Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

Last Chance at Life All Breed Animal Rescue and Adoptions: KONG Toy Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The grant was for Kong supplies that were shipped to LCAL.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Our dogs are under a great deal of stress in the kennel setting. High-quality toys like Kongs can provide the mental stimulation and stress relief our dogs need to be successful.

How many pets did this grant help?

10

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Kane was recently transferred from a local rescue. He had been reported as a stray for more than a week before the staff at DAS was able to secure him. When he was brought in, he had a large wound on his rear flank.

The rescue contacted LCAL, as they needed an organization capable of handling Kane’s medical concerns. When Kane was brought to LCAL and received the care he needed, he was very shy and nervous.

The same day Kane arrived, the package from the KONG toy grant arrived and we allowed Kane to relax and pick through the toys. The photo shows Kane with the toy he picked. You can meet Kane here.

RSQ: Bar Dog Operation Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The money was used towards the costs incurred in rescuing Lottie and her puppies (first photo) and 13 other very sick puppies. Lottie was treated for fleas and ticks, had a full dental, and had a pellet removed from her ear. Many of the puppies were treated for parvo, mange, ticks and fleas, and respiratory infections.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant helped offset the costs (food, vet care, meds, cleaning materials, volunteer protective clothing, toys) incurred in the treatment of some very sick dogs. Getting the dogs healthy was imperative to getting them adopted. One puppy did succumb to Parvo, but ALL the others were adopted!

How many pets did this grant help?

19

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Remy (second photo) was one of Lottie’s puppies. RSQ volunteers worked hard to get all the dogs healthy for adoption. Due to their health issues, the dogs had to be quarantined, and volunteers worked tirelessly through the morning into the evening giving them quality care.

Today, Remy is living his best life with his older sister Luna (third photo). He is full of life and is fearless. He enjoys leaping off the couch, herding his sister cats, playing tug-of-war with Luna, and hiking in the desert. Remy also graduated from puppy training at the Modern Pet (fourth photo).

Teddie (photos 5-7) is also one of Lottie’s puppies. According to her adopters, she is the best addition to their little family and has brought them so much joy. She is so smart and they take her with them anywhere they can. “We’re so grateful to RSQ and all that you have done to help bring into our lives! We love her so much!”

Lottie (bottom photo) had many health issues and started having unexplainable seizures. Once Lottie was able to leave the center, her foster took extraordinary care of her and lovingly nursed her back to health and she was adopted.

According to her adopter, she has spunk and her personality has bloomed. Her coat has returned in full. Lottie has a special friend, a small pug-shih tzu mix, and can be a dog without worries now. She is happy, has a great time every day, and can use all of her adopter’s couches and beds. When her adopter is by himself, Lottie keeps him happy. “I have had lots of pets in the past and it’s wonderful to have her in my life.”

Beaver County Humane Society: Dogs Playing for Life Mentorship Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The money awarded from the Dogs Playing for Life Mentorship grant was used to send our Animal Enrichment Manager to attend the Level 1 Mentorship in Longmont, Colorado.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The Dogs Playing for Life Mentorship grant helped our organization by providing hands-on training to the manager of our enrichment department. This training expanded her understanding of the tools and methods of the Dog Playing for Life program.

Since returning from training, our Animal Enrichment Manager has been able to provide training to existing and new staff members on how to conduct playgroups with dogs. Consistent playgroups help to enrich the lives of our dogs by providing same-species engagement and time out of their kennels. They also help the staff to know each dog better in yet another environment so as to be better able to tell the dogs’ stories on our website as well as match them better with adoptive families.

How many pets did this grant help?

We estimate that the Dogs Playing for Life playgroup program at Beaver County Humane Society has helped 82 dogs since our Animal Enrichment Manager returned from training in July, but it will help countless other pets who come into the shelter in the future as our enrichment team puts into action what they have learned.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Aqua (first photo) was a bully-breed dog who arrived at the shelter as a stray on Aug. 24, 2021. We estimated that she was about 3 years old. She was very nervous, but friendly to people. In her kennel, she would shake and vocalize. She tried to dart out the door when her kennel was open and resisted being returned. She was not placated by kennel enrichment items, games, or even people, on occasion.

We were finally able to let her participate in playgroups on her third day at the shelter, and staff met a completely different dog! She came into the yard, took a big lap around, and encouraged all the other dogs to join her. Once she knew playtime would be a normal part of her routine, she was much more willing to engage with staff and rest in her kennel after being able to expend her energy outside.

Playing chase was her favorite game! She would run countless laps around the yard. She liked it best when the other dogs would join in, but she never changed her pace; it was more like a lope than an actual run.

Aqua was adopted on Sept. 26, 2021. A family brought their dog to meet another dog at our shelter, but that dog was not the right fit. Because of Aqua’s time in playgroup, staff knew that she would be a great play match for the family’s dog. The family agreed to meet Aqua at our suggestion. Once we brought her out, she turned on the charm and got the family’s dog to play chase. After spending some more time getting to know Aqua, the family decided that they would take her home that day!

