Posts By: Karen Hollish

Keeping a Sanctuary’s ‘Fragile’ Cats Healthy and Clean

Ten-year-old Hannah is up for adoption at Shadow Cats.

Ten-year-old Hannah is up for adoption at Shadow Cats.

Our grant of John Paul Pet Ear & Eye Wipes to Shadow Cats is making a huge difference for the elderly and FLV+ cats being cared for by the Round Rock, Tex., sanctuary.

President Sheila Smith sends us this report of how the Ear & Eye Wipes have helped decrease the incidence of illness for the organization’s most vulnerable cats:

“Since we are a sanctuary environment and focus more on long-term and hospice care, we don’t do as many adoptions as other groups. We focus on long-term care for those cats who are perceived to be less-adoptable — feral, scared, seniors, feline leukemia-positive, etc. — although almost all of our cats are available for adoption.

“We currently have 86 cats at the sanctuary, and we primarily used the Eye & Ear Wipes with our 24 feline leukemia-positive cats. We most definitely saw an increase in overall health and cleanliness of the cats. We did not have an instance of upper-respiratory infection in this area, and I believe much of that was related to product usage and the ability to keep the cats cleaner and to clean off facial/eye/nose drainage as soon as it was observed.

Ashley is a feline leukemia-positive cat being helped by our grant.

Born as a stray in San Antonio, Ashley is a feline leukemia-positive cat being helped by our John Paul Pet grant.

“We love this product. It is handy and we are able to grab it quickly when we need it. It’s soft and we are able to wipe the cat’s eyes and face quickly without distressing the cat.

“We have one cat, Polly, who was rescued during Best Friends’ Great Kitty Rescue in 2007. She is feline leukemia-positive and has a blocked tear duct. Her eye often has drainage. She is now very used to us cleaning her eyes! I’ve attached a pic of her getting one of her frequent ‘eye baths’ from one of our volunteers, Susan VandeVoorde!

Volunteer Susan VandeVoorde gives Polly an eye bath.

Volunteer Susan VandeVoorde gives Polly an eye bath.

“It also makes a difference in some of the cats who are elderly and have less-than-stellar grooming habits. We are able to keep them clean. This really is a great product, and I feel safe using it with the cats. I have also asked my husband, Dr. Roy Smith, the 2013 president of the American Association of Feline Practitioners, his thoughts, and he feels this is a great product in helping us help the cats to live healthier lives.

“Thank you for choosing Shadow Cats and our community of fragile sanctuary cats to help — we sincerely appreciate it!”

Polly Relaxes

Polly looks looks clean and happy, thanks to our John Paul Pet Ear & Eye Wipes grant.

Donate to help us keep more homeless pets healthy, and Orvis will match your gift!

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Maimed Dog and Puppies Are Rescued Just in Time

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Sissy and her puppies soon after their rescue. Note Sissy’s deep neck wound.

After spending her entire life on a chain that eventually became embedded in her neck, a dog named Sissy, along with her severely neglected puppies, was saved thanks to our Shelter+ Challenge grant to Start Over Rover in Hastings, Neb.

Start Over Rover Vice President Amy Michalek tells us how the grant, made possible by our partnership with The Animal Rescue Site, gave Sissy and her family a second chance:

“Start Over Rover was asked to help a mother dog and her seven puppies. Located approximately 1,000 miles away, this canine family was scheduled to be euthanized the next morning. They were being temporarily housed at the St. Martin Parish shelter near St. Martinville, La. They were all victims of severe abuse and neglect. The Sheriff’s Department had taken the animals from their abusive owner and they were taken to the local municipal shelter. Because no one had adopted them within seven days, they were slated to be euthanized. The shelter manager posted a plea on the Internet, hoping that someone would come through for the family of dogs. Everyone involved hated the thought that they had been rescued from their abuser only to face being euthanized seven days later.

“The momma dog, whom we now call Sissy, had been chained to a tree when she was just a pup. As Sissy grew, the chain grew into her neck. She gave birth to a litter of puppies when she was approximately six months old and still chained to the tree. After neighbors complained about Sissy’s embedded collar, her abusive owner tore the chain out of her neck; she then had no way to ‘keep’ Sissy except to put her in a chicken coop with her puppies. They all became flea-infested. Chickens are omnivorous, and as they pecked at the fleas on the puppies, some drew blood and then the chickens ate off part of the limbs before Sissy was able to get them off of the puppies. This resulted in two of the puppies missing limbs or parts of limbs. Sissy had a two-inch deep wound around her neck after the embedded chain was removed.

