Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

Louisa Humane Society: Purina One Senior Pet Adoption Assistance Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The $500 grant for Senior Pet Adoption Assistance specific to our senior German shepherd-mix dog, Jesse, was utilized to support her ongoing supplemental daily medical needs in her new home. The grant will go towards her adoption fee of $150, cost of her spay surgery $150, and monthly regime of supplements/medications cost $180 per month, and possible transportation to approved vendor cost may vary.

Jesse is on a regime supplements to help with anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory. Monthly costs for supplements average $180.00 which include fiber treat, CBD, claritin, glycoflex plus, fortiflora and curcuwell. This does not include the cost of preventatives, flea/tick and heartworm along with food.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Any assistance is greatly appreciated. Most of the senior dogs who come into our care require additional medical attention or special foods in order to assist the new families upon adoption.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Jesse, a 9-year-old German shepherd mix, is a sweet, low-activity dog, approximately 50 to 55 lbs. She has a bad back, and prefers a home with few stairs and rugs or carpeted floors. Jesse gets along with other dogs, though she prefers a home without small dogs or cats. She recently had surgery to remove two mammary tumors, and recovered very well. Jesse loved playing with her beagle foster sibling, taking walks, going on rides, and just being with humans.

She has been placed in a new home. She has a human who is retired, and she continues to follow her around the home. Jesse randomly plays with the toys when the other dogs in the home are sleeping.

MEOW Cat Rescue: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

The grant of $22.50 for Q3 was used to help support medical costs for a kitten who came to us with multiple parasites, ringworm, a very distended tummy, and rapid respiration.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant helped support the medical needs of a very sick kitten.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Cotton was just 7 months old when he and his littermates arrived. All had challenges, but Cotton was the most debilitated. He remained in isolation for months while being treated for multiple medical issues. Now 7 months old, he is big and healthy, being treated long-term only for asthma. Cotton and brother Peter will soon be adopted into a loving and capable forever home.

Outcast Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The grant funds were used to pay for part of Gesa’s hospital stay.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The medical expenses for Gesa were in excess of $6,000. This grant helped us to pay some of the expense fairly quickly.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

In September we saw a video floating around Facebook of a senior gal at a shelter who was clearly suffering. We immediately put out a request for a foster. Gesa, meaning strength and power, was brought to our emergency vet, where she was placed in isolation to be examined. As we suspected, she had pneumonia, but we didn’t expect it was going to be as bad as it was. She had bilateral pneumonia in both lungs and all fields. Her little body was filled with scars and it appeared she’d recently had a litter of pups.

The severe case of pneumonia had developed after she acquired an upper-respiratory infection at the shelter. She spent days in the hospital, dependent on oxygen. After several weeks of antibiotics, nebulizer treatments and rest, we are happy to say that she has fully recovered. She is now in search of her forever home. If you are looking for a middle-aged (7- to 8-year-old) love who enjoys the company of people and other dogs and would do anything for treats, check out our chocolate diva. She will melt your heart like a sweet Hershey’s kiss. Meet Gesa here.

Humane Society for Hamilton County: P.L.A.Y. Pet Beds
What was the money or product used for?

We received $528 worth of P.L.A.Y beds to use for our dogs and cats. These were used to increase comfort and quality of life for our pets.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Since receipt of the beds, HSHC has received 1,014 animals. These animals, and the ones to follow, will benefit from these beds. Following use, we are able to launder the beds and continue use.

How many pets did this grant help?

1014

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Meet Gabriel! As a deaf senior, Gabriel immediately felt out of place at HSHC. When he found comfort, it was in the snuggles of humans and the warmth in his kennel. He especially loved his new bed, curling up and enjoying the new plush bed he had previously not known. We are so grateful for the support of the Petfinder Foundation and their gift. So is Gabriel.

From his Petfinder profile: “Who’s a good boy? Gabriel is! The staff and volunteers at the shelter will tell you how even-tempered and chill he is. Gabriel is 9, neutered and housebroken. And aside from a few freckles on his snout, he’s solid white and gorgeous. He is good with kids and other dogs, so he’d make the perfect family pet! (Gabriel would pretty much make the perfect pet for anyone.) His foster family told us that ‘Gabe’ spent a good amount of time snoozing on the couch with their elderly chihuahua. His other favorite activities were watching their small children play on the floor, sniffing around in the yard and (yes!) going for walks. ‘Gabe is an excellent companion and really loves being around his people,’ says his foster mom. And the shelter’s behaviorist says, ‘Gabriel is just a great dog overall!’ So, what are you waiting for? Come and meet this sweet handsome fella.” Meet Gabriel here.

Tri-County Animal Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Money for this grant was used for Kariann’s amputation surgery and rehabilitation.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

She has made a full recovery and is living her best life! She was adopted one month later to a loving home!

