Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

10th Life Surgical Center dba A DOGGIE 4 YOU: Disaster Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The $2,000 Disaster Grant money was used to replace water-damaged dry food supplies ($1,442.87) and pay higher utility bills resulting from power-grid failure ($557.13).

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The $2,000 Disaster Grant helped to recover the loss of food to keep the rescued dogs healthy. The utility bills helped to keep the heat on during the winter once the energy issues were corrected.

How many pets did this grant help?

172 dogs

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Wally, the escape artist, as he has been known by A Doggie 4 You staff, was a long-term resident at the rescue. We are sure that escaping his yard is how Wally came to be separated from his former home.

When Wally first came to A Doggie 4 You, we were unaware of his past life and placed him in a normal kennel. Much to our surprise, he quickly shimmied up and over the six-foot chain-link outdoor kennel. Next, we thought we would outsmart Wally and put a covering over the top of his kennel. But no, we were wrong. Wally has a unique talent for finding a way to squeeze his body out of any confined area!

One day while construction was going on at the rescue, a potential adopter drove up and saw Wally sitting loose close to a pickup truck just outside the kennels. She assumed that he belonged to one of the construction workers. When she mentioned the dog to the rescue staff, she was told, “Don’t worry, that’s just Wally, our escape artist. He’s perfectly happy. We will put him up later.”

Thankfully, Wally’s long tenure at the rescue recently ended when he was adopted. We were so happy for him and his forever family. The family was made very aware of his Houdini escape-artist tricks! So far, so good, as Wally has not returned to the rescue on his own nor by his adopters.

Tyler’s Rescue, Inc.: KONG Toy Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Enrichment for our dogs while they wait for their forever homes

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant of Kongs helped our dogs alleviate boredom and work their minds, and helped our high-energy dogs burn off energy as they used their noses to sniff what was in the Kongs.

How many pets did this grant help?

20

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Ziggy (first photo) is a dog who came to us in really rough shape, medically. After he was treated and recovered from his medical issues and found to be deaf and half-blind, he spent most of his days sleeping and being inactive. We decided to give him a Kong to see if he would react to it. His little nose started twitching when he got a hold of the smell of what we stuffed the Kong with, and he actually was able to find it and enjoy it (second photo)! Now he barks for his daily Kong and goes at it with such eagerness. Ziggy had been adopted and still gets his daily Kong. Thank you, Kong Company!

Philadelphia Animal Welfare Society (PAWS): Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Funds helped cover the cost of emergency medical care for Barley, a shelter dog in our care.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Thanks to the Petfinder Foundation, Barley is happy, healthy, and loved in her adoptive home! After her hospitalization, Barley continued to make a smooth recovery and is now in stable health.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Barley came to PAWS as a seemingly straightforward medical case similar to many of the pets we save: She was found as a stray with an injured front leg, brought to Philadelphia’s animal-control shelter, and needed diagnostics and care beyond their resources. As that shelter’s largest lifesaving partner, PAWS was called upon to transfer her in. We rescued her, x-rayed her leg to rule out a fracture, and scheduled her for a routine spay. Halfway through her spay surgery, her situation turned critical: Barley’s blood wasn’t coagulating properly, and she was hemorrhaging into her abdomen.

Our vet staff worked for hours to stabilize her, but it became clear that she needed emergency intervention to survive, so we rushed her to Veterinary Specialty and Emergency Center, a longtime partner of PAWS. After an additional surgery, 48 hours of round-the-clock care, and multiple plasma transfusions to give her body what it needed to clot, Barley pulled through. She was diagnosed as having an unknown blood-clotting disorder and was soon stable enough to begin recuperating in a foster home.

Although she’s been recovering steadily, Barley recently hit another roadblock when her injured leg took a turn for the worse. Her original medical plan included exploratory leg surgery, which had to be pushed back after her emergency. But when she stopped eating and stopped bearing weight on her leg, the risk of waiting became too great. Our veterinary staff operated immediately and discovered a rubber band wrapped around her leg bone that was so deeply embedded, her skin had completely healed over it.

In foster care, Barley had a continued journey of healing as we learned more about her coagulative disorder and possible long-term effects of her leg injury. Once she was ready for adoption, we listed her on Petfinder and she soon found a loving home with adopter Francis.

Francis says: “Thank you so much for introducing me to Barley and letting me bring her home. I’ve never received so many puppy kisses! Made her a fancy dinner and now it’s time to get her acclimated. Thank you for introducing us! You have no idea how much this has changed my life.”⁠

We announced Barley’s adoption, with tagged recognition to Petfinder Foundation, on Facebook and Instagram.

Animal Rescue of the Rockies: Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

We were able to purchase lots of dog toys and dog beds.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant helped these pets feel happy and secure in their foster homes. Often, a bed or toy from the foster home is sent along to the adoptive home as an added security blanket — a very positive benefit. The toys helped the dogs learn positive chewing activities, not destructive behaviors. The beds kept the dogs snug and warm.

