Senior Pet Adoption Grants

American Eskimo Rescue of St. Louis: Senior Pet Adoption Grants Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was used for Lillian, whom we rescued as a senior and who was quite sick with liver disease.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped Lillian stay on her medication, as it covered medications, vet visits, and an ultrasound. With this grant, we were able to do bloodwork and other tests to make sure she was not getting any worse. Lillian continues to do very well in her adoptive home. She is a happy and healthy 13- to 14-year-old American Eskimo dog.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Lillian was rescued from the Humane Society of Missouri. They released her because she was “nippy.” When we rescued her, we took her to the vet and checked her blood and urine. Based on those results, we did an ultrasound that showed that Lillian had gallbladder disease and may have been having “mini” gallbladder attacks, which caused her pain. Since she is now on the appropriate medications, she has improved so much, is not in any pain, and is not nipping! She was doing great and was ready for her new home. In order to get her adopted, we were able to tell the new parents that we could cover her medications and vet visits for the next three years. Twelve months at $150 per month is $1,800. The $1,000 grant helped us with this adoption and gave Lillian the chance to go into a new home and not have to remain in our rescue group. Lillian deserved a forever, loving home!

Lillian was adopted by a family that was used to the American Eskimo dog, as Lillian could be a little snappy, but that was probably because when we got her, she was in a lot of pain. We could not even pick her up, she was so painful. Not any longer! With the help of this grant, we were able to get a complete diagnosis and continued medications for Lillian.

Jackson County Humane Society: Senior Pet Adoption Grants Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was used for the adoption fee and Dasuquin joint-health supplements for one of our senior dogs, Red Run.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We were able to get Red Run adopted. Also, the article about Red Run in the newspaper helped to make the community aware of the shelter’s needs, and we have gotten donations because of this to help with other senior dogs.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Red Run is an 8-year-old, 21-lb male terrier who came to us via a transport from Dade City, Florida. As part of the Saving Death Row Dogs and Cats program, we take in animals from high[-intake] shelters. Red Run was on the list to be euthanized in Dade City because of his age, but because of the transport and great volunteers, we were able to save him. He was the only one of the animals who came on that transport who still needed to be adopted. Red Run is good on a leash and is mellow. He gets along well with other dogs and cats.

Besides the issue of his age, he also has some joint problems and needs to be on a joint-health supplement to help him move better. Red Run was a great dog with a lot to offer, but adopters were concerned about the price of the supplements. He’d had a difficult life and deserved a loving home to live out the rest of his days. We knew he would make a good companion if just given the chance.

The grant money was used for his adoption fee, which was 70 dollars, and Dasuquin supplements, which are $47 for an eight-week supply. We used the funds to purchase the Dasuquin for a two-year period.

We put an article in our local paper about Red Run and the grant that we received. We got a lot of calls from potential adopters and were able to find a man who fit with Red Run’s personality.

Ohio Alleycat Resource and Spay/Neuter Clinic: Senior Pet Adoption Grants Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

To fund medications and other medical costs for a senior cat, Addie, in our care. Addie, thus far, has not been adopted. She is 14 with some urinary issues. She is on medication to help this, but her right person has just not discovered this wonderful girl yet.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant has helped us highlight Addie to potential adopters at the shelter and we tell them that we will provide medication for her after adoption.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Addie is a sweet old girl who came to Ohio Alleycat Resource and Spay/Neuter Clinic (OAR) via our intake program with a local open-admission shelter. Addie has litter-box issues and is on medication and a special diet to help with this. Our vet team and volunteers are giving her great care! Addie prefers to be an only cat. This, coupled with her lifetime need to be on medication, fluoxetine, and the extra cost of urinary-care food, turns off most adopters. OAR is honest in sharing this information and also letting potential adopters know that she sometimes “thinks outside the box.”

As you can see from the photos, Addie is an office favorite and a fine supervisor!

An older cat with health issues is not for everyone, but OAR hopes that by providing an adopter with medication and covering some other expenses, her person will see past the costs and focus on her beautiful (and spirited) personality. She has not been adopted yet. We know her day will come! Meet Addie here.

