Skip to content
Donate

Author: Emily Fromm

Clarisse at Heart of Texas SPCA

If you donated to the Petfinder Foundation’s Disaster Fund, your gift helped countless pets survive freezing temperatures and power and water outages in Texas.

Here are just a few of the adoption groups to which the Petfinder Foundation sent Disaster Grants thanks to donations like yours:

Maxine at Heart of Texas SPCA

Heart of Texas SPCA in Boerne suffered damage to its outdoor kennels. “The amount of snow we received caused our tarp covers to rip away from the frames,” says Director Paula Oberle. “The kennels became filled with snow, too wet and cold to use.” The group rescued several dogs from the street during the deep freeze, including Clarisse (top) and Maxine (above) and her puppies.

Roxie at Texas Best Choices

Texas Best Choices Animal Rescue in Quinlan had to purchase heat lamps, space heaters, and other equipment to keep its 65 resident animals warm. “The Texas winter storm hit us hard,” says co-founder Karen Cadis. “The overall electric bill will also be much more than normal: It’s projected at over $1,000.

Carlos at Footbridge Foundation

Footbridge Foundation in San Antonio lost heat and power, but still provided emergency shelter to animals who would otherwise have been exposed to the elements. “Out of the 20 additional animals that we were able to rescue just before the storm, five needed immediate and extensive medical care,” says President Wendy Bennett Black.

Sulfur at Missy’s Haven

Other organizations we’ve helped so far include A Doggie 4 You in Pipe Creek, which took in 42 dogs needing emergency shelter and Missy’s Haven in San Antonio and NaNook & NaKoda’s Big Paw Rescue in Brownwood, both of which lost heat and power.

It’s only thanks to donors like you that we are able to help during times of disaster or crisis, and we are incredibly grateful.

Thank you for all that you do to help pets in need.

donate.jpg

 

Further Reading

Author: Emily Fromm

Collins at Operation Kindness

When a devastating winter storm hit Texas last week, most residents lost power during freezing temperatures. Millions continue to lack heat and water — including animal shelters.

“We had a pipe freeze during the winter storm, [so] our rescue has no water,” says Marlene Heavner of Cowboy Capital Pet Assistance League in Bandera. “We are harvesting snow and rainwater runoff for our dogs.

Like them, adoption groups statewide are doing whatever they can to keep their pets safe. We are rushing them disaster grants to help. Below are a few of the groups we’re assisting.

Annie at Cowboy Capital Pet Assistance League

Cowboy Capital Pet Assistance League is not only without running water, it also needs heat lamps to warm its kennels during the record low temperatures. “We don’t have heaters as we have never needed them before,” says Heavner.

Ace at Operation Kindness

Operation Kindness in Carrollton flooded after a pipe burst. “We have also been experiencing power outages all week, making it impossible to keep the shelter warm,” says Grants Manager Amy Udell. “We are trying to place the animals currently at the shelter into foster care.”

Bella at Fort Worth AC&C

Fort Worth Animal Care & Control is rescuing pets left outside to suffer in the frigid temperatures. “Calls for animals without shelter outside have increased exponentially,” says Shelter Superintendent Jessica Brown, “and our field staff has been responding as quickly as possible.”

Bobbi Jeanne at Safe Haven Cat Sanctuary

At Safe Haven Cat Sanctuary in Haslet, “we had to borrow a generator to provide heat for the shelter so the cats would not freeze to death,” says Debra Jeanne Crafton. “There are permanent residents [with] fragile immune systems, which means exposure to extreme weather conditions could be fatal.”

We can only only help these groups because donors like you support the Petfinder Foundation Disaster Fund. Your donation today will help even more pets.

donate.jpg

 

Further Reading

Author: Emily Fromm

Your donation to the Petfinder Foundation Disaster Fund made a real difference to pets who lots their homes during the West Coast wildfires that took place earlier in 2020. Here are some reports we’ve received from the shelters and rescue groups we helped:


Whitman County Humane Society
Thanks to our grant to this Washington State shelter, staff traveled to Malden, Wash., after a fire destroyed the town. They brought supplies, shared resources, performed visual exams, and caught and took in cats in need of medical treatment [pictured above]. Leftover funds were used for the care of the cats that were taken from Malden.

