Posts Categorized: Grants

Helping West Coast Animal Wildfire Victims

An evacuee’s rabbit being cared for by Saving Grace

As wildfires ravage the West Coast, we’re helping shelters and rescue groups care for the animal victims.

Saving Grace Pet Adoption Center
We’ve sent a Disaster Fund grant to Saving Grace Pet Adoption Center in Roseburg, OR, which is taking in pets belonging to locals forced by the Archie Creek Fire to evacuate.

“Douglas County, along with the entire state of Oregon, is dealing with wildfires on a scale we’ve never seen before,” says Executive Director Megan Gram. “We currently have two wildfires causing level-three go-now evacuations for about 3,000 local residents. The fire which is impacting us most is the Archie Creek Fire. It is currently burning at 121,000 acres and is about 10% contained.”

A cat at Saving Grace

The shelter is also offering free pet food and crates for residents in need. “We are now starting to see strays who we assume were left behind by owners who did not have time to get them out,” Gram says. “We believe we will see more and more strays, whom we hope to be able to reunite with their owners in the coming weeks. We are reaching out to other counties in our area to see how we can help as we have additional space available to take in more animals as needed. We are currently caring for 43 evacuated pets on top of our existing shelter population.”

Petfinder Foundation grant funds will be used to provide care for displaced pets as well as strays who may have injuries sustained from the fires.

Evacuated chickens at Sanctuary One

Sanctuary One
We’ve granted additional disaster funds to Sanctuary One in Jacksonville, OR, where the Almeda and Obenchain fires have caused massive evacuations of both animals and people.

“We have taken in more dogs from our county shelter (four are being officially signed over to us and two will be held as fosters for the county),” says Executive Director Megan Flowers. “We are also working with our local law-enforcement community to help rescue farm animals in evacuation sites.”

Grant funds will help pay for dog food and vet bills for the dogs pulled from Jackson County Animal Services, as well as gas and staff time required for the farm-animal rescues. The shelter is working with more than 40 farm animal rescues/evacuations and receiving new calls every hour from the sheriff department to assist in more farm-animal rescues.

A burned cat at Whitman County Humane Society

Whitman County Humane Society
Another disaster grant recipient is Whitman County Humane Society in Pullman, WA. On Sept. 7, a wildfire destroyed most of the homes and buildings in the small towns of Malden and Pine City. Because the fire was moving so quickly due to high wind speeds, many people were forced to evacuate quickly, leaving behind their belongings and their pets.

“As the fire has gone out, people’s animals are returning to the area burned and injured,” says Director of Shelter Operations Ashley Renae Phelps. “We have been taking in all of the unclaimed animals as well as helping match lost pets to their owners.”

Grant funds will support staff working to catch stray burn victims and pay for these injured animals’ medical care. “We have already received five cats from this situation with vet bills totaling over $3,000,” Phelps says. “There is a known feral colony of about 30-40 cats living in the Malden area who, if alive, will need assistance.”

A bird at Exotic Bird Rescue Center of Oregon

Exotic Bird Rescue of Oregon
We sent additional funds to Exotic Bird Rescue of Oregon in Springfield, which has been asked by Greenhill Humane Society in Eugene to help provide shelter and care for exotic birds displaced by the Glendower/Almeda Drive, Beachie, and Riverside fires.

Because the fires are so fast-moving, many exotic-bird owners have been forced to evacuate without their pets’ food, cages, toys, and medications. The rescue’s foster homes have been providing smoke-free havens for the sensitive animals, and Exotic Bird Rescue has been taking food to evacuation centers where displaced pet owners have been staying with their birds housed in carriers or travel cages.

Our grant funds will be used to pay for food, cages, and toys or toy materials, as well as medications and any medical attention that displaced birds might need.

Siskiyou Humane Society staff feeding animals sheltering in place

Siskiyou Humane Society
Another disaster grant will help Siskiyou Humane Society in Mt. Shasta, CA, which is helping pets affected by the Slater Fire in Happy Camp, CA. The shelter has been deployed by Siskiyou County Animal Control as boots on the ground, conducting animal rescue, checking homes for animals, and leaving food and water where animals are sheltering in place after their owners have evacuated.

“Expenses associated with the service provided for this fire include fuel, food, wages, and pet supplies,” says Shelter Manager Kim Latos. “We had to close to accommodate the rescue services, leaving minimal staff. Everyone had to work longer hours. Our new transport van had engine failure and staff used their own vehicles to transport food and supplies and visit the areas deployed to.”

Your donation to our Disaster Fund helps us help more pets like these.

