Posts Tagged: SNAP-X

Our New Rescue Van Will Save Lives in Detroit!

MHS_van_collage2Here’s a sneak peak at the new animal-rescue van purchased with our $40,000 grant to the Michigan Humane Society! With this van, MHS will be able to save thousands of Detroit animals from cruelty and neglect.

“Thank you for the time you took to help MHS with this and for the significant donation that made this possible,” says MHS Vice President of Development Marta Diffen. “Animals in the city are counting on us and we are truly grateful!”

The vehicle will enable MHS cruelty investigators to save more pets like Zeva, a German shepherd puppy found wandering the streets of Detroit so emaciated and weak that she was walking on her wrists — her paws were not strong enough to support her body.

Zeva was treated at MHS’s Detroit Center for Animal Care, then fostered — and ultimately adopted — by MHS Chief Cruelty Investigator Debby MacDonald. See Zeva’s amazing transformation in the video below.

Donate now to help more pets like Zeva.

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Happy Ending for Detroit Puppy With Two Broken Legs

Thanks to a Petfinder Foundation grant, the Michigan Humane Society has purchased a new rescue van to save abused and injured animals in the beleaguered city.

“This generous gift from the Petfinder Foundation will travel thousands of miles each year to rescue animals in need,” says MHS’s Interim President and CEO, David A. Williams. “The Petfinder Foundation will help us save the very lives we may then re-home using the most widely recognized website that has placed millions of animals, Petfinder.com. We are grateful for such a great partner. The support is vital and very much appreciated.”

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At this Detroit home, Flutter fell from the second-floor porch onto the concrete patio below.

The $40,000 grant, part of our SNAP-X Detroit project, will mean more help for abused and injured animals like Flutter, a puppy rescued after falling from a second-floor porch.

Flutter’s owner called the MHS Rescue Department the day after the 4-month-old German shepherd mix fell off the porch.

Once at the shelter, it was clear that Flutter was in terrible pain and could not put weight on either of her front legs. X-rays confirmed that she had broken both legs.

Vets outfitted her with two pretty pink casts, and she went into a foster home — with Stacey Bean, the rescue driver who’d saved her! A few months later, after Flutter had made a full recovery, her story was featured on the local news, and she was immediately adopted by Esther Martinez, who’d already adopted two dogs from MHS. “She was just adorable, and I loved her from the moment I saw her,” Martinez told MHS. Watch a video on Flutter’s adoption.

Donate now to help more pets like Flutter.

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In Detroit, a Former Outside Dog Finds a Place on the Couch

Our SNAP-X Detroit grant program continues to save the lives of the city’s most at-risk pets. As part of the effort, we gave a $10,000 grant to All About Animals Rescue, which operates in some of Detroit’s lowest-income zip codes.

AAAR forges relationships with area pet owners — many of whom keep their dogs outside — providing pet food, veterinary care and supplies such as collars and straw to improve the dogs’ quality of life, all while educating the owners in an effort to get them to bring their pets indoors. If they refuse, AAAR offers to rehome the dogs.

Spenser was one such outside dog. AAAR founder Amber Sitko tells us Spenser’s story in pictures:

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The handsome boy on the couch is Spenser. He used to be known as Scarface. His owner disappeared and the owners’ roommates allowed Spenser to stay, but life didn’t get any better for him.

 

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This is where Spenser lived. The roommates weren’t so interested in feeding Spenser, so he had daily rescue visits until a foster home could be found.

 

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Finally, AAAR found Spenser a loving foster home, where he had a playmate! Sadly, he also tested positive for heartworm.

 

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Spencer’s foster mom agreed to continue fostering him until after treatment. During that time, she fell in love with him and decided to adopt him! He tested negative last month too, so all good things with Spencer!

 

Donate now to help more pets like Spenser.

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A New Van to Rescue Cruelty Victims in Detroit

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Edgar was left in a garbage can to die. MHS cruelty investigators saved his life.

One sad result of Detroit’s bankruptcy has been that animal cruelty victims are more vulnerable than ever. With massive cuts to Animal Control, the city agency is unable to respond to many of the calls it receives, and animal shelters and rescue groups are scrambling to fill in the gaps.

