Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

Ramapo-Bergen Animal Refuge, Inc.: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

To sponsor Reese until she was adopted ($22.50)

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The funds donated offset the costs of medical care for adoptable dogs and cats.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

A RBARI staff member adopted sweet Reese! Reese is doing very well. She fits right into her home filled with tiny puppy friends, and her new mom loves Reese very much.

Corridor Rescue, Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The grant we were awarded was used to help with a lifesaving surgery for a puppy, Jeremiah, whom we rescued off the streets of Houston.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped defer monies needed for a lifesaving surgery for a puppy rescued by Corridor. With the grant funds and other donations, we were able to cover a portion of the surgery costs. This allowed us to continue to help another street dog in need.

How many pets did this grant help?

One directly, two to three indirectly

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Jeremiah was rescued as a stray with his siblings off the streets of Houston. Very quickly, we realized that Jeremiah was not well. He was vomiting and not gaining weight and acted as if something was stuck in his throat. When he was seen by a specialist after the general vet said there was nothing stuck, he was diagnosed with persistent right aortic arch (PRAA). It is a congenital abnormality of the blood vessels of the heart that can affect esophageal function in some dogs. Basically, an embryonic branch of the aorta fails to regress and is wrapped around the esophagus when the dog is a puppy.

The only way to resolve this is to surgically remove the embryonic branch. Due to the stricture, Jeremiah’s esophagus was enlarged where food would become stuck. This enlargement did not completely rectify itself after the surgery, so Jeremiah now suffers from megaesophagus. This, however, is a manageable special need.

Jeremiah has had a Bailey’s Chair donated to him (third photo) that will continue to grow with him. Should he outgrow it, they will replace the chair and we will pass his on to another dog in need. Other than having to eat a soft diet in a special chair, Jeremiah is a typical 7-month-old puppy. He loves to play with other dogs and loves to be with people. Meet Jeremiah here.

Because Animals Matter: Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Interactive toys/chews
Snuffle mats that we assembled with the help of volunteers
Training/exercise aids
Sensory enrichment
Dietary support — specifically to promote weight and muscle gain and improve general food consumption on low-weight dogs we took into care
Non-medical physical care

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Our facility is relatively unique in that we allow all dogs (unless they require crate rest, are being quarantined, or are unaltered and need separate free time) indoor and outdoor free-play when our volunteers are on site. With only two shifts a day, however, that can lead to many hours kenneled. Receiving this grant award allowed for our implementation of a daily schedule where dogs have regular access to safe hard chews, interactive toys, different sensory enrichment through oil diffusion in the facility each day, and mentally stimulating meals with kibble served on/in the snuffle mats we put together.

In particular, some of the larger dogs in our care had shown toy aggression around other dogs before we implemented the project. After a more regimented routine and more physical and mental stimulation, it was as if those dogs no longer felt the need to hoard or solely possess toys.

We have found that some of our dogs have been downright too smart for a couple of the puzzle toys we got, but we can shift them to something different and more challenging as a result of having access to funding that allowed for multiple types and “levels” of toys to be purchased.

This grant also supported one of our community outreach programs by giving us access to better/safer training and exercise aids in martingale collars and shorter (and more comfortable to hold) leashes. These tools are now used by our community volunteers who visit That BAM Place to participate in our Canine Companion Club. This program allows for Club-approved dogs at our facility to go on hikes, walks, trips to the dog park, and sleepovers. We know the dogs are safer and our volunteers have had better results in controlling and training dogs on walks. Reports from Club participants since getting the new martingales and shorter leashes are that they feel the dogs are managed easily.

The grant has also saved us from extra veterinary expenses through the purchase of rubber dog “boots” for one of our puppies whom we took in with a broken leg. The break required a splint and bandage wrap and was requiring regular replacement to avoid other issues as a result of the puppy stepping in water and peeing on it. Extra splinting and wound care was no longer an issue once we purchased the boots; regular access to the outdoors was also then available without concern.

How many pets did this grant help?

27 to date

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Louie (first and second photos) is a senior Chihuahua mix who came into our care from a Southern California shelter. He was receiving no interest from the public because he just stood around, seeming lost much of the time. Once he joined us at That BAM Place, we soon learned that he had skin, eye, and kidney issues. While all of these things were manageable and treatments began, Louie still acted off and fearful of the other dogs in the facility. When it came to free-play, Louie would choose to stay in his safe space.

After making and testing just one large snuffle mat, we decided to make a smaller one for Louie. Though we just poured his kibble on top that first night, it was like he lit up. The next day it was as if a switch had gone off for him; Louie voluntarily left his kennel and joined the other dogs in the office and free-play area. It seemed clear at that point that a simple toy or act of enrichment could not only help a dog spend time safely and make for a more satisfying experience in our facility, but that it can engage the brain and even make a dog more confident.