How many pets did this grant help?

250

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We are so happy to share that Sawyer was recently adopted! He came to us in November and after the first day, his foster mom said, “Sawyer is completely shut down. After we got him inside after he spent three hours last night running/hiding in our backyard, he’s gone out one time today and has not moved from the same spot. We haven’t had a dog this despondent before. It’s heartbreaking.”

It took him over a month to get comfortable with his foster parents. He was adopted out once, but returned because he wouldn’t stop howling in his new home. Then it took five or more additional meet-and-greets for him to finally find the perfect home! Sawyer has come a long way, with more to go. But he’s with a great and patient family now. The second and third photos are of Sawyer in his new home and meeting the grandbaby for the first time.

We can’t thank his foster parents, Toni and Jim, enough. They love him so much and worked so hard with him. And a huge thanks to Debbie and Thomas for giving Sawyer a chance and adopting him.

Cenla Cat Project: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Veterinary care for Pyewacket, a 6-month-old kitten who had been hit by a car and suffered substantial injuries.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Pyewacket was found by a good Samaritan and surrendered to Cenla Cat Project. He had a broken rear leg, a broken pelvis, and a severe inguinal hernia. His veterinary bills were more than $4,000. With help from our Facebook community and an Emergency Medical Grant from the Petfinder Foundation, his medical treatment was covered.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Pyewacket has been one fortunate feline. His luck began when a good Samaritan reached out to Cenla Cat Project (CCP) and we agreed to take him. How could we not find a way to help this little 6-month-old Siamese mix who purred the whole time he was being examined?

We were told that he would need major surgery and time to heal. His luck continued when the Petfinder Foundation and our Facebook community rallied to cover his veterinary expenses. He had to be kenneled for six weeks after his surgery to heal, and he continued to offer purrs for his caretakers.

We knew Pye would find his home quickly once he was healed and put up for adoption. We didn’t realize it would happen within two hours of being posted! This handsome boy found a great family. He has a kitty brother at home and two children who love him. His parents are spoiling him, which makes us happy. We are ever so grateful for his recovery and adoption.

HUMANE SOCIETY OF SOMERSET COUNTY: KONG Toy Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The Kong toys were used for our dogs in the kennel for kennel stress, and given with adoptions of the same type dogs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It greatly relieves their kennel stress and helps them to relax.

How many pets did this grant help?

50

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We had a very high-stress dog named Norman (first and second photos). Having the Kong helped him with his stress indoors. The Kong was also was the only type of toy he wouldn’t rip apart. He has been adopted and he went home with a nice new Kong toy.

Adopt-A-Dog: Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The funds were used to purchase enrichment toys for the dogs in our care who needed new stimulation. Many have been long-term residents, so we look to find different ways to engage and interest them. These funds were used to buy Kongs, flirt poles, Chuckit! cubes, and tunnels.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The funds helped our pack a lot by giving them new things to play with, especially during the winter months and during Covid when volunteers were not able to come on-site to walk them. In addition, the Kongs helped our volunteers stay engaged through our Kong and Dash program: We left empty Kongs in a bin outside and volunteers would take them home, fill them with shelter-approved treats, and then drop them back. A win/win for dogs and people!

How many pets did this grant help?

18

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Because many of our dogs do not socialize well with other dogs, they need to be stimulated by toys and activities with their trainers and handlers. All of the Adopt-A-Dog pack benefited from the toys and activities purchased with the Orvis Animal Care Grant. One example of a specific dog who benefited is Leo (first photo), who is our longest resident and sadly needed ACL surgery. While he did his rehab and recovery, those Kongs filled with treats kept him calm and busy! Meet Leo here.

Carolina Cat Rescue: Senior Pet Adoption Grants
What was the money or product used for?

Belle is a senior kitty with thyroid issues and anemia. The grant funds were used to help get her adopted by discounting her adoption fee to zero and assisting the adopter with the first year of food and vet care. The funding was used for:

Adoption fee subsidy – $65
Methimazole – $40.15
B12 injectable – $7.99
100 ml of subcutaneous fluids – 6 bags $63.54
Food:
Royal Canin Renal + HP dry food – 4 bags $200
Royal Canin renal wet food – 6 orders – $250
Forza10 renal wet – 6 orders – $331
Two vet visits and bloodwork – $524

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Belle had been up for adoption for six months with no interest at the time we applied for the grant. It helped Belle by spurring more interest in her and finding her a home. It helped our organization by adopting out a senior kitty whose cost of care was very expensive to the organization.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Belle started showing up (off and on) on my outdoor cameras in November 2019. She would run when I would try to talk to her, but I could tell she was not feral. She had been seen around my neighborhood for months and I’d always receive the same answer when I asked about her: “I think someone is caring for her.” My husband was able to get her to come to him in March 2020 and I scooped her up into a cat carrier and put her in the bathroom adjoining my foster room. The next day, off to the vet she went. The next six months we spent getting her medically stable thanks to Dr. Sanders at Purr and Bark in Raleigh, N.C.