As part of our SNAP-X program to help Detroit’s pets, the Petfinder Foundation has given a cash grant of $40,000 to the Michigan Humane Society to purchase a second animal-rescue vehicle, meaning MHS will be able to help more pets like Edgar, who was left in a garbage can after prolonged and severe neglect.

On March 9, a passerby walking his dog heard whimpering coming from a trash can and discovered the dog. The man called MHS, and when its cruelty investigators arrived on the scene they found the 4-year-old Maltese mix in the garbage can, the handle of a plastic bag twisted around his neck.

Rescuers rushed the dog to MHS’s Detroit Center for Animal Care, where vets saw that he was covered with severe urine burns — meaning he’d probably been confined in a small space for a long time before he was finally discarded like trash.

Today, the dog, who has been named Edgar, is in a loving foster home and improving every day. The MHS Cruelty Investigation Department is offering a $2,500 reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person or people responsible for his deplorable treatment.

Helping More Pets Like Edgar
Our $40,000 grant funds a fully-equipped animal-rescue vehicle that will enable MHS workers to get even more pets like Edgar out of abusive situations. The organization’s Marta Diffen explains why it’s so desperately needed:

“With Detroit Animal Control hobbled by a variety of factors, our cruelty calls have increased by 26% since 2011 and our rescue calls are up nearly 30%. Our miles driven are up 12%. We expect this trend to continue while the city goes through bankruptcy.

“A new van is paramount to meeting this increasing demand. With Detroit Animal Control not responding to calls regarding stray animals, we are dispatching drivers and rescuing animals from the streets multiple times a day. The wear and tear on the rescue vans is where we are seeing the biggest challenge. Increased miles and carrying more animals is resulting in significant wear to the vehicles and the kenneling equipment.”

Edgar4UPDATE – April 9, 2014: Today, exactly one month after Edgar’s rescue, the Michigan Humane Society posted the photo of him at right on its Facebook page and reported, “Edgar, the Maltese mix who was found in a trash can, is recovering well in foster with MHS cruelty investigator Mark Ramos. Look how cozy he looks on his bed!” We love Edgar’s adorable underbite.

UPDATE – April 16, 2014: Edgar went to his forever home today! Adopter Cindy Nelson-Pouget told MHS, “Something was just pulling at my heart, saying, ‘You need to go get this dog.'” Check out Edgar and his new mom in the video below. Congratulations, Edgar and Cindy!

Read more about how we’re helping pets in Detroit.

Donate now to help more pets like Edgar.

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Helping Desperate Pets in a Bankrupt Detroit

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Junior was helped thanks to our grant to All About Animals Rescue.

The economic downturn has been devastating for residents of Detroit, and their pets. While residents have struggled to stay afloat — or fled the city altogether — animal control services have been drastically cut in the wake of the city’s declaration of bankruptcy in July 2013.

Thanks to our SNAP-X program, founded by animal advocate Fabiola Beracasa, a generous donation from Animal Planet’s R.O.A.R. campaign, and donors like you, we’re working to help these vulnerable pets.

With Detroit Animal Control no longer adopting out pets to the public, homeless pets are dependent on the private shelters and rescue groups that pull from the shelter. We’ve given sizable cash grants to two of them: All About Animals Rescue and Michigan Humane Society.

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Mona on the day AAAR volunteers met her

All About Animals Rescue (AAAR) not only finds new homes for pets in need — it also operates the largest high-quality, high-volume, low-cost to no-cost spay/neuter and vet care operation in Michigan. AAAR has spayed or neutered more than 80,000 cats and dogs and provides free health screenings, low-cost vaccines and preventative care to more than 50,000 Detroit-area pets each year.

AAR’s volunteers also pound the pavement year-round, working with residents of some of Detroit’s lowest-income zip codes to help people keep their pets, bring chained pets into their homes and generally improve their pets’ quality of life.

The group’s founder and president, Amber Sitko, tells us about two of the dogs helped by our grant:

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Mona (left) and Junior were grateful for food, water, real collars and basic veterinary care.

“At an outreach event, we met a homeless man living in a filthy camper shell on a vacant lot. It didn’t take long to realize that he had a mental illness and a drinking problem. He had found Mona and Junior wandering the streets and was afraid someone would use them as bait dogs, so he said he chained them up on his lot.

