiving inquires on him and waiting to find the right home for him. Because of the grant, he will live a wonderful full cat life with a wonderful adoptive family. In the first picture, he is the cat on the left lying on Casey. The second picture is of Captain Hook before the surgery; you can see the partial missing leg. The third picture is of Snow, who was adopted to a wonderful family after vaccinations and neutering. He was also a Walmart rescue.

Meet Captain Hook: https://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/29691392/

Animal Nation, Inc.: Cat Chow Building Better Lives
What was the money or product used for?

To waive the adoption fees for some of our long-term cats who have been waiting for homes.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We hoped this incentive would encourage folks to adopt them — and it did! It’s hard to get people to look at older adult cats when there are many young cats or kittens. This incentive was so helpful for our adult guys.

How many pets did this grant help?

15

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

My favorite adoption that was a result of this grant is Ryder, a 4-5 year old calico cat dumped at a vet’s office, whom we had in our care for 10 months. She was continually overlooked for younger cats and kittens, and she needed a specific home: one with no other cats or small kids, as she likes attention on her own terms. The purrfect family saw my flyer with the waived adoption fee thanks to this grant and the rest is history — they adopted her and were the perfect fit! I’ve attached the graphic I made that shows her waived adoption fee — and a few others of her happy tale 🙂

Infinite Hope: Cat Chow Building Better Lives
What was the money or product used for?

We used the grant to subsidize adoption donations. Our usual adoption fee is $150 and we reduced the fee to $75-125, depending on the cat’s future medical expenses (e.g. the cost of an additional future vaccine) and the cat’s adoptability.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant was very helpful in incentivizing the adoption of cats who were less outgoing and may have been otherwise overlooked by potential adopters. Four of the cats adopted through this grant were taken in by Infinite Hope from a person of limited means who rescued cats off the street and kept in them in a basement. The cats were provided with care, but their rescuer had no process in place to adopt them out, and the cats had very little interaction with people. Once they were adopted by families with help from the Cat Chow Building Better Lives assistance, these cats have come out of their shells and have blossomed.

Seven cats who were adopted through this grant were taken into our care through TNR (Trap, Neuter, Return) projects. Infinite Hope is active throughout Brooklyn in TNR efforts to reduce the feral-cat population and to bring cats into foster care who can be homed. Reducing the adoption fees for these cats helped to place them in homes sooner, making more room in foster homes for other adoptable cats and kittens. In addition, we used the grant to subsidize the fee for the adoption of three pairs of kittens. Infinite Hope has a policy to adopt young kittens out in pairs or to homes where there already is a cat in the household. The grant helped offset the initial expense that might have been a deterrent from adopting two kittens.

How many pets did this grant help?

18

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Marcie (first and second photos) was a very sickly kitten when we found her on the back deck of a home in Brooklyn. She had an upper respiratory infection and her eyes were nearly sealed shut. She literally did not see us coming when we scooped her up as part of a targeted TNR effort that Infinite Hope conducted. We brought her into foster care along with six other kittens, named for the Peanuts gang. The Peanuts gang were underweight, anemic, and required treatment for multiple parasitic infections. One kitten did not survive and several others required eye removals, but Marcie was fortunate to recover from her eye infection with only limited corneal scarring. Even before she gained her health through our care, Marcie showed herself to be a loving, charming kitten. When receiving treatment at one vet visit, she stood up on her back legs to knead the shirt of a vet tech, purring happily at the chance to make another friend!

Marcie’s best feline friend is Snoopy, a kitten who was trapped with her and who spent months with her in a foster home while getting the medical care they needed to be ready for adoption. Marcie is outgoing and athletic, and inspired Snoopy into active games of chase and wrestling (even when Snoopy might have preferred to spend the time snoozing on the couch). They were a happy, bonded pair and we were very hopeful to find them a home together. The Cat Chow Building Better Lives grant helped us to incentivize their adoption together to a young couple who saw them on our Petfinder page, came to meet them, and fell in love with their personalities and antics. The attached photos include a picture of Marcie on the day that we found her, as well as a photo of her happily napping on the lap of her adopter. The contrast between Marcie’s condition in the “before” photo – when she very likely would have died from her infections and malnutrition – and the “after” photo, which shows a content cat and an equally happy adopter – is the reason why Infinite Hope volunteers are dedicated to animal rescue. We truly appreciate the support of the Petfinder Foundation and the Cat Chow Building Better Lives grant in helping us to find loving homes for deserving animals.