Posts Categorized: Grants

These Four Dogs Were Suffering — Until You Helped

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Cindy before surgery (left) and in her new home


Your donations to the Petfinder Foundation’s Emergency Medical Fund help hundreds of sick, injured and abused homeless pets every year. Here are four of the most recent:

Cindy
As a young puppy, Cindy’s leg was badly injured (she may have been hit by a car). Rather than seeking proper treatment, her owner chose to apply a homemade splint. This caused her leg to become permanently deformed, making it difficult for her to sit, stand and walk and causing permanent pain. Our grant to Homeless Animal Rescue Team in Virginia paid for Cindy’s amputation surgery, and today, Cindy is happy, healthy, and living the good life with her doggy brother in her forever home! Read her story.

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Vladimir has made a full recovery


Vladimir
This 1-year-old Siberian husky was hit by a car on a major highway in San Antonio. Rescued by Molino de Suenos/Windmill of Dreams Animal Rescue and Sanctuary in Texas, he was taken to a veterinary clinic and x-rays showed multiple fractures in his leg. Our grant paid for his much-needed orthopedic surgery. Vladimir had 100% recovery of his leg function and has been adopted. Read his story.

pixie

Pixie is loving her pain-free life in her new home


Pixie
When Pixie came to the Roanoke Valley SPCA in Virginia, she refused to walk. X-rays revealed that her leg had been broken and had tried to heal without treatment. Thanks to our grant, the shelter was able to pay for amputation surgery and placed Pixie in a foster home to recover. After weeks of healing, Pixie’s foster family realized they had fallen in love with her so much that they had to adopt her. Pixie is now part of a loving family that spoils her rotten! Read her story.

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Barney is loved by his new family


Barney
Barney was surrendered to Georgia Pet T.A.I.L.S. after his owner left him on a cable tie-out during the day. The cable got caught wrapped around his back legs. He was left like that for so long that the circulation was cut off nearly the entire day to both rear legs. Our grant enabled the rescue to provide Barney with two surgeries and several skin grafts, and today he is a healthy, happy boy who has recently been adopted! Read his story.

Thank you so much for all your support, which allows us to save these pets and many others like them!

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Abused & Injured, They’re SAFE Now Thanks to YOU

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Gemma at the vet (left) and headed to her new home


Every day, our Emergency Medical Fund helps save pets who have been terribly abused, injured and neglected, getting them critical medical care so that they can find loving, forever homes.

These are just a few pets helped by your donation recently:

Gemma
In April, the Berea Animal Rescue Fund in Ohio received a call that a puppy had been brought into a local vet’s office after a family member strangled her for having an accident in the house. The puppy was close to death and the family, unwilling to pay for her treatment, wanted to have her euthanized. Berea ARF rescued the pup and, with help from a Petfinder Foundation grant, got Gemma the x-rays, oxygen therapy, and antibiotics she needed to survive. Gemma made a full recovery and was adopted by her loving foster mom. Read her full story.

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Rosie before her surgery (left) and after


Rosie
Our grant to New Leash on Life USA in Pennsylvania provided much-needed relief to Rosie, whose ears had been crudely and cruelly cropped and stitched with fishing wire before she ended up at a crowded Philadelphia shelter. Despite regular cleaning, Rosie’s ears were chronically inflamed and infected due to fluid trapped within scar tissue. Surgery removed her remaining ear tissue, and Rosie is now pain-free, recovering well and serving as the organization’s ambassador dog, teaching children and adults about dogs’ resilient spirits. Read Rosie’s story.

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Fonzie after surgery (left) and with his new mom


Fonzie
The 3-month-old beagle was found in a cemetery, where he’d been living for at least two weeks, abandoned with a badly broken hind leg. Forever Friends Humane Society in Oklahoma picked him up and, thanks to a Petfinder Foundation grant, was able to bring him to the vet for surgery immediately. Fonzie was quickly adopted and his new family followed all his recovery instructions. He now leads a normal, happy life with a wonderful family that loves him dearly! Read his full story.

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Daryl after surgery (left) and with his new mom


Daryl
In January, a good Samaritan came across a stray cat who’d been hit by a car and was badly injured, a bone protruding from his hind leg. His rescuer took him to Pets Alive in Middletown, N.Y., which immedately brought him to a veterinary hospital. Sadly, Daryl had a compound fracture and doctors could not save his leg, but thanks to a Petfinder Foundation grant, he got the surgery he needed. He made a full recovery and soon captured the heart of a family, who report that he’s a playful and energetic companion, “even with just three legs!” Read Daryl’s story.