Unfortunately, Louie’s story doesn’t have a successful adoption at the end. His kidney disease does not allow him to be put under sedation safely, and he is now in pain from a tumor that has ruptured and cannot be removed. We will be saying goodbye to him tomorrow. Louie has made tremendous strides for an old, partially deaf and blind dog in the two and a half months that he has called That BAM Place home. We feel like this is primarily a result of the enrichment tools that engaged his other senses and made the world a more inviting place.

Beartooth Humane Alliance: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

This Emergency Medical Grant was used for the extraordinary medical expenses for Trixie, a young cat found with a rear leg injury requiring amputation.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The $450 Petfinder Foundation grant was use in its entirety to offset the veterinary costs of the leg amputation and other related medical costs (i.e. X-rays and antibiotics). This has allowed us to “pay it forward” by tending to other pets in need of extraordinary medical care. Thank you, Petfinder Foundation!

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

On Monday, Aug. 27, 2018, a pathetic-looking stray cat was seen dragging her hind end alongside a road just outside of Red Lodge, Montana. A kind lady was able to trap her a few days later and located the owner. The owner said the cat was wild and had run away. The owner then relinquished the cat to the Beartooth Humane Alliance for care. The cat was transported to Grizzly Peak Animal Hospital in Red Lodge, where she was evaluated under sedation. An excerpt from the veterinary records: “The left hind leg has a birth defect of the hock that formed abnormally and rotated with weight-bearing one dorsal aspect of hock with contracture of the leg with very limited range of motion in stifle joint.” In layman’s terms, the leg was rotated backwards and was unusable, causing her to use the stifle joint for stability, resulting in chronic, painful, infected wounds.

During the exam, she was tested for FELV and FIV (both were negative), vaccinated for FVRCP and rabies, dewormed and treated her for ear mites. She weighed in at 4 lbs. and was estimated to be a little over a year old. She was given a bath, as that deformed leg was caked with dried feces. It was the opinion of Dr. Rebecca Frank that the leg needed to be amputated to give her pain relief and more mobility. The foster mom complained that her leg would get caught on different things and accumulated feces on it when the cat used the litter box. With much time and patience from her foster family, this initially frightened cat, named Trixie, now craved human attention and enjoyed the companionship of the foster family’s dogs and other cats.

On Sept. 20, 2018, Trixie had her left hind leg amputated and was spayed at the same time. She weighed in at 6.4 lbs. She was started on pain medication that consisted of Onsior and a Fentanyl patch. During the surgery, she was given an antibiotic IV called cefazolin. One day post-op, she developed a fever of 103.5 and required an antibiotic injection. She went back to the foster home mobile and afebrile. This cat truly has done remarkably in all aspects – medical and personality.

Trixie, who had been severely handicapped and fear -aggressive, was now a normally functioning, healthy cat with an endearing, sweet disposition.

Within days after Trixie’s surgery, one of our own employees, Patty, fell in love with Trixie’s affectionate personality. Patty recently lost her elderly cat and was able to offer Trixie a quiet home in which to recuperate and unlimited attention and love. Patty reports, “Trixie sleeps on the bed with me pretty much all night, but she plays off and on through the night. So affectionate and playful, you would never know she only has three legs — it doesn’t stop her from having fun one bit! It surprises me how much love some cats want, even after a rocky start with people. Her favorite spot now is by the electric heat or lying in the window. She is queen of the house, for sure!”

Columbia Humane Society: P.L.A.Y. Pet Beds
What was the money or product used for?

We were awarded Warm Bellies Chill Pads to put in the dogs’ kennels.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

These Warm Bellies Chill Pads gave our dogs a nice, cozy place to curl up in their kennels. We rely on donations for pet beds and blankets and we, and our dogs, appreciate receiving such good-quality pads. The pads are easy to wash, which is important, and can be used multiple times. The pads are used on an elevated bed or on the floor, depending on the dog. Some of our dogs actually take them off the elevated beds to make themselves a little nest on the floor, which suggests they are making their kennel feel safe and a bit more like “home.” Thank you very much for the pads!

How many pets did this grant help?

10+

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Trey and Duncan were two of four dogs who came to the Columbia Humane Society from a dog-meat farm, Farm 13, in South Korea. Humane Society International helped close the farm and transition the farmer into other lines of work. All four dogs were frightened and shut down when they arrived at the Columbia Humane Society, but devoted volunteers and staff have been giving the dogs love, medical care and compassionate behavioral training to prepare them for their forever homes.