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The Best Pet Transformations of 2019

We asked the shelters and rescue groups that received grants from the Petfinder Foundation this year to send us their favorite rescued-pet transformations of 2019.

Here are just a few of the submissions we received.

Many of these images are graphic. But these are the realities that animal rescuers face on a daily basis. Thank you to the shelter staff and rescue-group volunteers who work around the clock to save these vulnerable pets.

Your donation today can help change more pets’ lives.

The Most Amazing Transformations of 2018:

The Most Amazing Transformations of 2017:

The Most Amazing Transformations of 2016:

The Most Amazing Transformations of 2015:

The Most Amazing Transformations of 2014:

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Getting Dogs Out of Shelters – ASAP!

Shelter dog Cookie with one of her field-trip fosters

We like programs that help homeless pets by breaking down old ways of thinking — like the idea that shelter dogs need to stay in shelters! That’s why we’re supporting field-trip programs, which get dogs out of shelters for a few hours or even days.

These programs have countless benefits:

  • They relieve stress for the dogs, and tire them out so they’re better behaved when they get back to their kennels.
  • They let volunteers collect valuable information about (and take adorable photos and videos of) the dogs in real-world settings.
  • They get the dogs out into their communities, and their adorable faces in front of potential adopters.
  • They attract new volunteers and adopters by offering a low-stakes way to hang out with the dogs.

ACC field-trip favorite Bundles

When Animal Care Centers of NYC (ACC) debuted its field-trip program, the line to volunteer stretched down the block! “The BoroughBreak is a great way to not only give the animals much-needed time out of the shelter, but to gain deeper insight into their behavior from our fosters and volunteers,” says the shelter’s Jennifer DiClemente, “who become adoption ambassadors for great dogs like Bundles.”

ACC’s grant from the Petfinder Foundation will fund the purchase of no-pull harnesses so that volunteers can feel confident handling dogs who need to practice leash manners or have energy to burn — the same dogs who benefit most from getting out of the shelter.

DAWG dog Rocket on his field trip

Denison Animal Welfare Group (DAWG) received a Petfinder Foundation grant to purchase supplies such as collars, leashes, and ID tags for its field-trip dogs. The program has been a game-changer for the Texas shelter: “Dogs are receiving more visitors and increased visibility in our community,” says President Stephanie Phillips.

Hold times are shorter, adoptions are occurring quicker,” and other organizations are more likely to pull dogs thanks to an abundance of information about them, she adds, including “videos, report cards, likes and dislikes, and things the volunteers might not have observed in a shelter setting.”

Ping’s field-trip fosters adopted him!

“The program does so much for our dogs,” says Mirah Horowitz, Executive Director of Hawaii’s Kauai Humane Society, which also received a Field Trip Grant. “It gives them a much-needed break from the stress and boredom of living in the shelter. It improves their socialization by getting them out in new environments and with new people. And, it some lucky dogs’ cases, it results in a forever home!”

One such lucky dog was Ping. “His family was living on Kauai for a temporary work assignment and took him out on multiple field trips. As they were getting ready to return to the mainland, the adopter’s children decided to surprise their mom on Mother’s Day with the gift of unconditional love. The family adopted Ping, and now he is living his best life on the East Coast!

The Animal Foundation’s Papz

Since launching its program in July, The Animal Foundation in Las Vegas has sent more than 150 dogs on field trips to restaurants, parks, and even family holiday gatherings. “These temporary breaks have helped many of our dogs better cope with living in the shelter as they await their forever homes,” says Development Manager Amy Wiles.

The shelter will use its Petfinder Foundation grant to purchase booties for field-trip dogs. “They will protect the dogs’ paws as they venture out into our uniquely hot Las Vegas climate with its scorching surfaces,” Wiles says.

With your help, we can get more dogs out of shelters, where they can de-stress, show off their true personalities and meet potential forever families.

We’re Keeping Shelter Pets Safe from Dangerous Heat

This summer, many parts of the country have experienced dangerously high temperatures.

That’s why the Petfinder Foundation has Summer Cooling Grants available as part of our longstanding Disaster Fund.

Our grant helped Adele stay cool.

Our Summer Cooling Grant helped the dogs at Arizona’s Pima Animal Care Center, which used the funds to install an overhead misting system in two outdoor yards. In Tucson, where temperatures can top 110 degrees, the yards had often been unusable for both the dogs and potential adopters.

Now, thanks to the misting system, “nobody’s getting overheated,” Adoption Coordinator Ellie Beaubien said. “We really needed those. It was a great investment.” We also provided the shelter with kiddie pools, which were enjoyed by dogs like Bear (top photo) and Adele (above).