So many pets like these can only get a chance at happy lives with expensive medical intervention, and your donations make these treatments possible. Thank you again for helping the most vulnerable homeless pets.

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These Pets Are Happy & Healthy – Thanks to YOU!

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Shadow was emaciated and nearly hairless


Our Emergency Medical Fund grants are often the difference between life and death for homeless pets with medical conditions that render them unadoptable. Here are just a few of the pets who were helped thanks to donors like you:

Shadow
When the schnauzer mix (pictured above) arrived at Broome County Humane Society in New York State, she was emaciated, infested with fleas and parasites, and nearly hairless. Our grant got her on the road to healing, and her loving foster mom, who saw Shadow through her rehabilitation, has decided to adopt her! Read Shadow’s story.

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Martha had been shot in the face with a BB gun


Martha
The sweet 3-year-old stray was found by Animal Control with multiple pellet wounds to her face. Rescued by Half the Way Home cat rescue in Georgia, her face continued to swell even after the pellets had been removed. Our grant helped pay for her testing and care; today she is doing much better and will never know suffering again. Read Martha’s story.

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Wesley will soon be walking on all four legs!


Wesley
Bred for racing, the greyhound injured a growth plate in his right tibia as a puppy and grew up with a deformed leg. His owner realized Wesley would never race and asked Ohio’s American Lurcher Rescue Project to find him a good home. Our grant helped pay for surgery and Wesley is now recovering, with several families hoping to adopt him. Best of all, he’ll soon be running on all fours for the first time in his life. Read Wesley’s story.

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Therapy and a brace are helping Diesel walk again


Diesel
Diesel’s owners left him outside for over a week while they were out of town. Scared and alone, the young border collie mix jumped a 30′ wall and shattered his right rear leg and left front leg. When his owners found out what happened, they refused to pay his veterinary bills and surrendered him to St. Louis Senior Dog Project, where he underwent surgery and extensive physical therapy. Our grant funded a custom orthopedic brace that finally lets the energetic pup go for the long walks he loves. Read Diesel’s story.

Your donations help us ease these and many other pets’ suffering. From all of us at the Petfinder Foundation, thank you for everything you do to help pets in need.

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Reggie, Wayne, Rutley & Bobo: You Helped Them All!

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Reggie before his surgery (left) and today

If you donated to support the Petfinder Foundation’s Emergency Medical Fund, you know that your gift, and the fund, have helped hundreds of homeless pets in need of lifesaving veterinary care. We thought you’d like to meet a few of them.

Reggie
The 1-year-old Australian shepherd (pictured above) was unable to bear any weight on his leg when he was picked up as a stray. An MRI showed that Reggie had a bone fragment in his elbow, and had developed arthritis so severe that the leg would never be pain-free. Our grant enabled Speak St. Louis in Collinsville, IL, to get Reggie’s injured leg amputated. He recovered beautifully and he is currently living a happy life with a wonderful family and Aussie sister. Read more about Reggie.

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Wayne with injured hind legs (left) and today

Wayne
Cats Meow Feline Fosters in Morehead, KY, was called to pick up a stray cat living in a trailer park who couldn’t use his back legs. X-rays revealed that one leg was dislocated and the other was broken, and the cat needed surgery to pin the bones back together. Our grant allowed the rescue group to get this surgery for the good-natured cat, now named Wayne, and he’s since been cleared for unlimited activity. Wayne enjoys running, playing, and even some climbing, and is ready for a forever home! Read Wayne’s story.

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Rutley’s infected ear (left) and Rutley now

Rutley
Mr. Rogers, now named Rutley, was dumped in the overnight drop box of a Southern California shelter in horrific condition: The 9-year-old dog had a large, open tumor on his ear that was infected and infested with maggots. Although he was in terrible pain, he still wagged his tail when he was rescued by Camp Cocker Rescue in Sherman Oaks, CA. Our grant allowed the group to get his tumors removed, and Rutley now enjoys going to the beach and chasing balls at his adoring forever home. Read more about Rutley.