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Mona greets an AAAR volunteer.

“Somewhere along the line, Junior was lucky enough to get a dog house. Mona had part of a wood box. Not having adequate shelter and being chained is bad enough, but he would forget to feed them and said he didn’t really have the money to get them food anyway. When he remembered, he said he’d share some of his food.

“Our first order of business was getting them watered/fed, real collars on them so chains weren’t rubbing against their necks, better shelter, and a vet call.

“It didn’t take long for Mona and Junior to find a rescue visit the highlight of their day.

“It took longer to get them to a place where they could run free and just be dogs. But they’re finally safe and happier than they’ve ever been before.”

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Junior and Mona today (pictured at right with AAAR Detroit team leader Kristen Huston): safe, happy and healthy

UPDATE: Sitko tells us, “Mona was adopted by a great guy who owns a tattoo shop. She will be going to the shop with him as soon as she’s more confident around strangers.” Junior is safely in the care of another rescue group.

Stay tuned for more stories of Detroit pets helped by our SNAP-X grant and your support. Donate now to help more pets like Mona and Junior.

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SNAP-X Grant Helps Puppy Mill Survivor Find Her Home

Our SNAP-X grant helped Hannah, a puppy mill survivor, find a loving home.

Our SNAP-X grant helped Hannah, a puppy mill survivor, find a loving home.

We’ve received another update from Maple Hill Farm Toy Breed Rescue in Butler, Ohio, about how our SNAP-X grant helped save Hannah, a 5-year-old Chihuahua, from a puppy mill where she had lived without attention, love and vet care.

President Dawn Porter told us back in May that she was having Hannah spayed and fully vetted with the grant funds. Now Porter says:

“Here is another dog adopted on Sunday thanks to the grant allowing her adoption fee to be lower.

“Hannah found the perfect home with a senior gentleman who needed another dog to love. She was a very fearful one that needed just the right home!”

Our SNAP-X helped pay for Hannah's spay surgery and find her a home.

Our SNAP-X grant helped pay for Hannah‘s spay surgery and find her a home.

Learn more about Maple Hill Farm Toy Breed Rescue’s work with puppy mill survivors.

Donate to help us save more dogs like Hannah.

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Little Boy Finds a New Home Thanks to Our SNAP-X Grant

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Little Boy

Cheryl Conway from Aurora Animal Shelter in Aurora, Col., which received our SNAP-X spay/neuter grant, shared with us how one of the pets who benefited from the grant, a cat named Little Boy, found his new home, as told to her by his adopters:

“Our new little boy caught my heart with his sweet little face. He was eager to be petted and climbed into my arms the moment I opened his cage. The way he grabbed my fingers and pulled them to kiss them was the final straw. He snuggled in my arms, purring and content, and I was sold.

Vicki Medina and her new “Little Boy”

Adopter Vicki Medina and Little Boy

“We came back to visit him for three days. He came home with us the third day. We are happy to have him join our family!”

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SNAP-X Grants Save Large-Breed Dogs Nationwide

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Dixie with a favorite toy

Here are updates from three shelters who received our SNAP-X spay/neuter grants.

Dixie, a pit pull mix in Florida
Sarah Humlie, managing director of the Humane Society of Pensacola, tells us about a timid pit mix:

“We operate a no-kill shelter in an area where the county animal shelter euthanizes approximately 3,000 dogs every year. A large portion of those dogs are bully breeds and pit mixes, due to the difficulty of finding suitable adoptable homes for those breeds. With the help of this grant, we were able to transfer two pit-mix mothers, with their litters of puppies (14 total!), from the county shelter to our facility, where they were able to receive the time they needed to wean their puppies and be adopted into loving homes.

“One of the mothers, Dixie, was a very timid pit bull-Lab mix. When she first arrived at the Humane Society, she wouldn’t walk on a leash at all, only lie down, and she had to be carried everywhere in order to go the bathroom, play in the yard, or go to the vet. At the time of transfer, she was very pregnant, and within a week she gave birth to nine healthy puppies!

“Dixie stayed with a wonderful foster family while she nursed and weaned the puppies. They brought her out of her shell, housetrained her, and taught her how to play fetch. Now, you will never find her without a favorite toy in her mouth. She is still learning how to walk on a leash, but with her new, trusted owner, she has made remarkable progress. Thanks to funding through this grant, Dixie, only a year and a half old, was able to be spayed and adopted to a wonderful home!”