Skylar enjoyed shade, turf and mist.

The Humane Society of Southern Arizona used our Summer Cooling Grant to install a misting system, a shade sail and turf in its yard, which had previously been hard dirt.

Thanks to those upgrades, “It goes from scorching hot to tropical cool within seconds of flipping a switch,” Shelter PR Coordinator Sara Gromley said. “Staff members enjoy taking breaks by bringing dogs out in the yard and it’s actually pleasant to be outdoors. Petfinder Foundation, we love you!”

Nala the donkey chills out.

Our Summer Cooling Grants don’t help only dogs. Lusco Farms Rescue in Iowa used its grant to purchase two large fans and build a multipurpose pasture shelter for the donkeys, mules and miniature horses in its care.

“The grant not only allowed us to make a cooling station, but we designed it to be used as a shelter in the winter as well,” said Treasurer Scott Shehan. “So the donkeys will now be nice and dry even when it rains or snows.”

We don’t expect to see the end of extreme temperatures any time soon, so these severe-weather grants are now a permanent part of our Disaster program. Your donation to our Disaster Fund will help us save lives.

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You Helped Save These Adorable Cats

Chiarra was found with a ruptured eye.

Your donation to the Petfinder Foundation’s Emergency Medical Fund has helped countless sick and injured pets — including these four adorable kitties!

Chiarra
The sweet 5-month-old kitten was found alone in a Pennsylvania parking lot, one eye ruptured due to infection and the other in bad shape. Taken in by Cherished Cats Rescue Alliance in Lewisburg, PA, Chiarra received good nutrition and care and, with help from our grant, surgery to remove the ruptured eye and repair the remaining one. After recovering, she was quickly adopted by a local family. Read Chiarra’s full story here.

Foster was abandoned in a box with a broken pelvis.

Foster
Foster was abandoned in a box in a vacant lot. He was cold, thirsty, hungry, and terribly injured. Paws of Hope in Stevensville, MI, rescued him and took him to the vet, where x-rays revealed that he had a broken pelvis and dislocated femur, most likely from being hit by a car. With help from our grant, Foster had a complicated surgery to treat his injuries. Three months later, he was adopted, and is thriving today. Read Foster’s full story here.

Marvel was thrown out of a moving car.

Marvel
Marvel was cruelly thrown out of a moving car, injuring his front leg. Under the care of Happy Tails Rescue in Chatham, VA, it became clear that the leg would require surgery, as Marvel was dragging it and it was becoming swollen and abraded. Our grant enabled Marvel to get his foot repaired to prevent pain and further injury. Today, he’s been adopted and can now walk normally, run, play and jump. Marvel has been adopted! Read Marvel’s full story here.

One of Gypsy’s rear feet was missing.

Gypsy
The 6-month-old long-haired calico was brought to Helotes Humane Society in San Antonio, TX, because her owners could not afford the care she needed. She’d been found with one of her rear feet missing and the other partially gone. The shelter’s vet said Gypsy needed part of her leg amputated to relieve her pain. Thanks to our grant, Gypsy got the surgery she needed and was adopted soon thereafter. She doesn’t let her disability hamper her life, and enjoys lots of love and affection in her new home. Read Gypsy’s full story here.

Your donations made happy endings possible for these cats and hundreds of other pets. Thank you for supporting the Petfinder Foundation and helping pets in need!

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The Stories That Made Us Smile in 2018

Every time we give a grant to a shelter or rescue group, we ask for a report detailing how they used the funds and telling us the story of an individual pet helped as a result. (You can read all of these reports here.)

There are always some that make us smile, or laugh, or say, “wow!” And I wanted to share those with you. So here you’ll find our favorites from 2018, all featuring pets helped by your donations.

Best Breed Ambassador: Ginger
An adoptable pit bull at Associated Humane Societes in Newark, N.J., Ginger (pictured above) arrived at the shelter fearful and anxious. The staff decided to make her the resident office dog to socialize her. She quickly came to love all people, and soon got a second job: She visits area libraries so children can practice reading to her. Her calm, sweet disposition mean she’s always a popular audience.

Best Jogging Buddy: T-Bone
We’ve heard of stray dogs joining humans on their runs, but cats? T-Bone was walking along a Colorado hiking trail when a man jogged by. The friendly cat joined him and ran along beside him for a couple of miles. After the run, the jogger brought T-Bone to Colorado’s Routt County Humane Society, where a Petfinder Foundation grant helped him find a wonderful forever home.