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Bobo soon after surgery (left) and today

Bobo
The Humane Society of McCormick County in South Carolina received a call about a dog found with sticks duct-taped to his front leg. They found a friendly dog, now named Bobo, who was struggling to walk, the skin wearing away on his paw from being dragged on the ground. Shelter vets diagnosed him with brachial plexus avulsion, caused when the limb is pulled so hard that the nerves are yanked out of the spinal cord. Our grant enabled the shelter to get Bobo’s leg amputated, and he is now walking (and feeling) much better. This friendly boy is ready to be adopted! Read his story.

It’s thanks to your support that these sweet pets are no longer suffering and are looking forward to long lives in loving homes. Please help us continue this lifesaving work, and thank you again from all the pets you’ve helped!

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Our Favorite Stories from 2017

Every time we give a grant to a shelter or rescue group, we ask for a report detailing how they used the funds and telling us the story of an individual pet helped as a result. (You can read all of these reports here.)

There are always some that make us smile, or laugh, or say, “wow!” And I wanted to share those with you. So here you’ll find our favorites from 2017, all featuring pets helped by your donations.

sundanceSundance: Best Humane Educator
Brother Wolf Animal Rescue in North Carolina got a grant from us to support its humane-education program, and Sundance, a boxer mix who’d been waiting for a home for nine long months, was the perfect canine ambassador. Over four weeks, he taught more than 100 elementary-school students how to properly interact with pets. He became a social-media star and soon found a forever home where he’s the center of attention.

hemiHemi: Craziest Rescue Story
In June, the 2-month-old kitten was seen dodging cars on a busy North Carolina highway. Construction workers stopped traffic to try to catch him, but he vanished. Unbelievably, he’d managed to jump into a car’s undercarriage, and hitchhiked all the way back to the driver’s home, where he hid in the garage, still avoiding capture for several days before finally getting caught on some sticky pads for bugs. In a stroke of luck, the homeowner’s neighbor was a volunteer for Paws for Life NC, and she got Hemi, who had a badly broken leg, the care he needed, with help from our Emergency Medical Grant. These days, Hemi is healthy, safe, and adored by his forever family.

roxanneRoxanne and Lando: Best Bonded Seniors
Senior dogs are hard to find homes for — two XL seniors, even moreso. But when these two gentle, bonded boxers were surrendered to a shelter due to a breakup in the only home they’d ever known, Rescue One in Missouri had to save them. A Petfinder visitor’s Sponsor a Pet donation allowed the group to waive their adoption fee, and after six months in foster care, these two “big babies” went to a loving home — together.

crystalCrystal: Best Reunion
Our Disaster Grant helped Sonoma Humane Society care for pets displaced by Northern California wildfires — including Crystal, who jumped out of her carrier and took off running while her family was evacuating. Luckily, she was eventually caught and brought to the shelter, where, thanks to her microchip, staffers were able to contact Crystal’s owner. As it was safe to return home, the owner came straight in to pick up her cherished 12-year-old cat.

franklinFranklin: Best Playgroup Makeover
We LOVE helping shelters implement playgroup programs! They truly save lives, and Franklin, helped by our grant to Ohio’s Cuyahoga County Animal Shelter, is a perfect example. He arrived with lots of bad behaviors, was labeled dog-aggressive and was nearly impossible for staff to handle. Once they put him in playgroups, he became a different dog! He turned out to be dog-friendly, and his stress-induced behaviors vanished. These days, he’s doing wonderfully in a home with a canine sibling!

billieBillie: Funniest Office Cat
Our grant to Metro East Humane Society in Illinois helped 14-month-old Billie get needed eye surgery. She still has only partial vision, but that doesn’t stop the mischievous kitten from bringing daily smiles to shelter staff as she awaits her forever home — and helps herself to her favorite treats, even if they’re supposed to be “for dogs”!

autumnAutumn: Bravest Chicken
Autumn was badly burned in the Northern California wildfires, and is being rehabilitated at Sonoma Humane Society. But she’s helping others heal at the same time, as part of the shelter’s therapeutic humane-education program, supported by our grant. The program teaches children empathy and compassion and, since the fires, has also provided a calming environment to kids who lost their homes. “The children are learning a lot from Autumn,” program director Carol Rathmann tells us, “but their most important lesson is that every living being deserves a chance.”

