Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

Animal Aid for Vermilion Area: KONG Toy Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The Kong products we received were brought to the facility that we use for boarding to give to the dogs while they were confined to the kennels.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The products gave the dogs something to do while they were bored in the kennels. The Kongs kept them occupied, which kept them from being restless and destructive.

How many pets did this grant help?

10

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

In December 2017, southern Louisiana was experiencing a cold front that brought the temperatures down to single digits. The local animal shelter was housing dogs outside during this time. We were able to partner with a few local boarding facilities to bring the dogs out of the cold. Some of these dogs have been adopted, but some are still waiting for their forever families seven months later. Chevis is one of those dogs. He has a lot going against him: his appearance, his size, his color, his health. Chevis is a terrific dog who enjoys the company of everyone -- kids, adults, and other dogs. But he is a large, black bully-looking dog with heartworm, which causes him to get overlooked at adoption events, sending him back to the boarding facility. Chevis slowly walks back into his kennel, almost defeated-looking. But he gets very excited when his frozen peanut-butter Kong is handed to him to help him pass the time. More information on Chevis can be found at www.petfinder.com/petdetail/40994212

South Suburban Humane Society: Animal Care EXPO
What was the money or product used for?

We were grateful to receive the $250 grant from the Petfinder Foundation. We used it to purchase dog food through our Purina Shelter Champions program for the dogs in our care.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The state of animal sheltering in the Chicagoland area has been a challenging landscape so far in 2018. As we are operating at capacity daily, we are utilizing 78 lbs. of dog food every day. This amounts to $34 daily and represents a strain on our budget. The grant helped us to fill that budget gap.

How many pets did this grant help?

61 dogs for seven days

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Sip has been in the care of the SSHS for nearly two years. An exuberant hound mix, he struggles to find the right family, but thanks to a staff and a core group of volunteers who are dedicated to him, he stays healthy and happy in the kennels. He loves playgroups and regularly has sleepovers with volunteers. Meet him: www.petfinder.com/petdetail/40006217

Athenspets: Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

We used the money to purchase interactive toys and agility equipment! The toys and equipment were much appreciated by the dogs and required more interaction with the volunteers. A professional dog trainer provided expertise on purchasing agility equipment and will provide volunteer training.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Many of our dogs are overwhelmed when they first arrive. The interactive toys and agility equipment allow for mental and physical stimulation, which reduces anxiety. Overall kennel anxiety was reduced as anxious dogs did not rile up other dogs.

How many pets did this grant help?

30

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Jaxon (first and second photos) is a ball of energy. He wants to run, play -- anything to leave his kennel. If a volunteer happens to somehow exhaust him by playing catch and running him around, Jaxon goes back to his kennel and whines as people pass. It was only after we added in more mentally stimulating exercise that Jaxon seemed content to snooze away during the day! Meet Jaxon: www.petfinder.com/petdetail/41442540

Crossroads Animal Rescue: KONG Toy Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The KONG toys we received were used to help enhance the quality of our rescue pets' lives. Every morning, we make sure that each of our rescue dogs is accompanied by his or her very own KONG toy filled with treats. We use the toys to make the pets happier, keep them occupied, and ease their anxiety while they await their forever homes.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Our rescue pets are ever so thankful for this grant. The KONG toys we received give our pets the extra perk of excitement and happiness they need to get through the often long and lonely journey of awaiting adoption. When some of our rescue pets come to us with nowhere else to go, they tend to get really anxious, and KONG toys help calm their anxiety by giving them something to play with and a sense of security. The KONG toys have given our pets something fun to focus on aside from all the changes they have endured when becoming part of our rescue. Our pets are happier with KONG toys.

How many pets did this grant help?