Most Dramatic Rescue: Bear
Fleeing Hawaii’s volcanic eruption in May, a dog named Bear and his owner were separated moments before they were to be rescued by helicopter. Despite many subsequent searches, Bear could not be found. After several weeks, volunteers hiked into the lava-flow zone and found him! He was much leaner, but in good spirits and happy for some company. With help from our disaster grant, Hawaii Island Humane Society was able to rescue Bear (along with some cats, ducks and chickens) and reunite him with his owner.

Best Model: Pom Pom
When Pom Pom was adopted after 2 1/2 years at Jersey Shore Animal Center, staff and volunteers cried tears of joy. Her adopter didn’t care that Pom Pom was 10 years old, had no teeth, and suffered from an autoimmune disease — she just wanted to rescue a cat who really needed a home. Sweet Pom Pom had been so beloved at the shelter that a volunteer painted a beautiful picture of her, which was presented to her adopter. Pom Pom is now being pampered in her forever home.

Best Second Act: Jackson
Jackson lost both eyes as a result of dog fighting. Florida’s Pit Sisters rescue took him into its TAILS (Teaching Animals and Inmates Life Skills) program and, when one particular inmate started training Jackson, they formed an instant bond. Thanks to a Petfinder Foundation grant, Jackson was able to go home with his new dad after graduation — the perfect second chapter for both.

Best Office Assistant: Casper
Casper would “attack” when anyone tried to open the door to his cage at Michigan’s Harbor Humane Society. So staffers decided to see how Casper would do in a different environment and put him into office foster. Within hours, Casper showed his true nature. He loved attention so much, staff took to calling him Caspuurrrr because of his loud purrs when he was pet. He soon went to a wonderful home with another long-term resident cat.

Best Cinderella Story: Ginger
Somerset Humane Society in Maine used our grant to purchase agility equipment, which worked like a charm on a 2-year-old pit mix named Ginger. Ginger had been at the shelter for months, with no interest because she was so anxious in her kennel, barking and throwing herself at the kennel door. But the new agility equipment helped her use up her excess energy and focus on learning routines. After the shelter posted Facebook photos of her doing her tricks, she was adopted within a week!

As you know, these stories are only possible because of your support. Thank you so much from all of us at the Petfinder Foundation, and warmest wishes for 2019!

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The Year’s Best Pet-Rescue Transformations

We asked the shelters and rescue groups that received grants from the Petfinder Foundation this year to send us their favorite rescued-pet transformations of 2018.

Here are just a few of the submissions we received.

Many of these images are graphic. But these are the realities that animal rescuers face on a daily basis. Thank you to the shelter staff and rescue-group volunteers who work around the clock to save these vulnerable pets.

Your donation today can help change more pets’ lives.

The Most Amazing Transformations of 2017:

The Most Amazing Transformations of 2016:

The Most Amazing Transformations of 2015:

The Most Amazing Transformations of 2014:

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Meet the Florence Victims Our Grant Recipients Saved!

Hensley, a female Lab-mix puppy, was found in Pender County, N.C., by the Asheville-based Brother Wolf Animal Rescue.

Here’s an update on how the adoption groups who received Petfinder Foundation Disaster Grants are helping pets impacted by Hurricane Florence.

A dog being transported to safety by Peak Lab Rescue

We granted $2,500 to Peak Lab Rescue in Apex, N.C., which has rescued more than 100 dogs from Florence, including 48 dogs pulled before the storm at the request of shelters facing closure, as well as pets still being rescued from affected areas on an ongoing basis. The group also transported 42 dogs and 40 cats to safety from the Carteret County Humane Society in Newport, N.C., after it was partially destroyed by Florence.

Larkin, a 3-month-old kitten, was found by Brother Wolf in Pender County, N.C.

We granted $2,000 to Brother Wolf Animal Rescue in Asheville, N.C., which rescued and/or provided care to around 250 animals before and after Hurricane Florence. Brother Wolf evacuated animals from shelters in Harnett County, N.C., and Horry and Fairfield Counties in South Carolina, transporting them to 10 rescue partners New York State and Fort Myers, Fla.

Brother Wolf also sent its Rapid Response team to rescue stray, lost and abandoned animals from the floodwaters in Warsaw, N.C. The pets rescued included a tiny 4-week-old kitten found screaming for help atop a floating pile of debris; two dogs, one of them completely blind, who’d been abandoned in one-foot-deep freezing water inside their home; and four cats whose elderly owners had been forced to evacuate without them and were desperate to get them back.

Kassandra was rescued by Operation Paws for Homes

We also granted $1,500 to Operation Paws for Homes in Alexandria, Va., which transported animals from rural North and South Carolina shelters. The pets saved included Kassandra (above), a 5-year-old Lab mix who’d been in a shelter that was right in Florence’s path and was forced to evacuate. Kassandra, who is shy at first but gets along with dogs, cats, and kids, is healthy and ready for her forever home!