“We went to Malden on a mission,” says Director of Shelter Operations Ashley Phelps. “We had been told that there was a feral kitten, whom they called Chase [top photo], who would not let anybody catch him. Many tried, and one person was even bitten in the process.

“Chase was badly burned. When he walked, it sounded like someone was walking on dead, dry leaves. This was well over a week after the fire and we knew that time was running out for him as infection set in.

“Thankfully, we caught him and one of the technicians who treated him fostered him and eventually adopted him. He has some permanent damage, but is living a happy, healthy, and spoiled life with his new family!” Read the grant report.


Saving Grace Pet Adoption Center
Our grant to this Oregon shelter helped cover the cost of caring for 55 pets who were evacuated from their homes during a wildfire and temporarily boarded at the shelter.

“This grant helped one cat [pictured above] whose family lost their home in the fire,” says Executive Director Megan Gram. “Thankfully, they were able to grab him in time to evacuate. Many of the families to whom we provided assistance were not able to find their cat in time and were forced to leave them behind. When the man who owned the cat came to pick her up, he told us that it meant so much to him to have her back because she was all he had left. We were so happy to be able to reunite them once he’d found a temporary place to stay.” Read the grant report.


Exotic Bird Rescue of Oregon
Because birds are so sensitive to air quality, they are particularly vulnerable to wildfire smoke. Our grant helped EBR provide medical care to parrots it took when their families were evacuated from their homes.

“Isabella and Zach [pictured above] are parrots who belong to a family that evacuated during the severe wildfires we had this fall,” says EBR board member Tarie Crawford. “They were brought to EBR to be cared for while the family sheltered to wait out the fires. Upon returning to their home, the family discovered that the home had burned down.

“Isabella, a 21-year-old green-wing macaw, was treated with medications for an infection. The family is relieved and glad that their birds are safe with us until they can rebuild their home and create a safe space for them again.” Read the grant report.

Siskiyou Humane Society
Our grant helped this California shelter provide extra food and supplies for more than 100 animals displaced by the Slater Fire and helped cover expenses to send a team out for boots-on-the-ground rescue.

“We received many cats from the Slater Fire after no one had claimed them,” says the shelter’s executive director, Kim Latos. “Buck [pictured above] was my favorite; he was a beautiful manx kitten. All the cats have been adopted.” Read the grant report.

Your donation to our Disaster Fund helps us help more pets like these.

donate.jpg

 

Further Reading

Author: Emily Fromm

We asked the shelters and rescue groups that received grants from the Petfinder Foundation this year to send us their favorite rescued-pet transformations of 2020.

Here are just a few of the submissions we received.

Many of these images are graphic. But these are the realities that animal rescuers face on a daily basis. Thank you to the shelter staff and rescue-group volunteers who work around the clock to save these vulnerable pets.

Your donation today can help change more pets’ lives.

The Most Amazing Transformations of 2019:

The Most Amazing Transformations of 2018:

The Most Amazing Transformations of 2017:

The Most Amazing Transformations of 2016:

The Most Amazing Transformations of 2015:

The Most Amazing Transformations of 2014:

donate.jpg

 

Further Reading

Author: Emily Fromm

Cally was a rescue dog from the Brittany Spaniel Association. He especially loved my husband Michael HD and only tolerated women. When he passed away at age 17 years, he was dreaming of chasing rabbits and squirrels.–Jere Hopkins-Doerr

Further Reading

Author: Emily Fromm

An evacuee’s rabbit being cared for by Saving Grace

As wildfires ravage the West Coast, we’re helping shelters and rescue groups care for the animal victims.

Saving Grace Pet Adoption Center
We’ve sent a Disaster Fund grant to Saving Grace Pet Adoption Center in Roseburg, OR, which is taking in pets belonging to locals forced by the Archie Creek Fire to evacuate.

“Douglas County, along with the entire state of Oregon, is dealing with wildfires on a scale we’ve never seen before,” says Executive Director Megan Gram. “We currently have two wildfires causing level-three go-now evacuations for about 3,000 local residents. The fire which is impacting us most is the Archie Creek Fire. It is currently burning at 121,000 acres and is about 10% contained.”