Trey (first photo) loves to sit on his Warm Bellies pad now and is learning to enjoy human companionship. He is actually quite a clown as he dances on his hind legs like a furry bear for treats.

Duncan (second photo) is a vivacious little white dog who adores attention and enjoys his mat for not only snuggling but also for belly rubs.

Waylin, a little Chihuahua (third photo), came to the shelter with an intestinal problem that is currently being treated by a veterinarian. He loves curling up on his Warm Bellies pad, but in the photo is currently “at attention” for the treats he hopes are forthcoming!

Bella (fourth photo) was initially adopted in Idaho and brought to Oregon. Her family could no longer keep her and so she was surrendered to Columbia Humane Society. This sweet-tempered and gentle dog really appreciates being able to chill out on her elevated Warm Bellies pad. Currently all the dogs are awaiting their forever homes. Meet Bella here.

Boxer Luv Rescue: KONG Toy Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Kong toys are being used for enrichment and play during the dogs’ exercise periods, and while they are kenneled and awaiting foster-home placement.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Allows our rescues a variety of play experiences during exercise times.

How many pets did this grant help?

Donated toys are shared by 15-20 dogs at any given time.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Lucas arrived from Mexico on Oct. 9, 2018. He had been with a rescue group there after he was found, starved, on the streets. He stayed with Boxer Luv Rescue for just over a month and loved the Kong toys during his stay with us. Lucas was a nice, big, sweet, social boy. He went to his forever home just after Thanksgiving.

A Safefurr Place Animal Rescue, Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Molly was on the euthanasia list at the shelter after being hit by a car. Her front leg was badly broken. We were able to use the money to have Molly’s front leg amputated.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped by saving Molly’s life! Without this grant, Molly’s fate was grim. She has now recovered wonderfully and is up for adoption!

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This grant saved Molly’s life. The city shelter was going to euthanize her due to lack of funds. So we pulled her! She needed a leg amputation since her leg was badly broken from a car hitting her. Molly is currently in a foster home and available for adoption. From her Petfinder profile: “Molly came to us greatly injured from being hit by a car. Luckily Animal Control found her and contacted us right away to start treating her. Her front leg was badly broken, so our choice was to amputate. Molly is recovering beautifully in her foster home and has adjusted so quickly to only having three legs! Molly lives with other dogs, cats and kids and does wonderfully. She loves attention and to be a lap dog. This sweet three-legged girl is available for adoption and will make a great addition to your home!” Meet Molly here.

Almost Heaven Golden Retriever Rescue & Sanctuary, Inc.: KONG Toy Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The Kongs were given to our intakes and residents to stimulate their playtime activities.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Some of our dogs don’t like toys, but many of them love Kong toys. A few have even found interesting ways of bouncing them back and forth — and many loved “finding the treat” in others.

How many pets did this grant help?

At least 30

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Annie (first two photos) and Scooby (second photo) are just two of our orphans who have benefited from having appropriate toys — toys that cannot be easily destroyed and then ingested.

Meet Annie here.
Meet Scooby here.

Outcast Rescue: Senior Pet Adoption Grants
What was the money or product used for?

Adoption fee and supplements for our senior dog Suky

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Outcast Rescue will waive Suky’s adoption fee of $275 and provide the adopter with arthritis supplements and Omega-3 for six months (Dasuquin is $75 per month and Welactin Omega is $24 per month).

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

While has not been officially adopted, she does have an approved application and a meet scheduled for next week. From her Petfinder profile: “Meet senior gal Suky! This gentle old girl was surrendered to a shelter and we were able to help her out by giving her a warm home to sleep in until she is adopted. Suky is 10 years old and is currently being treated for Lyme disease. She has some arthritis in her hind legs, as expected of any dog this age. Suky is very friendly and loving. She is housebroken and crate trained. She is good with other dogs and cats.” Meet Suky here.

Dog Town Rescue: Senior Pet Adoption Grants
What was the money or product used for?

Purchase of enzyme supplement for our older dog, Buck, who had exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI).

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It did help us purchase the enzymes, and make the offer to adopters to have the cost supplemented via the grant.

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Unfortunately, Buck has passed away. He stopped eating and our vet took x-rays and found two large masses, one in his chest and the other in his intestines. They were consistent with metastatic pancreatic cancer, and we had no choice but to have him euthanized.

We appreciate the generosity of the Petfinder Foundation, and will use the remaining funds to help one of our other dogs in need. We have an older dog named Hera who has an enlarged heart and requires daily medicine, and we will make the offer to any potential adopters for her.