SISSY

Sissy nursing her puppies

“Two of Start Over Rover’s board members flew to Louisiana to retrieve the family before they were euthanized. The Rover volunteers arrived at the St. Martin shelter at 11:30 that night, retrieved Sissy and her babies, and started the 19-hour drive back home. During this time, they grew especially fond of the smallest puppy in the litter, whom they named Runtley. He was the sickest of the pups, so he got to ride up front, being cuddled and loved during the trip home. About six hours into the trip, Runtley suffered severe diarrhea and started crying out in pain. He ended up passing away in the volunteers’ arms just as they entered a veterinary clinic in Oklahoma to get him some help. The volunteers were heartbroken.

“The emotional Rover volunteers arrived back in Hastings around 6 p.m. that evening. They arrived to a TV truck with cameras, and lots of volunteers to greet them, as well as a newly built isolation room. Volunteers at Start Over Rover worked around the clock to build the air-conditioned, separately ventilated room in only 24 hours, just in time for the arrival of Sissy and her pups.

Aggie was missing a limb and suffering from a staph infection.

Sissy’s pup Aggie was missing a limb and suffering from a staph infection, which is visible on her torso.

“Momma Sissy was named after St. Francis of Assisi, the patron saint of animals. Little Fay was named after Lafayette, La., which was the city into which the Rover volunteers flew. (Fay passed away shortly after arriving in Nebraska due to complications from a staph infection.) Marty was named after the St. Martin shelter which saved the dogs initially and then put out the nationwide call for help. Aggie was named after a woman on Facebook who aptly applied a not-so-nice name to the abuser of this family. Beau was named after a town near the St. Martin shelter, Breaux Bridge, and we swear that the staff at the shelter were all pronouncing it ‘Beau Bridge.’ Annie, who is the largest of the puppies, was named after the director of Start Over Rover, Anne Halbert, who was one of the volunteers on this rescue trip. Selah was given her name because God clearly had His hand in all of this.

“Finally, there was little Runtley, our sweet baby who passed on the way home. His and Fay’s ashes are in two urns located inside Start Over Rover. We are sad they are gone, but we are so happy that they knew that they were loved before they passed. All of the remaining puppies have been adopted and are doing very well.”

Momma Sissy’s neck wound was too wide to be stitched or stapled, so volunteers treated her with hydrotherapy three times a day until it could be stitched closed. “Today you can’t even tell that Sissy had such a severe wound,” Michalek says. “Her coat is shiny, she has put on weight, and she loves to play.”

And in even happier news: “Sissy is finally adopted and in a very happy home where she is much appreciated,” Michalek says. “After hearing Sissy’s story, her new family promised that they would never ever put another collar around her neck! She uses a harness when needed.”

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Sissy today

Donate to help us save dogs like Sissy, and Orvis will match your gift!

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Our Cooling Grants Help Homeless Donkeys Too!

We're helping keep Storm E. the donkey cool this summer.

Storm E. has a condition called string halt which causes her to walk funny, but with minimal pain.

We’re keeping homeless dogs — and donkeys — safe this summer, thanks to your support of our Summer Cooling Campaign.

Lusco Farms Rescue in Malvern, Iowa, and HOPE Animal Shelter in Tucson are the latest recipients of Summer Cooling grants. Each has received $1,000 to help keep the animals in their care cool, comfortable and safe in the heat.

For Lusco Farms Rescue, that means donkeys like Storm E., who came there with multiple medical issues caused by a lifetime of poor nutrition, will finally have new, shaded lean-tos in her pasture.

“Because we’ll have more areas covered with shade, we can take in more donkeys,” Lusco Farms President Lura Shehan tells us.

Many of the group’s donkeys come from people who acquired them as pets without thoroughly researching the care the animals need, she says. Still more come from cattle ranchers, who purchased the donkeys to protect their herds but lost the herds when the economy worsened.

In Tucson, HOPE Animal Shelter will use its grant to install a new misting system and sunshades so dogs can be cool in their outdoor runs.

“It has been over 100 degrees for 24 days in a row,” Executive Director Susan Scherl tells us. “Because of our hard water, the inexpensive mister we currently use keeps getting clogged.”

Our Executive Director Lisa Robinson with Rizzo from HOPE Animal Shelter

Our executive director, Lisa Robinson, chills with Rizzo, an affectionate 10-year-old at HOPE Animal Shelter in Tucson.