25

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Our staff went out to feed a few of our rescue dogs one morning and noticed that there was an extra pup that we did not put there. It turned out that this sweet pup's owner had dropped her off in our pen without our knowledge. We are glad that she is healthy and that our dogs welcomed her unexpected arrival. Surprise (first photo) is a beautiful Australian cattle dog/blue heeler mix who is still up for adoption. She has enjoyed playing with her newfound friends and their new KONG toys. Meet her: www.petfinder.com/petdetail/42043957

Sadie (second photo) is currently living as our office dog and loves the attention she gets from everyone. She is around 8 years old and has been with us since May of 2017. She has Cushing's disease, which is caused by a tumor on her adrenal gland. The tumor causes Sadie to have a large belly, which has recently made it nearly impossible for her to go up or down stairs; otherwise, she has no problem getting around. For Sadie, this disease causes her to have increased thirst, hair loss, and more frequent urination. Her symptoms are well-managed with a few medications, but she will not recover from the disease. Despite the Cushing's, she lives a comfortable life and loves to lie around the office with her toys. Meet her: www.petfinder.com/petdetail/38199511

Central Missouri Humane Society: New Year, New Home
What was the money or product used for?

The funding received from the Petfinder Foundation allowed us to waive/reduce adoption fees for several animals in our shelter. Kitten season started early at our shelter and we quickly became overwhelmed with the amount of adult cats and kittens in our care. We also had several dogs with mild behavior or medical issues who were having a more difficult time finding the right home. This grant allowed us to host an adoption promotion where fees were reduced for both adult cats and dogs at our shelter. Almost all of our foster homes were overwhelmed with kittens who were too young for adoption and the shelter was filled with adult cats looking for homes. This grant allowed us to reduce adoption fees to $20 for cats and just $50 for dogs! A few weeks later, many of our kittens were ready to be adopted and we held another adoption promotion and reduced fees again for all cats and kittens! Spay/neuter surgery, vaccinations, microchipping, FIV/FELV testing and preventatives were all included with the reduced adoption fee.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant helped us to place several animals into homes and raise awareness of our shelter and all of the animals in our care. During our first adoption promotion, we were able to place 13 animals into homes: seven cats and six dogs! During the first three days of our second adoption promotion, we were able to place 14 more cats and kittens! Not only did this grant help us place animals into homes, it also helped open up space in our shelter for more animals in need. Kitten season is overwhelming each year and being able to offer adoption promotions helped moved cats and kittens out of the shelter quickly and allowed us to take in more stray, abandoned and homeless animals. The adoption promotions also helped us increase general awareness for our shelter and helped us increase our network of foster homes. Every new foster home makes a huge difference for us, especially in the spring and summer months, when space is limited. Thank you, Petfinder Foundation!!

How many pets did this grant help?

54

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

In early April, a good Samaritan came to our door to relinquish a stray he had found wandering the streets (first photo). She was a beautiful tan-and-white pit bull mix who had terribly cropped ears and appeared to have been used for breeding. When no owner came forward to claim her, we evaluated her before placing her up for adoption. She passed her evaluation with flying colors! She had an incredibly sweet disposition and was very gentle and loving with everyone she met, dogs included. And she had the best butt-wiggle ever! Her incredibly sweet personality helped us come up with the perfect name for her: Cookie Dough! Cookie Dough was not only an amazing dog but a wonderful representative of her breed. A young couple came to the shelter to look at dogs and consider taking one home to join their family. They took a few dogs outside to play before a staff member suggested they meet Cookie Dough. They immediately fell in love with her! They had no other animals at home and would be able to give Cookie Dough all the love and attention she deserved. Our staff members were thrilled to see her find such a great home and several tears of joy were shed. The adopters took her home that afternoon and were so grateful to have found her!

Kitten Angels: P.L.A.Y. Pet Beds
What was the money or product used for?

Provide soft beds for the foster cats in our care.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We received 10 P.L.A.Y beds from the grant and we decided that, since they were too large for our adoption centers, we would distribute them to our fosters so that our cats in their care could enjoy a nice soft bed.

How many pets did this grant help?