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Kariann is a 3-year-old poodle who has seen the worst and survived. She came to us from China through the Yulin Dog Meat Festival, saved from a meat truck where she was so packed in with other dogs that she broke her leg. When we received her, she was completely bald, covered with scabs and very malnourished. Her leg was shattered in two places and, after several consultations, we were told it had to be removed. We removed her leg thanks to your grant and now she is a happy, loving normal dog! One of our volunteers fell in love with her and she has been adopted.

Iroquois County Animal Rescue: Cat Enrichment
What was the money or product used for?

Funds were used to purchase two types of hide boxes for our caged shelter cats.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant has helped our organization to keep the cats in our care happier, more comfortable and above all, healthier. The hiding boxes reduce the amount of stress that a cat experiences after shelter intake. In the past, this stress typically lead to a cat developing an upper-respiratory infection. The boxes have helped our organization reduce our amount of vet visits needed.

How many pets did this grant help?

It helped/will help a total of 360 cats per year.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Molly, Pippy, and Mildred were all cats who were terrified upon admittance to our shelter. The hide box provided them with a place to feel safe and decompress. Each was able to come out of their box little by little each day at their own pace, until they eventually came to feel comfortable interacting with our staff.

Central Missouri Humane Society: Petfinder Adoption Options in Action Grant (Invitation Only)
What was the money or product used for?

The funds from this grant were used to purchase supplies to support dog playgroups at our shelter. The supplies we purchased were suggested by the professionals at Dogs Playing for Life and included martingale collars, long leashes, air horns, and walkie talkies. We also purchased Gentle Leader halters and basket muzzles for our high-energy dogs who can easily become overstimulated. To avoid resource-guarding, we provided our playgroups with kiddie pools instead of traditional water buckets. We provided each staff member involved in playgroups with a walkie talkie to keep our staff safe and make it easy to call for additional help in the case of an emergency.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant made such a huge difference for the pets in our care! With limited resources, we try our best to provide our animals with enrichment opportunities to keep them both physically and mentally stimulated. After attending the conference, our staff was excited for the opportunity to implement playgroups at our shelter. We had tried playgroups at our shelter before but never with more than three or four dogs at a time. The benefits of playgroups were very apparent, especially after learning more about Dogs Playing for Life at the conference. Since implementing playgroups, we have seen a huge change in our dogs! Stress in the kennels has definitely decreased and the dogs are visibly more relaxed.

Working in a shelter environment, it’s easy to have our guards up and be prepared for the worst to happen. I think that’s why we had been a little apprehensive implementing large playgroups at our shelter before. We always imagined the possibility of a large dogfight breaking out. The people at Dogs Playing for Life made a point to tell us that it’s unlikely for animals of the same species to want to hurt each other. Dogs are social beings and communicate differently than we do and it’s our job to learn how they communicate and offer them freedom and support while in playgroups.

Every dog we have introduced to playgroups has done amazing! Each dog has their own particular play style and we have learned which dogs will do well with others. This program has worked wonders for many of our dogs who were considered “dog reactive” initially. Playgroups allow us to do a much more accurate assessment of their personality and gauge whether they would do well in a home with other dogs. The public also loves watching dogs interact in playgroups and doing so helps them consider dogs they may not have previously considered. We have seen the length of stay decreased for some of our dogs and placed others who had been considered long-term residents.

How many pets did this grant help?

35

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Bailey (first photo) was a 4-month-old German shepherd dog who’d come into our care months earlier. Some kind people had saved her from a bad situation and she was severely under-socialized. For the first couple of weeks in our care, she wouldn’t let any of our staff members even touch her. We sent her to an experienced foster home, but she wouldn’t warm up to strangers coming into the house. Eventually, she came back to the shelter, where we worked with her each day to ease her stranger-danger and make her feel safe with new people.

She was one of the first dogs introduced to playgroups at our shelter and we saw a change in her immediately! She loved being around the other dogs and easily read their body language. She was tolerant and understanding and quickly became a playgroup rockstar. She also started warming up to strangers very easily when in a playgroup setting and back in her kennel. She was the first one to join the playgroup and the last one back to her kennel at the end of the day. For the first time, we saw her hold her ears up in excitement.

After 112 days in our care, Bailey was adopted just a week after first participating in playgroups. The change in her, as with many of our other animals, has been astounding. We are incredibly grateful to have received this grant and look forward to witnessing more success stories each week!

FieldHaven Feline Center: P.L.A.Y. Pet Beds
What was the money or product used for?

We received a supply of P.LA.Y. pet beds for use in our shelter adoption area.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

P.L.A.Y. beds are beneficial in our adoption area. They are attractive and very easy to keep clean. They wash up well, dry quickly and still look great after repeated washings and drying. This is important in a shelter environment because we do have to launder frequently. The P.L.A.Y. beds still look great after dozens of launderings. Oh yes, and most importantly, the cats love them!!