A cat at Saving Grace

The shelter is also offering free pet food and crates for residents in need. “We are now starting to see strays who we assume were left behind by owners who did not have time to get them out,” Gram says. “We believe we will see more and more strays, whom we hope to be able to reunite with their owners in the coming weeks. We are reaching out to other counties in our area to see how we can help as we have additional space available to take in more animals as needed. We are currently caring for 43 evacuated pets on top of our existing shelter population.”

Petfinder Foundation grant funds will be used to provide care for displaced pets as well as strays who may have injuries sustained from the fires.

Evacuated chickens at Sanctuary One

Sanctuary One
We’ve granted additional disaster funds to Sanctuary One in Jacksonville, OR, where the Almeda and Obenchain fires have caused massive evacuations of both animals and people.

“We have taken in more dogs from our county shelter (four are being officially signed over to us and two will be held as fosters for the county),” says Executive Director Megan Flowers. “We are also working with our local law-enforcement community to help rescue farm animals in evacuation sites.”

Grant funds will help pay for dog food and vet bills for the dogs pulled from Jackson County Animal Services, as well as gas and staff time required for the farm-animal rescues. The shelter is working with more than 40 farm animal rescues/evacuations and receiving new calls every hour from the sheriff department to assist in more farm-animal rescues.

A burned cat at Whitman County Humane Society

Whitman County Humane Society
Another disaster grant recipient is Whitman County Humane Society in Pullman, WA. On Sept. 7, a wildfire destroyed most of the homes and buildings in the small towns of Malden and Pine City. Because the fire was moving so quickly due to high wind speeds, many people were forced to evacuate quickly, leaving behind their belongings and their pets.

“As the fire has gone out, people’s animals are returning to the area burned and injured,” says Director of Shelter Operations Ashley Renae Phelps. “We have been taking in all of the unclaimed animals as well as helping match lost pets to their owners.”

Grant funds will support staff working to catch stray burn victims and pay for these injured animals’ medical care. “We have already received five cats from this situation with vet bills totaling over $3,000,” Phelps says. “There is a known feral colony of about 30-40 cats living in the Malden area who, if alive, will need assistance.”

A bird at Exotic Bird Rescue Center of Oregon

Exotic Bird Rescue of Oregon
We sent additional funds to Exotic Bird Rescue of Oregon in Springfield, which has been asked by Greenhill Humane Society in Eugene to help provide shelter and care for exotic birds displaced by the Glendower/Almeda Drive, Beachie, and Riverside fires.

Because the fires are so fast-moving, many exotic-bird owners have been forced to evacuate without their pets’ food, cages, toys, and medications. The rescue’s foster homes have been providing smoke-free havens for the sensitive animals, and Exotic Bird Rescue has been taking food to evacuation centers where displaced pet owners have been staying with their birds housed in carriers or travel cages.

Our grant funds will be used to pay for food, cages, and toys or toy materials, as well as medications and any medical attention that displaced birds might need.

Siskiyou Humane Society staff feeding animals sheltering in place

Siskiyou Humane Society
Another disaster grant will help Siskiyou Humane Society in Mt. Shasta, CA, which is helping pets affected by the Slater Fire in Happy Camp, CA. The shelter has been deployed by Siskiyou County Animal Control as boots on the ground, conducting animal rescue, checking homes for animals, and leaving food and water where animals are sheltering in place after their owners have evacuated.

“Expenses associated with the service provided for this fire include fuel, food, wages, and pet supplies,” says Shelter Manager Kim Latos. “We had to close to accommodate the rescue services, leaving minimal staff. Everyone had to work longer hours. Our new transport van had engine failure and staff used their own vehicles to transport food and supplies and visit the areas deployed to.”

