Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

A Pathway to Hope: Purina New Year, New Home
What was the money or product used for?

The funds were used to provide waived or reduced adoption fees for some of our long-term dogs and cats in foster or boarding.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped to get several of our longer-term dogs and cats adopted. We featured some of our adoptables with the reduced fee and were successful in placing several.

How many pets did this grant help?

6

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Taylor (first and second photos) is a sweet, playful girl who was born in foster care with her brother and sisters. She is a purring machine, so happy and content. We knew that Taylor would bring a whole lot of love to a family, but for some reason, this quiet beauty was overlooked for months and months. We featured Taylor with the fact that her adoption fee was sponsored, and she soon found an amazing home. We always say that the longest fosters are just waiting for the perfect home to come along!

Humane Society of Wicomico County: Play Yard Renovation Grant
What was the money or product used for?

We installed a huge outdoor play yard.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We can take 10 to 15 dogs out at the same time for exercise, and they are loving every minute of it. Before, we just had small play yards, and we have turned those into meet-and-greet kennels.

How many pets did this grant help?

40+

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We have a very special girl, Cola (first photo), who is terrified of people but absolutely loves other dogs. She is our go-to girl when it comes to playgroups. She has not gotten her forever home yet, but only because she hasn’t found the right person. Cola says thank you to the Petfinder Foundation. Meet Cola here.

St. Clair County Animal Control: KONG Toy Grant
What was the money or product used for?

We use the Kongs for enrichment purposes for the dogs and the cats in the shelter.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We have a large number of dogs and cats that we cycle through without a large volume of volunteers, making their stimulus time short. By utilizing the Kong toys, we are able to expand their enrichment time with minimal personnel.

How many pets did this grant help?

100 and counting

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We had a dog named Tripp (first and second photos) who was extremely good outside of his cage, but when he was in his kennel and members of the public would walk through, he would bark and jump, not showing well. He also would make a mess out his kennel every time a person would walk by. Before we’d walk families through, we would give him a frozen, filled Kong toy to keep him occupied, and he was adopted within the first week of using that method. He is now happy in his home with a great family and a nice older brother.

Little Shelter Animal Rescue and Adoption Center: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The money was used to purchase a splint and a prosthetic for Daisy.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

After getting her prosthetic, Daisy was able to run around and play like other dogs.

How many pets did this grant help?

one

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Daisy is a 4-year-old shih tzu who arrived from the Animal Care Centers of NYC (ACC). Not much was known about her past except that she was found in a basement, abandoned by her owner, severely matted, injured and crying to be saved.

What they found under matted and dirt-caked fur was heartbreaking. Her right paw was missing, leaving only a forelimb with bone exposed. It’s hard to say if this happened due to the constriction of the matted fur or by some other means, but the wound needed immediate treatment. Daisy’s left paw was also badly damaged. There was a chance her left paw could be salvaged, but it required more resources than the shelter had available. That’s when Little Shelter scooped Daisy up and brought her to Huntington.

Daisy needed a custom splint to correct the damage to her left leg and give her more stability. Once her left leg was corrected, she was able to get fitted for a prosthetic for her right leg that allowed her to be able to play with others and live a normal life. The cost for a custom splint and an orthotic was $1900. Little Shelter thanks the Petfinder Foundation for its generous grant, which helped give Daisy the life she deserves. We are happy to report that Daisy has been adopted.

Friends of the Jefferson Animal Shelter: Petfinder Annual Survey General Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

We have used this grant to provide enrichment for the cats in our adoption center: Cat hammocks, cat beds, toys and cat scratchers for their cages.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It provided enrichment to the cats in our offsite adoption center waiting for forever homes.

How many pets did this grant help?

25

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

The cats love their hammocks and beds, which provide comfort while they are waiting for their forever homes. The cat scratchers for their cages provide them a place to do what comes naturally! And toys are always fun. Having happy, relaxed cats helps them find forever homes! Cats pictured include Willow (first photo). From her Petfinder profile: “This teenage kitten is super sweet and fun-loving. She’s been fostered with cats and dogs.” Meet Willow here.