The improvements will help dogs like Rizzo, above, get more socialization and exercise time outdoors. HOPE has a soft spot for senior dogs, Scherl says, so she works with other local shelters to take in older dogs who are at great risk of euthanasia. She also takes in abused and abandoned dogs like Evie, below, who was tied to the shelter’s fence overnight and spends many hours in its outdoor runs.

Evie is waiting at HOPE Animal Shelter.

Evie waited for days for the person who abandoned her at HOPE Animal Shelter to return.

“We don’t have air conditioning, so anything that can cool off the dogs outside in this Tucson heat is wonderful,” Scherl says. “The misters will be a great addition.”

Donate to help us keep more pets safe and cool this summer, and Orvis will match your gift!
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A Flood Threatens Reservation Dogs in Montana

George had to be evacuated from RezQ Dogs.

George has been evacuated from RezQ Dogs’ shelter because of the flood.

When the shelter housing pets rescued by RezQ Dogs — which saves extremely at-risk dogs from two isolated Indian reservations in Montana — was destroyed on June 4 by a flood, we rushed $3,000 in disaster aid to Dodson, Mont., where RezQ Dogs is building new kennels so it can keep saving the area’s stray, abused and unwanted dogs.

“Every inch of the property is covered with three to four inches of silt and mud,” RezQ Dogs President Anita Wilke tells us. “Ten kennels are destroyed, as is the perimeter fence. All of the dog houses are either contaminated or destroyed.”

Flooded dog runs at RezQ Dogs.

Flooded dog runs at RezQ Dogs’ shelter

RezQ Dogs takes in dogs, cats and other animals from the Fort Belknap and Rocky Boy’s reservations. Together, the communities cover roughly 1,200 square miles in North-Central Montana, and the prospects for homeless dogs are dire in both, Wilke says.

On Fort Belknap, Wilke says, “Dogs spend their mandatory three-day hold cramped into the live trap in which they were captured.”

“Because there is no budget for animal control, there is no budget for medical needs or even food for the dogs that find their way to ‘animal control,’ ” she adds. “Prior to RezQ Dogs, the Fort Belknap Animal Control euthanized 95 percent of all incoming dogs. Only 5 percent were reclaimed by owners or found new homes. Strays on Fort Belknap were held for three days, if they didn’t cause a problem, and then were euthanized by gunshot. Owner turn-ins were shot immediately.”

There is no animal control presence on Rocky Boy’s Reservation, Wilke says.

“Their customary response to the ‘dog control issue’ is to conduct round ups which result in the animals being hunted and shot,” she says.

In the last three years, RezQ has saved and found loving homes for more than 800 dogs, Wilke says.

Katniss, who's eye had to be removed because of a porcupine encounter, was evacuated.

Katniss came to RezQ Dogs with a porcupine-injured eye that had to be removed.

Wilke says Dodson’s heavy rains began several weeks before the June 4 flood hit. Fearing the weather would worsen, RezQ Dogs transported 11 of its dogs to a boarding kennel 180 miles away in Great Falls. Eight dogs remained in the group’s care when the flood struck, and they were evacuated by boat. Some of these displaced dogs have been taken in by shelters and rescues in the region, but the demand on RezQ Dogs to take in imperiled dogs from the reservations has not slowed down.

“We are looking forward to making the necessary improvements to continue helping dogs from the Fort Belknap and Rocky Boy’s Indian reservations,” Wilke says. “Everyone at RezQ Dogs is very grateful for your support!”

Donate so we can keep helping pets when disaster strikes.

Evacuation by boat.

Evacuating RezQ Dogs by boat

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Autistic Boy Finds Friend in Once-Neglected Chihuahua

Your donations and our Pedigree grants are helping Madison County Pet Shelter in Huntsville, Ark., save pets in its rural, low-income community. Shelter board member Anne Greene tells us about two of the dogs our grant helped save:

Ricke

Rickie, later known as Fergus

“Rickie was found near death and brought to the Madison County Pet Shelter in March 2013. His left eye was badly damaged, he could barely walk, and his weight was so low that his hip joints were starkly evident. Caren, the shelter’s manager, took him home with her each evening for nine weeks and nursed him back to health and a good weight.