More than 30

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Walt is a special-needs cat in our care since February 2018. He was born in North Carolina with a heart defect and requires daily medicine to maintain his blood pressure. We brought Walt into our program as he had little to no chance of being adopted in the South. He is a 2-year-old Siamese mix who is very sweet and will keep you company with his talking. Walt sleeps more than the usual cat due to his heart condition, so he needs a comfortable bed. His foster placed the P.L.A.Y bed in a quiet place in her apartment for Walt. He immediately went to the bed and now this is where he sleeps. Walt's Petfinder profile can be viewed at www.petfinder.com/petdetail/41140446

Kitty Cat Prevent a Litter Society: New Year, New Home
What was the money or product used for?

We used the Petfinder Foundation funds to pay for treatment and transportation for four cats who had complex medical issues. The Petfinder Foundation funds of U.S. $2,000 equaled approximately $2,500 Canadian dollars at a conversion rate of 1.28.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Thanks to the grant funds from the Petfinder Foundation, we were able to get cats with complex medical issues the treatment needed, foster them through recovery, adopt two to loving homes without any extra costs for the adopter, and in Sambuca’s case, deliver him to a wonderful refuge for FIV-positive cats.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant allowed us to care for four cats.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Limerick (first photo): Total medical care cost of $239.56 CAD. Limerick, a 12-year-old black-and-white male cat, was found in Cumberland scrounging for food. Thankfully, an animal lover recognized that this emaciated, sad-looking kitty needed help, fed him, and then called KCP. Limerick was flea-infested and extremely underweight, but very sweet. His tattoo simply read "KCP," and we discovered that he was from an old feral colony in Cumberland that KCP had helped TNR (trap/neuter/return) years ago. The colony caretaker had passed away and Limerick had been left to fend for himself. The Comox Valley Animal Hospital determined that Limerick has hypothyroidism. His condition will be managed with medication for the rest of his life. Since being in KCP foster care, Limerick is thriving, gaining weight, and his coat is once again shiny. He is a loving kitty who seeks attention whenever possible, has a quiet purr and enjoys being brushed as well as lots and lots of treats. Limerick remains in foster care while we seek a loving, forever home for him.

Windy (second photo): Total medical care costs of $1049.19 CAD. Windy is a gorgeous black cat rescued by KCP as a kitten in 2017. A wonderful family adopted him, and he flourished. However, Windy likes to eat things. Odd things. He eats any small, squishy thing he can find: Nerf pellets from toy guns, plants (real and artificial), and small cat toys. Windy ended up with a stomach obstruction and several items lodged in his intestinal tract. Comox Valley Animal Hospital performed surgery to remove the blockage. Once home, he was okay for a few days until the signs of blockage occurred again. After being rushed to the vet, he was operated on once more. Poor little guy; he just can't help himself. We're not sure if it's a texture issue that he'll grow out of, or if he has an eating disorder called pica. Either way, we successfully adopted him to a home where he lives a very controlled life with an owner who continuously cat-proofs her house to prevent Windy from eating something again. It’s not likely he’d survive a third surgery. We hope he grows out of his destructive habit.

Sambuca (third photo): Total medical care and transportation costs to Richmond Animal Protection Society of $732.23 CAD. Sambuca, a large black-and-white intact male cat, was trapped in a residential area in Courtenay. We thought he was feral as he was difficult to trap, wary of humans, and a "scrapper" judging by his unkempt appearance, cloudy eye and various wounds. After a few days in our shelter, volunteers saw a different Sambuca, seeking affection and engaged. When we had Sambuca neutered, the Comox Valley Animal Hospital determined that he was blind in one eye and in significant pain from rotten teeth. A second surgery removed his eye and a few teeth. He came through with flying colors and was more loving after surgery. Sadly, Sambuca tested positive for FIV -- feline immunodeficiency virus. FIV compromises a cat's immune system, making it harder to fight off infections. Typically, FIV is contracted through deep bite wounds from fighting. Intact males are at high risk, as they fight more. Although FIV-positive cats can live long and relatively healthy lives, there is risk of passing it on to other cats. Sambuca stayed in foster for many months but was not adopted. We determined that the best outcome for Sambuca was to live out his life at RAPS (Richmond Animal Protection Society), a fantastic sanctuary for FIV-positive cats in Vancouver. Several of our volunteers accompanied him to his new home and we have reports that he is thriving.