How many pets did this grant help?

In our shelter we typically have 30-40 cats and kittens available for adoption at any given time, so it’s hard to count exactly how many kitties have napped on the P.L.A.Y beds!

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

FieldHaven Feline Center is partnering with the city of Marysville, CA, to TNR the Town. The Marysville High School is an area where there are large colonies of cats and, periodically, tame cats will join a colony. Often they are local resident cats who stop by for a snack but, sadly, sometimes a cat is abandoned at the colony. We think Frannie was one such kitty.

She appeared in the colony in late spring 2019, then started hanging out with the staff at the school-bus maintenance yard. Eventually “hanging out once in a while” turned into her living there.

A search for her people turned up nothing, so the decision was made to bring her to FieldHaven’s adoption program. An exam found her to be about 8 years old, with acute dental disease. She was spayed and had dental surgery. She was found to be FIV-positive, but at FieldHaven that’s no big deal to us. After she recovered from her dental surgery, she was debuted for adoption.

We were perplexed that she wasn’t snapped up for adoption. She was a favorite of our volunteers, who wrote dozens of notes about what a great kitty she is.

One day recently, we discovered why she hadn’t been adopted: She’d been waiting for her perfect family! When the Fetty family came to find an adult cat as a companion for another FieldHaven kitty they had just adopted, it was an instant attraction and Frannie is now snug and happy in her new home.

Thank you for the generous donation of P.L.A.Y. beds to help keep adoptables like Frannie comfy while waiting for families like the Fettys to walk through the door.

The Animal Foundation: Dog Field Trips/Short-Term Fostering Grant
What was the money or product used for?

This grant allowed us to purchase 16 pairs of booties, for $36 each, for our Foster Field Trip program.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Our shelter dogs use these booties when they go on foster field trips. The booties protect our shelter dogs’ feet from the hot Las Vegas pavement and anything else that might hurt their feet.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant has helped 25 dogs so far and will help hundreds more dogs in the future.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

GG, a 6-year-old pit bull-type dog, was at The Animal Foundation waiting to be adopted for more than six months — a long time for a dog to endure the shelter environment. Our Animal Care Team watched as GG’s behavior changed over the months, slowly turning from calm to assertive, an indication that she wasn’t doing well. We knew we had to take action, so we sought out some of our volunteers to take her to the park and spend time with her, to let her be a dog and enjoy life outside of the shelter.

Two volunteers, Kimberly and Julissa, were more than happy to help GG explore and have some outside fun! They spent a few hours walking and seeing the sights at a local park, and then they stopped for a yummy treat, which GG devoured with delight. This simple outing did wonders for GG. Two days after her field trip, she was visited by a potential adopter. GG presented her happy, calm self, which sealed the deal.

After more than six months of waiting, GG was adopted! The booties we were able to purchase gave her access to the outdoors despite the hot pavement, and they will give even more dogs the ability to enjoy foster field trips year-round. Foster field trips contribute to our dogs’ health and wellbeing, which affects their adoptability. Thank you for helping these dogs!

Animal Care Centers of NYC: Dog Field Trips/Short-Term Fostering Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The money is being used to continue outfitting large dogs participating in BoroughBreaks (field trips of several hours), StrayCations (overnight field trips), and even long-term foster placements with well-fitting harnesses. By ensuring dogs leave with harnesses, we enable participants to feel more secure in their ability to manage the dog they are taking into their care. This correlates to getting more large dogs outside of the ACC Care Center and into environments where they are being seen by members of the public. We also purchased treats to help clients navigate around certain behavior issues, and to help dogs focus for better photos, and will be purchasing backpacks that will help participants advertise that their dogs are available for adoption.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

By fitting our animals with appropriate harnesses, and giving participants treats to keep their dogs calm, we’re seeing more large dogs leave for extended breaks. Not only does this provide extra exposure, we also receive incredible photos and information that helps match dogs with their future homes.

How many pets did this grant help?

114 dogs have participated in BoroughBreaks and 29 in StrayCations.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Warrior 80718 participated in a StrayCation on Veteran’s Day. His BoroughBreaker said: “Hello! My husband and I had the immense pleasure of taking Warrior on a BoroughBreak today from the Manhattan ACC. While he definitely could use a little leash training, he was an absolute joy to be around: sweet as can be, loved treats, and sat all morning with us on a picnic blanket in Central Park. We noticed just in the few hours we spent with him that he became more relaxed, and our hearts went out to him after learning he was surrendered a week ago and this has probably been the most confusing few days of his life. He’s also really good at ‘sit!’ He’s just perfect. We took some photos and wanted to share. Thank you to the staff who organize this great program! We also found it ironically suiting that we were paired with ‘Warrior’ on Veteran’s Day and my husband is a vet 🙂 We hope to volunteer again!”

Warrior was adopted the next day.