“Recently Henry,  a 5-year-old boy with autism spectrum disorder, came to the shelter with his grandma and 5-year-old cousin. The boys always want to visit our shelter to see the animals when they visit their grandma. When Henry sat on the shelter floor, Rickie came right to him and stayed with Henry until he left. Henry had always been a bit leery of dogs, his grandma said, but never showed anxiety with this one. ‘Some dogs really seem to understand children’s needs,’ she said.

“Over the next several days, Henry kept talking to his Grandma Sue about Rickie. Except Henry knew Rickie’s real name: Fergus. Sue said she had read a story to Henry when he was 2 about a dog named Fergus, and once Henry saw Rickie, he talked non-stop about ‘Fergus.’

“Of course, Henry adopted Fergus, and Grandma Sue reports that Fergus and Henry are fast friends. She said that Fergus took to his new home immediately and noted that her grandson’s ability to interact with others is improving.

“We are too small and under-funded to be a no-kill facility but do not euthanize arbitrarily at X number of days. We work hard to place animals, and Petfinder Foundation’s Pedigree Operational Grant for 2012 helped in that effort. Henry and Fergus are deeply grateful.”

Greene also tells us about Blondie:

Blondie

Blondie

“Blondie, a Great Pyrenees mixed maybe with some Setter, came to the home of Denise in rural Madison County, Ark., in April 2013 with no traceable clues. But Blondie (a he, not a she) had been so well-trained and was so well-behaved that we think he might have been a service or therapy dog. When a person touched him lightly, he would stop and stay by that person’s side. Denise was heartbroken to take him to the shelter but she could not keep him. Our shelter manager found a loving home for this beautiful, courteous dog, an outcome supported by the Petfinder Foundation’s generosity.”

The money came at just the right time, Greene says:

“The Petfinder Foundation 2012 Pedigree Operational Grant helped us continue to give abandoned dogs food, safety and health. The Madison County Pet Shelter is a 501(c)(3) in a poor, rural Arkansas county where the long-engrained cultural attitude toward pets as possessions first and companions second means that our base of support is limited. The county government, which had been giving the shelter $1,000 monthly, cut its funding to $500 monthly in January 2013 because of its decreased tax revenue.

“Though we had planned to use the money for dog food, we received two unexpected gifts that changed those plans: In December 2012, three grade-school classes conducted a fundraiser from which they gave our shelter $1,000, and a local bank was so impressed with the children’s work that they gave us a $500 Wal-Mart gift card. In March 2013, another local bank’s employees selected our shelter as that quarter’s recipient of their ongoing Jeans-on-Friday fundraiser. They gave us $1,920.

“We had purchased $100 of dog food during late 2012, then decided to use the balance to support more adoptions and vaccinations through our adoption-support account, which subsidizes the cost of adoptions for qualified adopters.”

Donate to help us save more homeless pets.

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Cooling Grant a ‘Game-Changer’ for Tucson Shelter Dogs

BEAR - pacc

Bear cools off at Pima Animal Care Center in Tucson, Ariz.

Your donations to our Summer Cooling Campaign are saving lives at Pima Animal Care Center (PACC) in Tucson, Ariz., by helping the dogs there get adopted. The shelter used our Summer Cooling grant to install an overhead misting system in two visitation yards, meaning potential adopters can now comfortably spend time getting to know the resident dogs.

“It’s a game-changer,” Animal Care Advocate Justin Gallick tells us. Here in Tucson, temperatures have already topped 111 degrees, and before the outdoor misting system was installed, potential adopters did not have a cool, comfortable place in which to visit with the shelter’s dogs. “Now they can take the time necessary to make that bond,” Gallick says.

Two brother kittens enjoyed catsicles at PACC.

Enjoying catsicles at PACC

As part of Petfinder’s Summer Pet Safety campaign, we’ve challenged Petfinder.com visitors to help us raise $10,000 to keep 10,000 shelter pets cool and safe. (You can donate here to help.) PACC’s grant was possible because of your donations, and it is making a big difference to the shelter’s adoption numbers, Gallick says. (Find out how pets are keeping cool at our first Summer Cooling grant recipient, Humane Society of Southern Arizona.)

When we visited PACC to check out its new misters, we brought along kiddie pools for each of the yards. We also made cooling catsicles to share with the shelter’s cats (get the recipe for catsicles here), and pupsicles that we made by freezing low-sodium chicken broth in an ice cube tray.

Tipper loved her pupsicle.

Tipper loves her pupsicle.

The grant came at just the right time, since the shelter – which takes in nearly 25,000 lost and homeless pets a year – is currently being inundated with unwanted litters (read our previous blog post about PACC).