5 Steps to a Successful Pet Transfer Program

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Sailor, the dog whose story inspired the grant, with the St. Louis Cardinals’ Matt Carpenter

In 2015, the Petfinder Foundation gave St. Louis’s APA Adoption Center, formerly known as the Animal Protective Association of Missouri, a $10,000 grant to support its Pet Transfer Program, which pulls pets at risk of euthanasia from nearby urban, suburban and rural shelters and brings them to its own state-of-the-art facility, where those pets have a greater chance of being adopted.

We first learned about the program in 2014 when we received this grant report. We’d given APA a $1,000 grant to promote dog adoptions; it had applied those funds toward the Pet Transfer Program and described the program, and how it had saved a dog named Sailor, in its report.

We were impressed by APA’s spirit of cooperation with its transfer partners and its staff’s willingness to use a variety of tools to get exposure for its adoptable pets, including Facebook, Instagram, mobile adoption events, Sunday-brunch fundraisers, corporate PetCare Pride Days, Pet of the Week features on local TV programs and photo ops with St. Louis Cardinals players.

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Sheriff spent his life tied to a 1-ft. rope before he was rescued and adopted from the APA.

The Petfinder Foundation gave APA the $10,000 grant to cover the Transfer Program’s expenses for 2015, with the provisos that APA use that time to make the program self-sustaining (covering the cost of caring for transfer animals through adoption fees and other revenue generators) and that, at the end of the year, it put together a best-practices document so that other shelters could replicate the program’s success.

Here are those best practices, from APA Development Associate Stacey Switzer:

The APA Adoption Center has worked with our local animal control for a number of years, but our official Pet Transfer Program started in 2014. In 2015 we had a total of 19 partners and transferred 1,024 animals to our shelter.

Step 1: Build Trust
One major hurdle we faced from the beginning was that, while our live-release rate at the time was 91%, the APA is an open-admission shelter, not a no-kill shelter. (We currently have a live-release rate of 95% and our average length of stay is only seven days.) So when it came to adding new partners to transfer pets to us, we had to do some relationship-building.

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A former hunting dog, Tony had to learn indoor manners before he could be adopted.

The employee who founded our transfer program had to start with a door-to-door approach, talking to one person at a time. Word of mouth is a powerful thing, and once we had a few key partners on board, they were able to help us spread the word. It was important to talk about our great adoption statistics and the fact that we have an average of 2,000 people walking through our Adoption Center each month. This was an eye-opener to many rescue groups whose adoptable pets are housed in foster homes. There is simply no way for those pets to get as many looks when they’re in a home as they do in our Adoption Center.

The fact that we do euthanize still made some potential partners nervous. To get over this hurdle, we offered guaranteed adoption or the option to return the pet. If for some reason an animal ends up not being an adoption candidate, we always provide our transfer partner the opportunity to take the pet back. It is rare that this happens, but the guarantee offered the security that some of our partners needed to get on board.

Some rescue groups started by transferring just one or two dogs to the APA, I think to make sure we would hold up our end of the deal. Once they saw how quickly the pets were being adopted, they started transferring more to us at a time.

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John Jay, who’d been abused, graduated from the Puppies for Parole training program.

Step 2: Make it Easy for Your Partners
Some shelters in rural areas wanted to partner with us, but transportation was an issue. We approached some volunteers who did dog-walking and in-shelter work for us to see if they would be willing to put in some drive time for us. We were pleasantly surprised by the responses! It’s important to check with the volunteers that you already have. Ours were willing to do it — they’d just never been asked.

Step 3: Transfer in Pets You Really Can Place
Time is a valuable resource, so we have to be very clear about which pets we can and cannot place for adoption. In the beginning, we would transfer pets to the APA and then do heartworm tests after they were signed in. We typically will not place a heartworm-positive dog up for adoption, so we would then contact the partner organization to come pick the dog up. This was a waste of time for both us and our partner.

To solve this problem, if we are going to pick the animals up ourselves, we will heartworm-test before we bring the animal back to the shelter. We have even provided some rural shelters with heartworm tests so they can test dogs before they bring them to us.

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Lana bounced among six homes before finding her forever family at the APA.

We also have to be very clear that we do not place animals who show any signs of aggression or have a bite history. If a pet starts to display that behavior while in our care, we will call the rescue group and give them a reasonable amount of time to pick up the animal if they want to.