Your donation to our Disaster Fund helps us help more pets like these.

donate.jpg

 

Further Reading

Author: Emily Fromm


This donation is given to honor the memory of beloved Tallulah, a beautiful, sensitive soul who will always hold a special place in my heart. She was extraordinarily gentle and innately intelligent, yet gloriously goofy. She enriched my life in many marvelous ways. I miss her terribly, but cherish the joy she so generously gave to me. I love you, dear girl.–Majada Saucerman

Further Reading

Author: Emily Fromm


In memory of sweet Chuchi, who was a traveling companion, a friend, and loved dearly. When I would walk Chuchi, people would actually stop their cars and ask, “what kind of dog is that? She is so beautiful.” She was indeed. She had these incredible, expressive, knowing eyes. She seemed so wise. She was a rescue at age 5 and lived a happy life to the age of 16. She lived through a leg amputation due to a tumor when she was 13, hospitalization due to severe pancreatitis, and countless other ailments. She was nothing if not tenacious! She had such a strong life force. She will always be in my heart.–Donna Callegari

Further Reading

Author: Emily Fromm

In memory of Honey the Dog, a sweet and happy girl who brought smiles to everyone. I couldn’t have imagined when we met in 2004 that our lives would become inseparable, nor that 15 years wouldn’t be enough time together. Honey’s adorable mix of basset and Lab drew a lot of attention and she loved it. She was a loving dog who just wanted to eat, walk and be with people. Though I worked long hours and made her move a few times, she was always there for me — walking me to the door when I left and greeting me with her tail wagging when I got home. I miss that every day, Honey. And I’ll miss you always. Thank you to Angel Paws Rescue and Petfinder for bringing us together.–Toni Ruberto

Further Reading

Author: Emily Fromm

Are you with a shelter or rescue group impacted by the pandemic crisis? The Petfinder Foundation has grants of up to $1,000 available — apply today.

Coronavirus has impacted everyone — including homeless pets and those caring for them. We reached out to thousands of shelters and rescue groups; all are desperate for assistance. Below, you’ll find the most important ways you can help.

(Use this link to find adoption organizations near you.)

FOSTER (OR ADOPT!)
Fewer pets are being adopted, but they haven’t stopped coming in to shelters. Adoption groups need your help getting them OUT! “With everyone staying home, it’s a perfect opportunity to step up and foster a cat or dog,” says Cathy Boruch of Paws for Life Utah.

And if you’ve been considering adoption, do it now! “It’s a great time, with people spending time at home, to bring a new animal into the household,” says Jacki Dapkus of Surface Creek Animal Shelter in Colorado. “Keep those kids busy training a new puppy!”

DONATE PRODUCT
Groups desperately need pet food and cat litter — and cleaning supplies. “Don’t hoard!” says Julie Edwards of Humane Society of Northeast Georgia. “We need hand sanitizer, bleach, disinfectant wipes, baby wipes, etc.” Bobbi and the Strays in New York has had to close its two locations to the public due to the shortage of hand sanitizer.

You don’t need to go to the shelter to donate; most have online wish lists with links to the most-needed items. “We are asking our supporters to leave their old towels and blankets at home, limit their visits to the building, and donate through our Amazon wish list,” says Patricia Suess at Animal Protection Center of Southeastern Massachusetts. Shelters that are closed to the public can still receive donation deliveries.

VOLUNTEER
Some shelters have told volunteers to stop coming in, but others are desperate for help. Shelters are short-staffed as employees have to stay home to care for their children; many shelter volunteers are over 60 and need to avoid contact. Extra hands are needed to clean, call vet references, take photos for social media, and, of course, socialize the animals.

Any high school or college student who is now without classes would be valued as a volunteer, especially as a dog walker,” says Laura Amlong at Franklin County Humane Society in Missouri. “Interaction with pets can reduce anxiety, and dogs and cats aren’t included in social-distancing recommendations (thank goodness).”

SHARE ON SOCIAL MEDIA
Homeless pets need you to network them. “We need additional exposure for our adoptable animals due to slow-downs or cancellations of off-site adoption events, transports, and adoptions,” says Sharon Banaszak of Humane Society of Cedar Creek Lake in Texas.

Please also use your social media to share your local groups’ other needs. “Our priorities are adopters, temporary fosters, donations via our website, and social media exposure to support all of the above,” says Nicole Schiff of Georgia’s Paws Humane Society.