Dottie, a Doberman in Nevada

Dottie when she was rescued

Dottie when she was rescued

Pat Getter, president of Doberman Rescue of Nevada in Las Vegas, sends us the story of a Doberman who couldn’t stand up:

Dottie, a young female Doberman stray, was picked up by animal control and taken to a Southern California shelter where she wouldn’t get up in her crate. She was sweet and friendly and apparently had just weaned a litter of pups. But if the shelter couldn’t get her to stand, let alone walk, they would put her down. Nothing showed up on the X-rays, so vets didn’t know what to treat. Could it be Wobbler syndrome? Could it be a cruciate [knee] injury? A shelter volunteer got the word out to local rescue groups, who then spread the word throughout the western Doberman-rescue network.

Dottie, smiling today

Dottie, smiling today

“With the wheels in motion to try to find a rescue group to pull her, the shelter gave her time, and Tuesday was now Thursday. By Friday, this black-and-tan beauty was a little stronger. And by Saturday, she was standing when DRNV’s volunteer came to see her and make arrangements to pull her on Tuesday to bring her to Las Vegas.

“The shelter vet joked that maybe she heard all the commotion about being euthanized and she realized she needed to stand up for herself – literally. Or perhaps, she simply had a badly bruised leg – maybe she’d been hit by a car – and needed a few days for the soreness to subside. But when she arrived in Las Vegas to be spayed, she was up and around, walking on all fours, and you would have never known this was the same Dober-girl who, one week earlier, was nearly put down just because she couldn’t get up.

“She is now spayed and ready to find her forever home. We posted her photo on our Facebook page while she was in transport and we already had an applicant by the time she arrived in her new city – before we even posted her on our own website or Petfinder! Plus a possible adopter from our list of already approved applicants. So life is finally looking up for Dottie and she should be in her forever home soon. A meet-and-greet is set for this weekend. All paws are crossed!”

Our SNAP-X grant made Dottie’s rescue possible, Getter says: “We appreciate it more than you can ever know. Our Dobie boys and girls give you paws up for your generosity and support!”

Leah, a pit bull in Wyoming

Leah with her new family

Leah with her new family

Britney Wallesch, founder of Black Dog Animal Rescue, Inc., in Cheyenne, WY, tells us about an emaciated, but still friendly, pit bull:

“Spay and neuter surgeries are by far the largest recurring expense we currently have. By providing money for this purpose, the grant allowed us to allocate other funds to program services that are lower on the priority list but also badly needed. We believe that all animals should be spayed or neutered prior to adoption and by doing so we are helping them to go onto happier, healthier lives with their new families.

“Leah was a 2-year-old blue pit bull-type dog who came to us from a shelter in one of the largest communities in Wyoming. She was emaciated and had stayed too long in a kennel. But, in true bully style, she was all kisses and wiggles for everyone she met. Like many other communities across the country, Wyoming’s shelters are faced with handling an abundance of pit bull and pit bull-mix dogs. As a result, a greater number of them face euthanasia every year.

“Leah was one of the lucky ones and she got to come to Black Dog Animal Rescue for safety. She was spayed thanks in part to funding from the SNAP-X grant and gained weight well. She overcame some initial shyness and became a great snuggle buddy for her foster siblings. Leah traveled to New York State over the summer with her foster family, where she learned to run of-leash and that she loves to swim! Upon her return from the family vacation, Leah was quickly adopted by a local veterinarian and her family. Don’t be deterred by her serious expression — she never did learn to love the camera. But rest assured, she has found a happy, forever home. She was the 134th adoption in our Summer Adopt-a-thon.”

Donate to help us save more pets, and Orvis will match your gift!

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SNAP-X Grants Help Rural Pets Find Homes Faster

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Clockwise from top left: Miss Kaye, Heidi, Kurt Russell and Katie

We got these reports from two recipients of our SNAP-X spay/neuter grants.