“It’s raining puppies and kittens,” Adoption Coordinator Ellie Beaubien says.

Adelle was adopted the afternoon after she enjoyed pool fun in PACC's visiting yards.

Adelle has since been adopted.

While the misters in the visitation yards certainly make adopters more comfortable, they also give the shelter’s nursing-mother dogs a place to take a break from their puppies, Beaubien says. Before the summer, staff members would give each nursing mother half an hour of exercise and fresh air in the yards – but when the high temperatures arrived, that became too dangerous.

Now, thanks to the misting system, “nobody’s getting overheated,” Beaubien says. “We really needed those. It was a great investment.”

Donate to help us keep 10,000 homeless pets cool, and Orvis will match your gift!

 

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Animals Suffering in Colorado Wildfires

Zed is tiny and adorable

Our grant to The Gabriel Foundation is helping protect Zed the lovebird.

With Colorado wildfires still raging, our disaster grants are helping to reunite evacuated pets with their families and to protect 950 homeless birds from the deadly effects of smoky air.

After the state’s most destructive wildfire broke out near Colorado Springs on June 11, we rushed $3,000 to the Humane Society of the Pikes Peak Region (HSPPR), which has cared for nearly 1,000 animals affected by the disaster. We also sent $1,500 to The Gabriel Foundation so it could purchase the expensive air filters it needs to protect the delicate respiratory systems of the 950 homeless Parrots and other birds in its care.

Nelson, the Elderly Parrot

Our grant is helping Nelson the senior Parrot.

“We are downwind from the fires, and because we use swamp coolers and birds’ respiratory systems are extremely delicate, our birds’ health is greatly at risk,” The Gabriel Foundation’s Administration Manager Jennie Wyrwicki tells us. “We need to make sure we have filters running constantly.”

HSPPR’s Grants and Corporate Relations Manager Marsha Wayman tells us that her organization has already reunited 315 animals with their grateful families. Many displaced pets are or were in the shelter’s care because their pet parents were evacuated and had to bring their pets to the shelter for temporary care, Wayman says.

HSPPR also went into homes to retrieve pets who had been left behind, like Callie, below. When Callie’s family was forced to evacuate, she was hiding and they could not find her. They were thrilled HSPPR was able to save her life.

Callie's Happy Reunion

Callie was reunited with her grateful family at HSPPR.

We’re proud to be supporting these happy reunions and the hard work Colorado’s animal-welfare organizations are doing to save animal victims of the disaster.

Donate today so we can save more pets when disaster strikes, and Orvis will match your gift!

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Help Us Keep 10,000 Shelter Pets Cool this Summer!

Samantha Esquivel and Sara Gromley from the Humane Society of Southern Arizona share frozen treats with adoptable Benson.

HSSA‘s Samantha Esquivel, left, and Sara Gromley share homemade frozen dog treats with adoptable Benson.

As part of Petfinder’s Summer Pet Safety campaign, we’re challenging Petfinder.com visitors to help us raise $10,000 to help keep 10,000 shelter pets cool and safe this summer. (Donate to keep shelter pets cool here.)

Dewey loved playing in the kiddie pool.

Dewey plays in the kiddie pool.

The funds raised will go towards Summer Cooling grants to help shelters purchase misters, sun shades and other cooling devices.

We visited the first grant recipient, the Humane Society of Southern Arizona (HSSA), this week. HSSA, which takes in about 10,000 pets each year, received $1,000 to help keep its animal residents cool as temperatures in Tucson hit triple digits over the summer. HSSA Public Relations Lead Samantha Esquivel showed us some of the ways the shelter keeps pets comfortable in hot weather (and you can too):

Benson Frolics

Benson cools off in a kiddie pool.

1. Fresh, cool water – for both drinking and playing in – is key for keeping dogs like Benson, a 9-year-old flat-coated retriever, safe and happy. Not only does Benson benefit from HSSA’s overhead misting system, he loves the shelter’s sprinklers and kiddie pool, which you can set up at home.

2. Homemade frozen treats – such as a Kong toy stuffed with peanut butter and kibble stuck in the freezer for several hours – are an easy way to keep your pet entertained and cool. You can try our recipe for catsicles to give your feline friends a frosty, tasty snack.

3. Shade sources – such as trees, dog houses or the sunshades HSSA uses in its visiting yards – are crucial when your pet is outside. But even if plenty of shade is available, be sure to limit your pet’s time outdoors and watch closely for signs of heatstroke (learn the symptoms of heatstroke).