Animal Aid of Tulsa: Senior Pet Adoption Grants
What was the money or product used for?

Animal Aid received the Senior Pet Adoption Assistance Grant for Theo, a heeler/great Pyrenees mix. We utilized the funds provided to cover Theo’s adoption fee, neuter surgery, and microchipping. We are providing heartworm- and flea-prevention treatment and routine vaccines for four years.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped one of our senior dogs get adopted. Senior dogs are often overlooked when people are searching for a dog, but relieving some of the financial barriers can draw potential candidates’ attention back to these wonderful pets.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We are not sure exactly what happened to Theo before we got him, but it is possible he was hit by a car. It also looked as if he’d had all his teeth removed other than the top canines, which were cut in half. Theo had a dislocated elbow. He also had a severe case of heartworm. He was treated for his trauma-related injuries and heartworm, and a pin was put in his leg. He also participated in physical therapy for several weeks.

Theo has completely beaten the odds against him! He recovered beautifully. His past does not take away from his sweet, loving personality. Theo was recently adopted by an amazing family and is loving life in his new home!

Cooper's Chance Animal Rescue: Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Grant funds were used to purchase enrichment items, toys and treats for our shelter pets to reduce stress and anxiety, helping them to get adopted faster.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant helped us to purchase enrichment items to engage our shelter pets for training, reduce stress and anxiety, and help build trust; this helps the pet to be adoptable faster and transition into a new home more easily.

How many pets did this grant help?

200

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Barkley was surrendered to the shelter after his family moved and couldn’t take him with them. Barkley was devastated, scared and confused when we rescued him and brought him to safety in a loving foster home. The poor guy was shut down, refused even the yummiest of treats and wouldn’t eat regular food. His foster mom began to gain his trust slowly by offering him a Nobbly Wobbly toy stuffed with peanut butter (first photo), which he loved. After a few days, she was able to hand-feed him, and soon he was standing with the rest of the pack eating his kibble, confident and happy. He was adopted by a great family, and he still enjoys peanut-butter stuffing!

Clermont Animal CARE Humane Society: Dogs Playing for Life Mentorship Grant (Invitation Only)
What was the money or product used for?

This grant was used to cover tuition for our Director of Lifesaving Programs, Meaghan Colville, to attend the DPFL Mentorship Program at Longmont Humane Society in May of 2019.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Participating in the DPFL Mentorship Program helped reinforce the notion that Clermont Animal CARE is a progressive shelter committed to implementing best-practice lifesaving programs to enrich the lives of the animals in our care. The addition of the DPFL playgroup program added an important level of enrichment for dogs at the shelter, while simultaneously offering an exciting new, rewarding and advanced-level opportunity for volunteers to engage with the shelter and our animals.

The benefit to our dogs has been immeasurable. Affording them the opportunity to engage in natural dog behavior, learn appropriate dog-to-dog interactions, burn energy and get consistent out-of-cage time has increased the quality of life in the shelter and allowed staff, volunteers and adopters to better know each dog as an individual.

Our commitment to best practices, shelter enrichment, and continuous improvement continues to elevate our status as a regional leader, which helps as we seek other opportunities of funding support, ultimately benefiting the pets in our care.

How many pets did this grant help?