Finally, when selecting the dogs we transfer in, we consider the dogs we already have available for adoption in our shelter and try to bring in dogs who will round out our population. The transfer program has really helped the APA increase the variety of adoptable dogs in our shelter. We believe this is part of the reason we saw a 47% increase in adoptions between 2014 and 2015.

Step 4: Make Good Matches
Our adoption process includes a brief interview with potential adopters, followed by a meet-and-greet with the dog or cat. At the APA, we are especially proud of our adoption counselors. They do an amazing job of helping potential adopters pick the right pet for their family. They help make sure the family is selecting a dog that is the right breed, size, and energy level for the household.

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Eddie marked everywhere, but his new family was willing to work with him.

For example, an elderly couple may not be the best fit for a 1-year-old dog who is not leashed-trained and who jumps on people. Our adoption counselors will help them choose a more-relaxed dog. In short, having a variety of breeds for potential adopters to choose from and well-trained adoption counselors are the keys to finding pets forever homes.

Step 5: Make it Pay for Itself
Grant funding is one of the reasons we can sustain the transfer program. Our adoption fees also recover some of the costs. Finally, we have found that collaboration is a wonderful thing that appeals to donors. It has been a great message for us to share with our donor base that in 2015 we gave 1,024 animals a second chance!

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Using Technology to Save Pets’ Lives

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Batman was thrown out of a moving car.

Shelters and rescue groups are increasingly making the most of technology to save homeless pets. That’s why we’ve been giving grants designed to help them do just that. Here are a few examples of pets saved by our tech grants:

Batman
A volunteer for Community Concern for Cats in Walnut Creek, Calif., witnessed this tiny 6-month-old kitten being thrown out the window of a moving car. Once safe in the care of CC4C, he was given medical care, neutered and showered with love. Despite his rough start, he was very friendly, and was quickly adopted by an adoring couple at one of the group’s pet-store adoption sites. His adoption was expedited by one of the three wireless credit-card terminals CC4C had purchased with our technology grant. The terminals allow volunteers to spend less time processing payments and more time rescuing cats like Batman. Read more about how our grant helped cats like him.

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Donna had been chained and left for dead.

Donna
When Donna came to Mutt Scouts in San Diego, she was completely hairless and covered in sores from severe mange. She had been chained up and left for dead as a young pup. Mutt Scouts spend months nursing her back to health — but still, as a “big black dog,” she was overlooked by adopters. Then, Mutt Scouts purchased a new camera with funds from our technology grant. Donna was the first dog they photographed with it. She was soon adopted by a woman who loves her — and who says it was Donna’s smile in her online photo that caught her eye. Read about more dogs helped by our grant to Mutt Scouts.

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Mike B. had severe bite wounds all over his face.

Mike B.
Mike B., a stray cat, was suffering from serious bite wounds to his face when he was rescued by the Tree House Humane Society in Chicago. He also had lesions on his legs, a severe upper respiratory infection and a mass on his tongue, and tested positive for FIV. Shelter staff were not sure whether Mike would survive, but they gave him the medical care he needed and, miraculously, he recovered. Soon, his joyful personality emerged, and he was adopted. He now spends his time playing with his fellow FIV+ rescue cat, Chuck. Mike B. was featured in a video made with help from our technology grant, which funded equipment to help promote more special-needs cats like him. Find out more about this grant.

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Missy’s embedded chain had to be surgically removed.

Sunshine
Animal cruelty convictions and stiff penalties have historically been hard to come by in Fulton County, Ga. But thanks to equipment purchased with funds from our technology grant to LifeLine Animal Project in Atlanta, including digital cameras and GoPro video cameras, those who abuse pets like Sunshine are being brought to justice. Sunshine was found with a collar embedded so deeply in her neck, it had to be surgically removed. Field officers were able to document her condition and present the evidence at trial, and her former owner was convicted and sentenced to 60 days in jail. Sunshine recovered and has been adopted! Read her story.

Your donation today can help change more pets’ lives.

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Saving Pets from Northern California Wildfires

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This kitten was rescued from wildfires by Sonoma Humane Society in Santa Rosa, Calif.; the lost and injured dog was saved by Wine Country Animal Lovers in Calistoga.

To date, three major wildfires raging in Northern California have burned more than 289,000 acres of land; one of them, the Valley Fire, has destroyed more than 1,250 homes. This means residents are fleeing and pets are being lost and injured.