Scout: Total medical care costs of $712.85 CAD. Scout is beautiful, young male domestic short haired silver tabby. Scout came from a rural property in Merville where unfixed cats are frequently abandoned. Scout’s mom abandoned him, but he bonded with another semi-feral tabby, Ivy, who'd also had babies at this property. Ivy and Scout stayed around the farmer's house most of the time, although both were scared and didn’t want contact. KCP trapped both Ivy and Scout. Safe at our shelter, it was soon apparent that Scout liked human contact, he was just terrified. The poor little guy would shiver in his cage and wasn't eating well. The vets at Comox Valley Animal Hospital diagnosed Scout with feline stomatitis, an extremely painful inflammation of the mouth and gums. Ulcers form on the lips, tongue, gums and back of throat from chronic irritation due to plaque build-up on teeth, making eating a painful challenge. One treatment is to remove the cat's teeth. Once the teeth are gone, there is no plaque build-up, and inflammation stops. Cats can live long, healthy, pain-free lives after surgery. We treated Scout with several rounds of antibiotics and tender loving care in one of our foster homes. Scout's inflammation level is currently under control; however, he will require costly surgery in the very near future. He remains in long-term foster care until we can complete his surgery. Then we will find him a loving forever home.

L.A.S.S.I.: Senior Pet Adoption Grants
What was the money or product used for?

Weekly allergy injections, medicated shampoo, senior dog food, joint supplements, orthopedic bed.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant assisted Kila (a 9-year-old pit bull with severe allergies) in helping to keep her comfortable with weekly allergy injections, medicated shampoo, joint supplements to help her with her aging joints, a new orthopedic bed to keep her comfortable, and senior dog food. Kila has been in foster care for the past several months because she was shutting down in the shelter setting and this grant really gave her the quality of life she deserved.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Kila arrived at the shelter on November 4, 2017, is terrible condition. She basically had no hair and, since she was a senior dog (when she arrived, she was 8), staff and volunteers knew they had to jump into quick action. After some testing and a medical review, it was found that she was severely allergic to almost everything. She couldn't be with another animal, and was allergic to trees, dust mites, cats -- you name it. She was shutting down in the shelter setting, so a specialized foster home was found for her and she thrived. We just found out today (June 26, 2018) that she was adopted! We couldn't be happier for her. The grant from the Petfinder Foundation helped her during her recovery and she is now on to a happy home life! Thank you so much!

Gateway Pet Guardians: Consider A Shelter Pet
What was the money or product used for?

The funds were used for enrichment toys and supplies for our shelter and foster pets.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Any time we can utilize funds from programs like this, it frees up money for healthcare, which averages more than $20,000 a month.

How many pets did this grant help?

15

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Touchette is a sweet, petite playgroup rock star who doesn't show well at the shelter. She is not fond of folks coming to her door. Making her life more fun behind bars makes us, and her, feel better. She is still available for adoption but is now in a foster home. Meet her: www.petfinder.com/petdetail/41318959

Illinois Valley Animal Rescue: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

The $22.50 was spent on a new cover for Jaguar's couch.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

A new cover might not have been purchased if the money was not available.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Jaguar has been at the shelter for more than a year. He has an extra-large kennel with his own full-size couch. Jaguar is a gentle dog who likes to take care of business outside, but prefers being on the couch and would do well in a quiet home. Meet him: www.petfinder.com/petdetail/38217862