Approximately 75 dogs at our shelter, to date, have been helped by this Petfinder Foundation grant. Additionally, to help launch programs at two large municipal shelters in surrounding counties, we recently trained their staff and volunteers, offering guidance on basic playgroup techniques learned in the class. Given how short-staffed we’ve been, a big challenge for us has been getting the program up and running following Meaghan’s trip to Longmont. We’ve recently hired a Dog Program Manager, however (whom we are hoping to send to a future training!), and have been able to increase our frequency. We also just hired a Volunteer Manager in the past week, so this will help us pull together, train, monitor and manage a dedicated group of volunteers to assist with this enrichment program. Our total dog intake since Meaghan attended training is approximately 400 dogs, and 75 dogs represents about ⅕ of our dog intake during the period June through today. About half of those dogs weren’t eligible for playgroups as they were either on stray hold or another hold (such as medical, behavioral or animal control), were in boarding, or were transferred, adopted or returned-to-owner during their first week, prior to being considered a playgroup candidate. Of our eligible dogs, about half participated in playgroups, some more frequently than others. Participation in the hands-on session most definitely helped propel our program forward and although not as regularly as we would like, we are eagerly anticipating increasing the numbers of dogs benefitting from playgroups. The addition of the Volunteer Manager and Dog Program Manager on staff allows us to begin some focused training and mentorship programs for playgroup volunteers, which will accelerate our implementation and rollout of a more consistent program.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Loki (first photo) was surrendered to us as a dog with a bite history. He bit a repair man in his home where he lived with another small dog. We were told that he was difficult, resource-guarded around people, and didn’t get along with big dogs. When Loki was presented as a candidate for playgroups, staff and volunteers were hesitant and initially declined to let him participate, feeling it was too risky. What if he didn’t like the other dogs, as his owner had said? What if he redirected onto a person if they had to break up a fight? Loki was a tough sell until Meaghan encouraged staff to give him a try.

Getting into playgroups is the best thing that ever happened to Loki! He showed us that he enjoys being around other dogs and does great with people. Through playgroups, we’ve been able to get to know his true personality. He is still awaiting a forever home. You can find Lokii’s Petfinder profile here.

Randolph Regional Animal Shelter: KONG Toy Grant
What was the money or product used for?

We received the XL Extreme Kongs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We stuff/freeze the Kongs to give to our dogs after the shelter closes for the day. This grant was VERY helpful, as the XL Extreme Kongs are the most expensive. We wash/sterilize them daily after use and they last a long time. Giving the dogs the filled Kongs settles them down and keeps them busy for a few hours when they are alone.

How many pets did this grant help?

5

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Boss is a nervous dog when he is not with people. He is also a tough chewer and can only have the XL Extreme Kong. Boss is still up for adoption. From his Petfinder profile: “Boss is an adorable mix with a gorgeous chocolate coat. He is a young boy, probably under a year old. He is currently working with a trainer here at the shelter on his basic commands. He is sweet, gentle, and walks well on a leash. Boss is neutered and up-to-date on vaccinations.” You can meet Boss here.

 

East Bay SPCA: KONG Toy Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The Kong toys were used to enrich the lives of dogs in our shelter.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The dogs in our care greatly benefited from the extra enrichment provided by the Kongs. When dogs were given Kongs, the noise and stress levels in the kennel runs dropped drastically as the dogs worked to get the treats and peanut butter from the Kongs. We are now using these items as part of a regular enrichment program to provide ongoing mental stimulation for the dogs.

How many pets did this grant help?

Since receiving the Kongs, we have had 284 dogs in our care, all of whom have benefited from the additional enrichment.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Jasmine was a very small terrier mix puppy who came into our shelter as a transfer from a municipal shelter partner. She was transferred in with her sibling, who was twice the size she was. We were concerned about her due to her size difference from her sibling and worried that she may have had an underlying medical condition. We sent Jasmine to foster care while she got bigger and was treated for GI issues. She underwent extensive medical testing with us, including bloodwork, full body x-rays, and numerous veterinary exams. We were thrilled to learn that she was fully healthy and just needed some extra time away from her sibling to gain weight and flourish into an adorable, active puppy. When she returned to the shelter from foster care, she was kenneled alone, as her sibling had already been adopted. We were able to provide her with a Kong toy to help occupy her time and ease her transition back into the shelter. Her comfort in her kennel helped showcase her to potential adopters and she has since found her forever family.