The Petfinder Foundation is helping two organizations that are saving pets from these devastating fires: Sonoma Humane Society in Santa Rosa, Calif., and Wine Country Animal Lovers in Calistoga, Calif. Thanks to your donations, we have granted each group $5,000 in cash to cover medical, pet-care, staffing and other emergency expenses.

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Some pet supplies at Sonoma Humane Society’s evacuation-site outpost for Valley Fire victims

Sonoma Humane Society
Sonoma Humane Society has mobilized to the evacuation site at the Napa Fairgrounds in Calistoga to provide coordination, resources and medical attention for lost and injured pets. It is currently serving 500 people and a more than 400 pets with an on-site triage unit that is providing medical assistance, flea medications and vaccinations; moving animals in need of acute medical care to veterinary partners in local communities; managing an on-site depot where evacuees can pick up supplies so that they can take their pets with them; and using its adoption van to provide a quiet, comfortable place for lost animals to stay while shelter staff attempt to reunite them with their families.

Sonoma Humane Society is also taking in pets at its Santa Rosa campus from a Lake County shelter so that that shelter could make room for animals displaced by the fire. “All local shelters and vets in the fire areas are full,” says Sonoma Humane Society Director of Development Melissa Dobar. “We are placing several of our animals in foster homes to help manage our capacity as we prepare for the influx of more rescued animals. Additionally, we are actively recruiting foster volunteers and providing emergency orientations as we plan for the future needs of the fire victims.”

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This lost dog received medical care thanks to Wine Country Animal Lovers.

Wine Country Animal Lovers
Wine Country Animal Lovers is serving more than 300 animals at the Napa Fairgrounds evacuation site, with more animals arriving with their owners daily. Funds from our disaster grant will be used to pay vets in Lake County for displaced animals injured by the fire as well as pets being brought in by their owners. “We have let all of the vets in Lake County know that our organization will pay them to treat all injured animals, as few owners have the resources to do so,” says Wine Country Animal Lovers Board President Pam Ingalls. “We have asked that they discount what they comfortably can to make the funding go further and have guaranteed payment for their services.”

In addition, Wine Country Animal Lovers has removed all pets scheduled for euthanasia at the county shelter in Lakeport to make space for evacuated animals and placed them in foster care, where they will receive medical care before being put up for adoption. “We will be there as long as needed,” Ingalls says. “This will be a long haul. Not one dollar received will go other than to help Valley Fire animal victims. We are all volunteer-run.”

Thank you for helping us help these organizations save lives. Please donate here to provide additional help to pets in danger.

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Your Donations Helped These Injured Dogs!

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Carley needed emergency surgery to correct a deadly condition.

The Petfinder Foundation’s Emergency Medical Fund has helped dozens of pets suffering from the most severe injuries and illnesses as a result of abuse and neglect. For these animals, medical care is a necessity in order for them to become adoptable. Here are just a few of the pets aided by the Emergency Medical Grants you helped fund:

Carley
Tiny 4-week-old Carley (pictured above) came to Capital Area Rescue Effort (CARE) in Sandston, Va., from an open-admission shelter in South Carolina, where she was scheduled for euthanasia due to her rectal fistula, a congenital birth defect that is fatal in most cases. Not only was the condition extremely painful for her, it caused a severe urinary tract infection that was becoming septic. CARE immediately got Carley emergency surgery to correct the condition. She healed perfectly and is expected to live a normal, happy life!

Gemma

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Gemma was struck by a car and suffered two badly broken legs.

As a homeless puppy in rural Kentucky, Gemma ran across a rural road and was hit head-on by a car doing 60+ miles an hour. She ended up lodged in the grille of the car with two badly broken legs. Her rescuers discovered that the painfully skinny dog’s stomach was full of rocks because she’d been eating anything she could find. She was also infested with fleas and ticks. Without resources for expensive vet care, her rescuers in Kentucky arranged for Gemma to be flown to Cayuga Dog Rescue in Ithaca, N.Y., where she was treated by orthopedic specialists. The loving, playful girl recovered beautifully and has been adopted!

Webster

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Abandoned in the country, Webster’s legs were deformed due to starvation.