Patricia Beam, director of Mitchell County Animal Rescue in Spruce Pine, N.C., writes:

“Thanks so much for the Petfinder Foundation grant. We have used it to spay/neuter our shelter animals. Miss Kaye was a stray. An out-of-state adopter walked in the door and said he was here to adopt her based on her profile on Petfinder.com. Heidi was a stray kitten whom we were able to quickly get spayed and into her new home. Kurt Russell could jump three feet high flat-footed. He was adopted off Petfinder and fixed with the Petfinder Foundation grant funds. Katie was born in a ditch and her mother was feral. She and her five littermates were all fixed with the grant money and all were quickly adopted. Petfinder is an animal shelter pet’s best friend!”

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Cassidy with his new mom

Pat Getter, president of Doberman Rescue of Nevada in Las Vegas, tells us about one dog who was neutered thanks to our SNAP-X grant:

“An 11-month-old Doberman was brought to an animal hospital and the owners asked the vet to euthanize him — they said he was showing residual signs of parvo he supposedly previously had. The vet examined the dog, asked some questions, and basically determined that he was a healthy, energetic puppy who did not deserve to die because the irresponsible owners had no clue how to handle him. The vet asked the owners to surrender the dog to the animal hospital, which they did.

“The vet got the medical records from the owners’ previous vet clinic and the clinic said the owners told them the puppy ‘had parvo last week’ so it was never documented by any identifiable veterinarian that the dog had been sick or treated. Vet No. 1 did some additional testing, including an ECG when they thought they might have detected a slight arrhythmia, but the test came back normal. So, once the puppy had a clean bill of health, they called Doberman Rescue of Nevada and asked if we would be able to find a home for this Doberman.

“We were happy to help. Vet No. 1 proceeded with the puppy’s neuter. DRNV was only charged for the neuter and not any of the additional testing.

“Once we posted a photo of Cassidy, we received more than a dozen applications. We are particularly diligent when we have a young, classic-looking Doberman — black and tan, cropped and docked — because it is considered the breed standard and people come out of the woodwork wanting one, many of whom are not qualified to adopt and some of whom want Dobermans for the wrong reasons.

“We ultimately selected a woman who was raised with many dogs growing up, including Dobermans, worked in kennels as a teenager and is dedicated to not only loving and nurturing the boy, but giving Cassidy the obedience training he needs right away at this developmental age to turn him into the fine Doberman he can be.”

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These Abandoned Puppies Won’t Be having Puppies!

Adopted Pit Bull Allie in her new home

Adopted Pit Bull Allie in her new home

Thanks to our SNAP-X (Spay, Neuter, Adopt, Protect) grant, some pit bull puppies who were abandoned at the Humane Society of Pensacola in Florida won’t be having puppies of their own.

The shelter applied for a SNAP-X grant to help with the county’s problem with an overabundance of that breed, writing, “We would use the funds to spay the pit bulls and pit bull mixes that we see so often in our shelter.”

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Mama dog Angel‘s pups as newborns

Luckily, the grant funds had arrived the day an entire Pit Bull family was left at the facility — mama dog Angel, her mate and their four newborn pups. All six dogs “were abandoned on our porch with a note,” the shelter’s managing director, Sarah Humlie, tells us.

“Dad has been adopted,” she adds. “Mom is still waiting for her forever home, and all of the puppies have gone to great new homes.

“The puppies were beautiful and well behaved. By 10 weeks old, Bane knew how to sit, shake and roll over! Allie, as you can see from the picture, is a sweet girl without a care in the world in her new home. Both of these puppies were able to be spayed and neutered with the help of the grant.”

Bane in his new home

Bane in his new home

The pups’ mama, Angel, “loves to play, is a delight to be around, and will bring a smile to any face,” according to her Petfinder profile. Learn about adopting Angel here.

A SNAP-X grant also helped a dog named Sherman, who was in the care of Maple Hill Farm Toy Breed Rescue in Butler, Ohio.

Maple Hill president Dawn Porter tells us, “Sherman was a dog sent to us by a lady from Shelby. She found him and tried to find a home for him but could find no one, so she sent him to us. He is a poodle mix — we felt even possibly part Chinese crested. [A couple] came to adopt Laura; they liked her but then saw Sherman and the husband could not stop loving on him. So they ended up deciding to adopt him instead!”

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Thanks to program founder Fabiola Beracasa and everyone who donated to make these SNAP-X grants possible!

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