MOST OF ALL, GIVE CASH
I’ll be real with you. I usually ask you to give to us, the Petfinder Foundation, and we distribute your donations to the shelters that need it most. But right now, everyone needs help. So today, I’m asking you to give what you can to your local shelter or rescue group.

Annual fundraising events that many groups rely on have been canceled, adoption fees are drying up and longtime donors are putting their wallets away. Shelters may literally lose the roofs over their heads. “We are terrified,” says Danielle Stewart of Apollo Support & Rescue in Texas. “What will we do if we can’t afford to pay our mortgage?”

And please give an unrestricted gift. “Lots of people want to donate to specific programs or initiatives, but it’s the shelter workers and animal-care attendants who need the support now more than ever,” says TJ Treviño of San Antonio Pets Alive!.

I know everyone is hurting right now, but the good news is, there are many ways you can help homeless pets in your community. Thank you for thinking of them, and please take care and stay safe.

donate.jpg

 

Further Reading

Author: Emily Fromm

Abi was rescued in 2010 and she was with me for a little bit over nine years. Abi was my best companion and friend during many transitions in my life. She was the most patient, calm and loving dog I could ever have. Across the 9+ years, we lived in eight different cities, including our transatlantic move to Germany 2.5 years ago. During the last year of her life, she enjoyed time in nature hiking with us. Abi passed away very suddenly from an undetected heart condition a day after we got engaged, as if her mission to leave me in the hands of a loving human lifetime companion was complete. We miss her every day. May you be in doggie heaven eating a lot of cheese and getting unlimited belly rubs from the angels. We love you forever, our beautiful wolf❤.–Gloria Cadavid

Further Reading

Author: Emily Fromm

We asked the shelters and rescue groups that received grants from the Petfinder Foundation this year to send us their favorite rescued-pet transformations of 2019.

Here are just a few of the submissions we received.

Many of these images are graphic. But these are the realities that animal rescuers face on a daily basis. Thank you to the shelter staff and rescue-group volunteers who work around the clock to save these vulnerable pets.

Your donation today can help change more pets’ lives.

The Most Amazing Transformations of 2018:

The Most Amazing Transformations of 2017:

The Most Amazing Transformations of 2016:

The Most Amazing Transformations of 2015:

The Most Amazing Transformations of 2014:

donate.jpg

 

Further Reading

Author: Emily Fromm

Max rescued me in 2005 and we were together in this life for a little more than 13 of his 14 precious years. Every day with him was nothing short of a gift. I miss him so much. He was so beautiful, loving, smart and inquisitive….just the most amazing dog I have ever known. He was always there for me with kisses and cuddles, even through some of the toughest times of my life. “Once by my side, forever in my heart” could not be a more accurate statement. I hope all of the pets you help in your organization get the opportunity to find their forever homes and get to experience the love they deserve.–Melissa Lee

Further Reading

Author: Emily Fromm

In memory of our Gracie girl (2007-2019). Thanks to Petfinder, we found two sisters (whom we named Lulu and Gracie) who needed a loving home over 12 years ago. Gracie (on the right) was the sweetest girl with a gentle and loving spirit. Her heart was big and so was her appetite — she was a voracious eater. And she always wanted and usually got a taste of whatever we were eating. She loved her people dearly and always wanted to be close and right smack in the middle of things. She also loved our walks in the park and our trips to the beach. We are heartbroken and Lulu is lost without her sidekick, but we are so grateful for her long, happy, and very spoiled life. Forever in our hearts, sweet girl — you were loved deeply and will be missed dearly. We promise to take good care of Lulu until you meet again.–JoAnn Gomes

Further Reading

Author: Emily Fromm


In memory of Jill, the best friend of Shevawn Eaton, who was taken far too soon this past weekend. She will live forever in her heart.–Carole Devine

Further Reading

Author: Emily Fromm

Please give your furry friends a big hug tonight. We lost our Charlie on Sept. 23, 2019, in an attack occurring in our yard. We didn’t hear anything. We have no idea what it was. If you’re like us, and see the stories about animal attacks or even just coyote/owl/bobcat/mountain lion sightings, but don’t think this could happen to you, please remember our Charlie. Let this be yet another reminder that we have a lot of wildlife that will take advantage of those of us that get too comfortable and don’t take precautions.