Sibling 9-week-old kittens Emmit, left, and Lily enjoyed their catsicles.

Emmit, left, and Lily enjoy their catsicles.

“The best part of our dogs’ day is when they get to let loose in the visiting yard with volunteers, but we always have to be vigilant about heat and usually cut playtime short,” HSSA Public Relations Coordinator Sara Gromley tells us. “Thanks to a grant from the Petfinder Foundation, we’re able to extend the fun!”

Robbie the 1 1/2-year-old Red Tabby loved his catsicle treat.

Robbie, a red tabby, loves his catsicle.

Check out Petfinder.com’s Summer Pet Safety campaign for more cooling tips.

Are you with a Petfinder member shelter? Apply for a Summer Cooling grant here.

Donate to help us keep 10,000 homeless pets cool and Orvis will match your gift!

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A Maltipoo Is Thrown Over a Shelter Fence

Tippy Sits in the Grass

Tippy is available for adoption at k9.5 Rescue.

When Tippy the Maltipoo was thrown over a six-foot-high shelter fence onto concrete, our grant from Orvis — which matches donations dollar-for-dollar up to $30,000 — arrived just in time for k9.5 Rescue in Greenville, S.C., to save her life.

“She was literally on the verge of death, with a heart rate of 36,” k9.5 President Allison Rathert tells us. “During a period when we only had a few hundred dollars in the bank and an emergency-room fund that was soon to be maxed out as a result of Tippy’s visit, the $1,000 grant allowed us to cover a life-threatening crash and do what we needed to do to save her.”

The 2-year-old dog’s left hip was completely out of its socket, and she suffered nerve damage, too, Rathert says. Tippy spent three days in critical care. Veterinarians also diagnosed her with Addison’s disease, an adrenal condition that affects dogs like Tippy for life.

Despite her acute injuries, chronic condition and the past abuse she suffered, Tippy was cheerful, affectionate and friendly. After three days in the hospital, she entered a foster home for an extended recovery and is up for adoption (learn about adopting Tippy here).

“Tippy is currently doing remarkably well and responding to her medication,” Rathert says. “She is back to her feisty, active and joyful self.”

Bryson Sitting in the Sunlight

Now that his eye has healed, Bryson is available for adoption from k9.5 Rescue.

After paying for Tippy’s care, k9.5 still had $200 in grant funds remaining. Rathert says she put that money toward medical treatment for Bryson, a 2½-year-old Great Pyrenees suffering from entropion. The painful eye condition caused Bryson’s lower eyelid to curl inward and scratch his cornea.

“Bryson has recovered successfully and his eye looks fantastic,” Rathert says. “He has not squinted or had drainage since.”

We’re proud that our grant allowed k9.5 to help these two beautiful dogs.

“The joy and immense relief that flooded me upon opening the envelope simply cannot be described accurately,” Rathert says. “It was literally a lifesaver.”

Help us save more homeless pets like Tippy and Bryson!

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Saving a Pregnant Pit Bull and Her Puppies

Sunny is available for adoption

Sunny is available for adoption at Utah Animal Adoption Center.

When Utah Animal Adoption Center in Salt Lake City rescued a very pregnant Pit Bull from an abusive situation, our grant from Orvis — which matches donations dollar-for-dollar up to $30,000 — helped pay for the mother’s and her seven puppies’ medical care.

“Sunny was extremely malnourished,” Resource Development Director Samantha Johnson tells us. “You could see her ribs.”

Despite being badly mistreated, Sunny had a gentle and loving temperament that endeared her to the staff. Five days after the shelter took Sunny in, they helped her have her pups.

“She was the sweetest thing ever,” Lead Shelter Assistant Lindsay Ortega says. “She let us assist her, she let us rub her belly, she let us clean her babies off. She was the best momma.”

One of Sunny's seven puppies.

One of Sunny’s seven puppies

The grant helped the shelter pay for Sunny’s spay as well as her puppies’ spay/neuter surgeries, microchips and vaccinations. Johnson tells us that the organization took in 1,175 animals last year and found homes for 1,139 of them.

“Our ability to take on a pregnant animal, rehabilitate her, and find homes for her puppies is greatly impacted by the funding we received from Petfinder Foundation,” Johnson says.

Four of Sunny's seven puppies; all are up for adoption at Utah Animal Adoption Center.

Three of Sunny’s seven puppies

Donate to help homeless pets, and Orvis will match your gift!

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