Gummo was brought to an N.J. foster home .

Our grant of $1,000 to JerseyGirls Animal Rescue in South Plainfield, N.J., helped the seven dogs the group rescued from North Carolina, before and after Hurricane Florence. All the dogs, who range from just under a year to 4-5 years old, received routine vet care, spay/neuter, and treatment for any medical conditions, and all seven are still available for adoption. They include Gummo (above, pictured while waiting for transport to a foster home in New Jersey).

Thank you so much for your donation to our Disaster Fund; we could not have helped these organizations save lives without donors like you!

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We’re Helping Save Pets from Hurricane Florence

A dog evacuated by Brother Wolf

As the floodwaters from Hurricane Florence continue to rise, we’re helping adoption groups that are rescuing abandoned animals and evacuating adoptable pets from local shelters to make room for flood victims.

A kitten rescued by Brother Wolf

We’ve sent a Disaster Grant to Brother Wolf Animal Rescue in Asheville, N.C., whose Rapid Response team is running search-and-rescue efforts in flooded areas. “It’s not uncommon to find dogs on chains neck-deep in water, community cats in trees, and animals who are ill, injured, or severely malnourished and dehydrated from surviving for days without food or fresh water,” Brother Wolf’s Andee Bingham tells us.

A puppy rescued by Operation Paws for Homes

We’ve also rushed funds to Operation Paws for Homes in Alexandria, Va., which transported animals from rural North and South Carolina shelters in Florence’s path. “Many have only outdoor kennels that offer little protection from the elements,” says OPH volunteer Mark Conners. The pets are now in loving foster homes and receiving necessary veterinary care.

This dog is safe with JerseyGirls.

Another Disaster Grant recipient, JerseyGirls Animal Rescue in South Plainfield, N.J., has taken in adoptable dogs from a North Carolina shelter that had to evacuate prior to Florence’s arrival. “We intend to rescue more dogs from the areas affected by the hurricane,” says president Rosemary Petriello. “Unfortunately, the likelihood of those dogs being in poor health is very high.

These grants are just the beginning of what we expect to be weeks of rescue and recovery efforts. We are continuing to reach out to shelters and rescue groups to provide whatever assistance is needed.

Your donation to our Disaster Fund will help the animal victims of Hurricane Florence.

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These Four Dogs Were Suffering — Until You Helped

cindy

Cindy before surgery (left) and in her new home


Your donations to the Petfinder Foundation’s Emergency Medical Fund help hundreds of sick, injured and abused homeless pets every year. Here are four of the most recent:

Cindy
As a young puppy, Cindy’s leg was badly injured (she may have been hit by a car). Rather than seeking proper treatment, her owner chose to apply a homemade splint. This caused her leg to become permanently deformed, making it difficult for her to sit, stand and walk and causing permanent pain. Our grant to Homeless Animal Rescue Team in Virginia paid for Cindy’s amputation surgery, and today, Cindy is happy, healthy, and living the good life with her doggy brother in her forever home! Read her story.

vlad

Vladimir has made a full recovery


Vladimir
This 1-year-old Siberian husky was hit by a car on a major highway in San Antonio. Rescued by Molino de Suenos/Windmill of Dreams Animal Rescue and Sanctuary in Texas, he was taken to a veterinary clinic and x-rays showed multiple fractures in his leg. Our grant paid for his much-needed orthopedic surgery. Vladimir had 100% recovery of his leg function and has been adopted. Read his story.

pixie

Pixie is loving her pain-free life in her new home


Pixie
When Pixie came to the Roanoke Valley SPCA in Virginia, she refused to walk. X-rays revealed that her leg had been broken and had tried to heal without treatment. Thanks to our grant, the shelter was able to pay for amputation surgery and placed Pixie in a foster home to recover. After weeks of healing, Pixie’s foster family realized they had fallen in love with her so much that they had to adopt her. Pixie is now part of a loving family that spoils her rotten! Read her story.

barney

Barney is loved by his new family


Barney
Barney was surrendered to Georgia Pet T.A.I.L.S. after his owner left him on a cable tie-out during the day. The cable got caught wrapped around his back legs. He was left like that for so long that the circulation was cut off nearly the entire day to both rear legs. Our grant enabled the rescue to provide Barney with two surgeries and several skin grafts, and today he is a healthy, happy boy who has recently been adopted! Read his story.

Thank you so much for all your support, which allows us to save these pets and many others like them!

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