In our 8 short years together, you watched me navigate college, marry the man of my dreams, and become a mother to two beautiful children. You have been my constant companion through it all, never complaining and always ready for more cuddles. It is so hard for me to accept life without you by my side.

RIP Charlie. You were so special to us and we will miss you dearly.–Audrey Miller

Further Reading

Author: Emily Fromm


In memory of brave Bauer, the Alaskan Corgi who lived a wonderful 16 1/2 years that included daily walks in subzero weather, salmon fishing, and a myriad of other activities with his adoring family.–Carol Wetmore

Further Reading

Author: Emily Fromm

Shelter dog Cookie with one of her field-trip fosters

We like programs that help homeless pets by breaking down old ways of thinking — like the idea that shelter dogs need to stay in shelters! That’s why we’re supporting field-trip programs, which get dogs out of shelters for a few hours or even days.

These programs have countless benefits:

  • They relieve stress for the dogs, and tire them out so they’re better behaved when they get back to their kennels.
  • They let volunteers collect valuable information about (and take adorable photos and videos of) the dogs in real-world settings.
  • They get the dogs out into their communities, and their adorable faces in front of potential adopters.
  • They attract new volunteers and adopters by offering a low-stakes way to hang out with the dogs.
ACC field-trip favorite Bundles

When Animal Care Centers of NYC (ACC) debuted its field-trip program, the line to volunteer stretched down the block! “The BoroughBreak is a great way to not only give the animals much-needed time out of the shelter, but to gain deeper insight into their behavior from our fosters and volunteers,” says the shelter’s Jennifer DiClemente, “who become adoption ambassadors for great dogs like Bundles.”

ACC’s grant from the Petfinder Foundation will fund the purchase of no-pull harnesses so that volunteers can feel confident handling dogs who need to practice leash manners or have energy to burn — the same dogs who benefit most from getting out of the shelter.

DAWG dog Rocket on his field trip

Denison Animal Welfare Group (DAWG) received a Petfinder Foundation grant to purchase supplies such as collars, leashes, and ID tags for its field-trip dogs. The program has been a game-changer for the Texas shelter: “Dogs are receiving more visitors and increased visibility in our community,” says President Stephanie Phillips.

Hold times are shorter, adoptions are occurring quicker,” and other organizations are more likely to pull dogs thanks to an abundance of information about them, she adds, including “videos, report cards, likes and dislikes, and things the volunteers might not have observed in a shelter setting.”

Ping’s field-trip fosters adopted him!

“The program does so much for our dogs,” says Mirah Horowitz, Executive Director of Hawaii’s Kauai Humane Society, which also received a Field Trip Grant. “It gives them a much-needed break from the stress and boredom of living in the shelter. It improves their socialization by getting them out in new environments and with new people. And, it some lucky dogs’ cases, it results in a forever home!”

One such lucky dog was Ping. “His family was living on Kauai for a temporary work assignment and took him out on multiple field trips. As they were getting ready to return to the mainland, the adopter’s children decided to surprise their mom on Mother’s Day with the gift of unconditional love. The family adopted Ping, and now he is living his best life on the East Coast!

The Animal Foundation’s Papz

Since launching its program in July, The Animal Foundation in Las Vegas has sent more than 150 dogs on field trips to restaurants, parks, and even family holiday gatherings. “These temporary breaks have helped many of our dogs better cope with living in the shelter as they await their forever homes,” says Development Manager Amy Wiles.

The shelter will use its Petfinder Foundation grant to purchase booties for field-trip dogs. “They will protect the dogs’ paws as they venture out into our uniquely hot Las Vegas climate with its scorching surfaces,” Wiles says.

With your help, we can get more dogs out of shelters, where they can de-stress, show off their true personalities and meet potential forever families.

Further Reading

Author: Emily Fromm

This summer, many parts of the country have experienced dangerously high temperatures.

That’s why the Petfinder Foundation has Summer Cooling Grants available as part of our longstanding Disaster Fund.

Our grant helped Adele stay cool.