Violet (second photo) was a 2-year-old bully-breed dog who had been transferred to our shelter from another facility on July 15, 2021, where she was described as being reactive with other dogs and not dog-friendly. We included her in playgroups as part of our behavior evaluation. Violet was defensive during her first couple of playgroups but was willing to coexist. Several playgroups later, she started to engage in play with the other dogs.

She was adopted by a family who met her with their dog at an offsite adoption event in late July. We explained the behaviors that were reported to us and what we had observed at our shelter. The family felt comfortable with what they saw during the meet-and-greet and took Violet home.

Two days later, Violet was returned to us because once in the home, she became confrontational with the other dogs. Once Violet was back with us, she resumed participation in playgroups until she was adopted again on Sept. 2, 2021. Even though we knew that we would recommend that Violet be the only dog in the household, we continued to use playgroup as an enrichment tool for her during her time with us, because it provided the most benefit and socialization to her.

Humane Animal Treatment Society: Dog Field Trips/Short-Term Fostering Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The grant funds awarded were used to purchase 12 Easy-Walk dog harnesses, 39 Martingale dog collars, and six “Adopt Me!” leash sleeves. All of the equipment purchased is being used for the Park Pals and Slumber Buddies programs at HATS. These programs provide unique options for offsite enrichment for shelter dogs during their stay.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The items purchased using the grant funds are making it possible to safely send shelter dogs out for walks and stays off-site. Martingale collars offer additional security due to their clasping nature, and the Easy Walk harnesses used in our kennel are secure, easy to use, and comfortable for our canines.

Additionally, the collars and harnesses can both be secured to the leash being used in order to be certain that a shelter dog off-site will not slip off leash. “Adopt Me” leash slips make shelter dogs visible to others. This entices community members to ask questions about the dog, the shelter, the organization, and/or the program that allows the dog off-site for enrichment. The advertisement helps recruit volunteers who would like to contribute, adopters who see a dog that they may be interested in adopting, and donors/supporters who feel strongly about progress being made for shelter dog enrichment.

The Park Pals program at HATS has quickly become a popular option, with great benefits for the dogs, staff, and volunteers. The Slumber Buddies program, which allows dogs off-site for overnight adventures, is also making use of the equipment purchased with this grant.

The supplies keep our shelter dogs safe and visible. The leash sleeves increase visibility and advertise to community members that these pets are available for adoption. As a direct result of these programs being carried out safely and efficiently with new appropriate dog walking equipment, all dogs in our care currently and in the future are and will be benefiting from the exercise, enrichment, and behavior training that these opportunities provide.

How many pets did this grant help?

250

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Penny is a current canine resident at HATS who is looking for her forever home. She is a staff favorite and loves to roll over at a human’s feet for belly rubs. This girl hasn’t had much stability in her life, so she often chooses to submissively belly crawl wherever she needs to go. Thankfully, even though she is a shy girl, going on outings to the park with volunteers has really been helping build her confidence! Slowly but surely and day by day, Penny continues to improve and become more secure and less fearful.

Penny is one of our longest-term canine residents, and we are continuing to use the programs at HATS to challenge her, stretch her comfort zone and prepare her for her perfect forever home. You can meet Penny here.

Austin Boxer Rescue: P.L.A.Y. Pet Beds
What was the money or product used for?

ABR received P.L.A.Y. beds for dogs in our rescue kennel in Hewitt, TX.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The number of ABR boxer rescues has been very high this year, so the population of the ABR kennel has remained over 75%, with many dogs waiting for adoption at the kennel for weeks or months. The ABR kennel is clean and safe, and ABR staff and volunteers provide rescued dogs with great care. Each dog at the kennel has an elevated bed, time outside, and plenty of food and fresh water, but life in the kennel can still be stressful. The Petfinder Foundation’s grant of P.L.A.Y. beds provided ABR kennel dogs with added comfort and security during the journeys to their forever families.

How many pets did this grant help?

14

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Moochie (first photo) is a beautiful, fawn-colored 8-year-old male boxer who has been a resident of the ABR kennel in Hewitt, Texas, since April 2021. Moochie loves all people, but is a little picky about his dog friends, so it’s been difficult to find him a foster home. He would love a forever family to take walks and cuddle with, but while he waits at the kennel, he is much more comfortable with his soft fluffy P.L.A.Y bed from the Petfinder Foundation (second photo). Thank you! You can meet Moochie here.

Solutions for Animals, Inc.: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

Toward direct care for five new intakes whose owner passed away suddenly.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Used for direct care.

How many pets did this grant help?