On intake, she was all bones. Her ears were full of yeast, bacteria, and mites and were very painful to her. She was diagnosed with a urinary-tract infection that had likely spread to her kidneys. Her kidney values were high on her bloodwork. She had a leg injury or deformity. She had a mass at the base of her tail that could be infection, could be arthritis. She had thin hair from fleas and lack of nourishment. She was estimated to be 12 years old. She spent two weeks in the vet hospital receiving fluids, antibiotics, ear medication, and TLC. All she did was sleep. The vet and her staff described her as loving and a great patient.

When I brought her home to foster care, I learned how loving she was. She purred non-stop and wanted nothing more than to be near me and sit on my lap or lie on my chest. She got great comfort from a soft bed with a pet heating pad underneath. She drank nearly non-stop and had a good appetite. I told her daily, her ordeal was over, she was no longer unwanted or lost, she was a Carolina Cat now and would be taken care of.

We thought once we had the UTI and other medical conditions resolved, she would either go up for adoption or transport to our partner in New Hampshire for adoption. We have a pretty long wait for elderly pets to get adopted in N.C., but in N.H. they find homes rather quickly.

So she continued getting daily antibiotics, eye drops, and ear drops. She had a pet heating pad to lay her aching body on. She had soft food and plenty of fresh water. Then she went in for her next round of bloodwork and that is when we learned she had hyperthyroidism. Okay, we would get that under control and find her a home. Well, it wasn’t that simple: The hyperthyroidism was masking chronic kidney disease, so we had yet another hurdle to overcome.

After several months of trying various dosages and medications, special food, and bloodwork, and working closely with out vet, we finally found a regimen that works for her. She receives subcutaneous fluids twice a week, B12 injections twice a week, B-complex daily, methimazole twice a day, and prescription renal food. Her bloodwork was finally somewhat stable, although she was still mildly anemic.

Belle had been up for adoption for six months with no interest at the time we applied for the grant. We suspected that the cost of ongoing care was holding back potential adopters. With the funding, we were able to waive her adoption fee and purchase approximately six months worth of food and medical supplies for new family. She was adopted in February and is very happy to be the only pet in her new home.

PALS Animal Life SAvers: Senior Pet Adoption Grants
What was the money or product used for?

The grant money will be used to support the adoptive parents of senior cat Leo for expenses incurred. Leo currently is on a prescription diet (both wet and dry food) as well as medications.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant will assist with the essentials to ensure a happy, healthy life for Leo and his new family.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Leo had been in foster with PALS since February 2020. Leo was surrendered by his family after the addition of a baby to the home. At 10 years old, Leo struggled with the changes in his life, but was always supported by his loving and caring foster parents. Leo experienced several health challenges during his time in foster but is now feeling healthier and more confident. After almost 14 months, his foster family decided that it was time to make it official and adopt Leo. They love him very much and were concerned that another change in his life would be more than he could take. Leo joins three other rescue felines in his new home.

Brooks Animal Protection Society: Cat Enrichment
What was the money or product used for?

We used the Cat Enrichment Grant to purchase cat shelving and climbers for the walls, a new large cat stand, and dishes that attach to the kennels to help us maximize our small space.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped us better utilize our small adoption rooms to provide our cats a space where they can play, have fun, and have more opportunity to socialize with other cats.

The cat climbers and shelving have been so amazing for our cats! They’ve absolutely loved the new space, and have been climbing and sleeping all over the shelves and stand.

The cat kennel dishes have helped us in so many ways! The cats are no longer spilling their water and food in the kennels, and they have more room to move around.

ALL of our cats have been SO happy with the items in this grant! It’s given them more opportunity for exercise, a safe place for them to hang out outside the kennels, and a cleaner place to sleep!!

How many pets did this grant help?

30+ so far

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This grant has really helped our cat Christian (first photo). Christian used to be very scared to be out in the cat adoption room with other cats, as there wasn’t enough room for him to have his own space. Now that we’ve installed the climbers on the walls, Christian has absolutely loved hanging out on his bridge, and it has really started to open him up with other cats. Christian is way more outgoing, and excited to be out of his kennel exploring! Meet Christian here.

Another cat who has greatly benefited from this grant is our beautiful Armstrong (second photo). He tends to get a little rambunctious in his kennel and would often knock over his dishes, leaving his blankets soaked overnight and creating a BIG mess all over his bed. Now that we have the kennel dishes, he has had a bit more room to play, and hasn’t been able to knock over his food and water! Armstrong is a happy boy thanks to these dishes and grant! Meet Armstrong here.