Our Summer Cooling Grant helped the dogs at Arizona’s Pima Animal Care Center, which used the funds to install an overhead misting system in two outdoor yards. In Tucson, where temperatures can top 110 degrees, the yards had often been unusable for both the dogs and potential adopters.

Now, thanks to the misting system, “nobody’s getting overheated,” Adoption Coordinator Ellie Beaubien said. “We really needed those. It was a great investment.” We also provided the shelter with kiddie pools, which were enjoyed by dogs like Bear (top photo) and Adele (above).

Skylar enjoyed shade, turf and mist.

The Humane Society of Southern Arizona used our Summer Cooling Grant to install a misting system, a shade sail and turf in its yard, which had previously been hard dirt.

Thanks to those upgrades, “It goes from scorching hot to tropical cool within seconds of flipping a switch,” Shelter PR Coordinator Sara Gromley said. “Staff members enjoy taking breaks by bringing dogs out in the yard and it’s actually pleasant to be outdoors. Petfinder Foundation, we love you!”

Nala the donkey chills out.

Our Summer Cooling Grants don’t help only dogs. Lusco Farms Rescue in Iowa used its grant to purchase two large fans and build a multipurpose pasture shelter for the donkeys, mules and miniature horses in its care.

“The grant not only allowed us to make a cooling station, but we designed it to be used as a shelter in the winter as well,” said Treasurer Scott Shehan. “So the donkeys will now be nice and dry even when it rains or snows.”

We don’t expect to see the end of extreme temperatures any time soon, so these severe-weather grants are now a permanent part of our Disaster program. Your donation to our Disaster Fund will help us save lives.

donate.jpg

 

Further Reading

Author: Emily Fromm

Chiarra was found with a ruptured eye.

Your donation to the Petfinder Foundation’s Emergency Medical Fund has helped countless sick and injured pets — including these four adorable kitties!

Chiarra
The sweet 5-month-old kitten was found alone in a Pennsylvania parking lot, one eye ruptured due to infection and the other in bad shape. Taken in by Cherished Cats Rescue Alliance in Lewisburg, PA, Chiarra received good nutrition and care and, with help from our grant, surgery to remove the ruptured eye and repair the remaining one. After recovering, she was quickly adopted by a local family. Read Chiarra’s full story here.

Foster was abandoned in a box with a broken pelvis.

Foster
Foster was abandoned in a box in a vacant lot. He was cold, thirsty, hungry, and terribly injured. Paws of Hope in Stevensville, MI, rescued him and took him to the vet, where x-rays revealed that he had a broken pelvis and dislocated femur, most likely from being hit by a car. With help from our grant, Foster had a complicated surgery to treat his injuries. Three months later, he was adopted, and is thriving today. Read Foster’s full story here.

Marvel was thrown out of a moving car.

Marvel
Marvel was cruelly thrown out of a moving car, injuring his front leg. Under the care of Happy Tails Rescue in Chatham, VA, it became clear that the leg would require surgery, as Marvel was dragging it and it was becoming swollen and abraded. Our grant enabled Marvel to get his foot repaired to prevent pain and further injury. Today, he’s been adopted and can now walk normally, run, play and jump. Marvel has been adopted! Read Marvel’s full story here.

One of Gypsy’s rear feet was missing.

Gypsy
The 6-month-old long-haired calico was brought to Helotes Humane Society in San Antonio, TX, because her owners could not afford the care she needed. She’d been found with one of her rear feet missing and the other partially gone. The shelter’s vet said Gypsy needed part of her leg amputated to relieve her pain. Thanks to our grant, Gypsy got the surgery she needed and was adopted soon thereafter. She doesn’t let her disability hamper her life, and enjoys lots of love and affection in her new home. Read Gypsy’s full story here.

Your donations made happy endings possible for these cats and hundreds of other pets. Thank you for supporting the Petfinder Foundation and helping pets in need!

donate.jpg

 

Further Reading

Author: Emily Fromm


This donation is in memory of Miss Betty, beloved companion to my dear friends Holly Morris and Renee Holoien. Betty’s unexpected departure on April 10, 2019, was a shock to all who knew and loved her … and now miss her so very much. She was such a character. Much love, Jenny

Further Reading