We are accumulating funds for five animals whose owner suddenly passed away.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

The pets are still in our care. Their owner passed away suddenly. From Facebook, Oct. 17, 2021: “A Pomeranian mix, a poodle, and three beautiful kitties want to thank Haley Dudney for transporting and helping Solutions for Animals make sure they found safety after the passing of their mom. Many times, as in this situation, there is no time and we must urgently come up with a plan to save the animals. It took a team and that team is still providing love and care to these animals in their time of need. Thanks to everyone!”

Paris Animal Welfare Society: Capital Improvement Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Air conditioning unit in our dog kennels

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Our building was built in 1997 and unfortunately, it did not include an air-conditioning unit in the kennels where we house our dogs. During the summer months, we use a ceiling fan and several floor fans, and implement enrichment projects to help keep the dogs cooler, but the area still remains extremely hot.

This grant awarded us $15,000 of a $28,000 project to install an AC unit in our kennel area. With the help of our community raising nearly $13,000, we were able to have it installed. Although we are coming up on the cooler months, the AC unit also allows for a fan to help circulate heat throughout the winter. We can’t wait to utilize it in the summer to keep the pups cool!

How many pets did this grant help?

800+ dogs per year

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Our project was completed later than anticipated (it was finished this past week). Currently we are able to circulate heat throughout our runs using our AC unit’s fan. This will help keep our kennels warm throughout the winter for dogs like this hound momma and her single puppy! In the summer, our moms and pups will be able to remain cool and comfortable in the AC! Thank you, Petfinder Foundation! (Mom and pup are not available yet as the pup is only 2 weeks old.)

Homes Fur Hounds, Inc.: Senior Pet Adoption Grants
What was the money or product used for?

The funding we received is being used for potential adopters to offset Rufus’s adoption fee and to purchase food and other items needed to set up a home for a new dog, as well offsetting some of his ongoing medical costs, such as his eye medication and the ear drops he needs for his chronic otitis media.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Finding a home for a senior, blind and deaf dog requiring ongoing medical treatment is no easy task. Adopters are very aware of the costs involved in his care. With the grant, we can offer to offset these expenses, making it more likely that Rufus will be adopted. Although his foster parents love him and would keep him, if he is adopted, it will free up resources, including the foster home and financial resources, so that we can take in another needy dog.

How many pets did this grant help?

Two: Both Rufus and the dog that we will be able to take in once Rufus is adopted.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Rufus is a very special boy who’s had a rough life. We found him in a very crowded shelter, where he’d had no interest from any adopters. He has limited sight, is deaf, and his back legs are a bit wobbly. The vet suspects it could be due to a combination of atrophy from poor care and/or a possible old spinal injury.

Despite this, Rufus does get around fairly well. Because of his wobbly legs and limited sight, he probably needs few or no stairs in his new home or an owner who is able to carefully pick him up to help him navigate stairs. His limitations make it difficult to find a home for him.

We are grateful we were able to pull him into our rescue. This grant will go a long way toward offsetting the financial concerns many have associated with the prospect of adopting a senior dog. Rufus has not been adopted yet, but we’re hopeful! Here is the link to his profile.

Louisiana SPCA: P.L.A.Y. Pet Beds
What was the money or product used for?

The in-kind donation of P.L.A.Y. pet beds from the Petfinder Foundation was used to replace unsuitable beds for the animals at our Plaquemines Parish campus. These beds replaced beds that were ripped, had broken pieces, and were no longer providing comfort for the animals in our care.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped our organization by increasing our capacity to care for homeless animals. As the sheltering organization for both Orleans and Plaquemines Parishes, we strive to provide the best care possible to the animals, including a comfortable bed to sleep on while they’re in our care. However, when we began operating the animal shelter for Plaquemines Parish on January 1, 2020, we found that a lot of the old, deteriorating furniture and supplies needed to be replaced. This grant helped us replace some of the beds at that facility, which sees more than 1,000 animals annually.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant helped the more than 150 animals who have come into our care since we received the beds on July 29, 2021.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Fester is an 11-year-old hound mix who was found roaming in Plaquemines Parish for several days after Hurricane Ida hit Southeast Louisiana. He was brought to our shelter but no one came to claim him. Despite his age, he’s got plenty of energy, but will snuggle on his P.L.A.Y bed when the time comes. You can meet Fester here.

Spokane Humane Society: KONG Toy Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The Kong products were used for new dogs arriving at our shelter.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It helped the newly arrived dogs focus on something inside of their kennel instead of barking at all of the activity around them. This provided a calmer environment for all the dogs in our care.

How many pets did this grant help?

250

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Good Time Charlie (first photo), now named Sir Charles, traveled to Spokane from Texas. In that shelter, he had run out of time, even though he was described as a dog who loves attention from everyone and was good with kids and other dogs. He walked well on a leash and kenneled okay, too!

After two weeks, he was adopted by a family who said he was “meant to be with” the family and he had really bonded with their youngest daughter.