Webster was found abandoned behind a barn, living in an outside pen surrounded by six-foot-high weeds. Taken in by Bishop’s Small Dog Rescue in Wyanet, Ill., he was severely emaciated and walking on his elbows due to malnourishment and lack of exercise. His right paw was completely floppy, and X-rays revealed that the bones of his wrist had been completely pulverized. Webster has been gaining weight and getting healthy as his vets observe him to determine whether his leg will need to be amputated or whether it can be reinforced with surgically implanted plates. But one thing is for sure: He will never know hunger and abandonment again.

Rucker

Rucker

Rucker’s owner ran him over with her car and left him to suffer for two weeks.

Rucker’s owner ran over the 1-year-old pit bull mix with her car, then left him tied to a chain to suffer for two weeks. His left femur was broken in two, his left hip completely out of its socket. Our grant helped Dog Town Canine Rescue pay for the amputation of Rucker’s injured leg. He is doing great as a tripod and has been adopted into an adoring home where he has two canine companions to romp with. Dog Town Canine Rescue is working with law enforcement to assist with the prosecution of Rucker’s former owner.

Reason

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Used for breeding, Reason had her teeth pulled out so she wouldn’t bite.

Reason was rescued by M&M’s Fur-Ever Furbabies in Vass, N.C., from a life where she was used for breeding. She was starved, beaten, shoved into tiny crates for days, overbred, and had her canines shaved down and front top and bottom teeth pulled out so she couldn’t bite. Her gums were bruised, swollen, irritated and extremely painful, making it very hard for her to eat. We gave the rescue a grant to have dental surgery to correct the painful condition of Reason’s mouth so that she could eat and regain her health. She has gained 20 lbs., is starting to eat solid foods and, best of all, now has a constantly wagging tail, runs and jumps daily and displays a contagious smile every day.

Your support has meant the end of suffering for these dogs and other pets. Please consider donating to the Petfinder Foundation’s Emergency Medical Grant fund this holiday season to give the gift of a pain-free life to others like them.

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More help for shelters affected by Texas, Oklahoma floods

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Flood rescue Nieve, with severe internal injuries, was saved by Austin Pets Alive!

We’re continuing to help shelters and rescue groups recover from recent devastating floods in Texas and Oklahoma. We recently granted $10,000 to Austin Pets Alive!, which not only suffered extensive damage when it was flooded on Memorial Day, but has also been called on to take in pets from surrounding towns and counties affected by the widespread flooding in central Texas, where shelters are overcrowded with lost and rescued pets.

“We need to foster out about 80 animals normally housed in our shelter,” Grants Manager Maggie Lynch says. “As of May 29, we have taken in 140 from other counties but are being called on to take many more as flooding continues.”

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Flooded kennels at Austin Pets Alive!

Our grant will help fund repairs to APA’s shelter: Its roof failed under the torrents of rain and its ground level was flooded. The rain-damaged parts of the building must be torn out quickly, as mold develops rapidly in Austin’s climate.

Our grant will also help pay staffers, who worked nearly 200 extra hours to coordinate the fostering out of all the shelter’s animals, and cover medical intake (including vaccines, tests and microchips) and spay/neuter for pets taken in from surrounding regions.

One pet rescued from the floods just in time is Nieve (pictured above). The little dog had suffered a tear to his diaphragm, allowing his organs to migrate into his chest cavity. APA’s vets operated, and he’s now recovering in foster care.

“We’re so grateful to be able to help pets like him because we are getting such great support from foundations like yours,” says Lynch.

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Flooding outside A Doggie 4 You in Texas

Replacing Kennels, Food
We also granted $1,000 to two organizations that suffered damage to their facilities and destruction of pet food. In Pipe Creek, Texas, our grant will help A Doggie 4 You replace more than 20 bags of dog food destroyed when storm rain and wind tore through its feed room.

“Thank you so much,” says president Patricia Godkin. “We really appreciate your support. We currently have 60 dogs and it has been crazy. We are finally getting a break from the rain. You guys are lifesavers.”

And in Tulsa, Okla., we’re aiding Amore Pit Bull Rescue. Founder Misty Bilby tells us: “We have two 10′  x 10′ x 6′ dog kennels that were destroyed when trees fell on them, and we had many bags of dog food ruined due to flood water.” The grant will be a big help. “We want to thank you so much for caring for our babies,” Bilby says, “and helping us make sure they are taken care of.”

Please donate now to help us continue to help shelters and rescue groups affected by flooding in Texas and Oklahoma!

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