Animal Aid of Tulsa: Senior Pet Adoption Grants Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Animal Aid received the Senior Pet Adoption Assistance Grant for Theo, a heeler/great Pyrenees mix. We utilized the funds provided to cover Theo’s adoption fee, neuter surgery, and microchipping. We are providing heartworm- and flea-prevention treatment and routine vaccines for four years.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped one of our senior dogs get adopted. Senior dogs are often overlooked when people are searching for a dog, but relieving some of the financial barriers can draw potential candidates’ attention back to these wonderful pets.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We are not sure exactly what happened to Theo before we got him, but it is possible he was hit by a car. It also looked as if he’d had all his teeth removed other than the top canines, which were cut in half. Theo had a dislocated elbow. He also had a severe case of heartworm. He was treated for his trauma-related injuries and heartworm, and a pin was put in his leg. He also participated in physical therapy for several weeks.

Theo has completely beaten the odds against him! He recovered beautifully. His past does not take away from his sweet, loving personality. Theo was recently adopted by an amazing family and is loving life in his new home!

Days End Farm Horse Rescue: Senior Pet Adoption Grants Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Funds are being used to market Daphne as a horse available for adoption. Once an adopter is found, the funds will be used to cover Daphne’s adoption fee ($100), transportation, and food for up to one year from her adoption date.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant is helping get the word out about senior horses like Daphne who are available for adoption.

How many pets did this grant help?

2

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Daphne arrived at DEFHR in 2013 from Howard County, MD. She was with us for eight months before being adopted. She would still be with her owner if her owner hadn’t died this year. DEFHR’s policy is to welcome back rescue horses when the adopter can no longer care for them. Daphne is currently over 30 years old and needs two to three feedings a day (Triple Crown Senior) to maintain her health. She also has issues with her feet which will require extra farrier attention, and has no teeth, which means she will need two dental visits each year as opposed to one, and the additional cost of grain in the winter.

From her Petfinder profile: “Daphne is one sweet, older mare (15.2 HH) looking for her new forever home. Daphne is being offered as a companion only through the Guardian Program at Days End. ‘I am an older, sweet mare looking for a new home since my previous adopter passed away. It is a sad time for me, but I love all my new friends at Days End Farm. I am looking for a new family to love me, groom me and laugh and my really droopy bottom lip! No ladies, I haven’t have any work done — this is all-natural. I have great ground manners and love people.” Meet Daphne here.

Once an adopter is found, Daphne will be moved to her forever home thanks to this grant, thus freeing up a spot for another rescue horse in need.

FieldHaven Feline Center: Senior Pet Adoption Grants Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

FieldHaven Feline Center was awarded a $1,000 grant to be used to help promote the adoption of one of our senior cats, Lawrence Longbottom. The grant money will be used by his adopter to offset expenses associated with his adoption and care (e.g. vet appointments; testing).

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Unfortunately, Lawrence has still not been adopted! This is despite multiple posts on Facebook (below) and our June 18th e-blast (which included a YouTube video). In addition, Lawrence was recently featured in the program for FieldHaven’s annual donation-drive charity event, Classics, Cats & Cabernet, held on September 7, 2019.

June 18th eblast – https://mailchi.mp/fieldhaven.com/id-like-you-to-meet-lawrence-longbottom

Posts on Facebook:

June 18th – https://tinyurl.com/y57tosau
June 28th – https://tinyurl.com/y5d9q565
June 10th – https://tinyurl.com/yys7pnop
June 4th – https://tinyurl.com/yy49ae9m
April 6th – https://tinyurl.com/y5sbfwse

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Just over a year ago, Lawrence Longbottom’s life didn’t look so bright. He was wandering the streets of Sacramento and really needed help. He was taken to the University of California at Davis for medical attention. The veterinary staff fell in love with him, and that changed his life forever. UCD staff reached out to local shelters, asking if they would take Lawrence Longbottom. Lawrence soon found his way to FieldHaven, where he received the additional medical care he needed, as well as a lot of love from FieldHaven staff and volunteers. Being a senior guy, Lawrence doesn’t race around the house chasing toy mice; instead, he prefers to lounge on the couch with his person, watching TV or sleeping at the foot of the bed hoping to catch a glimpse of some birds flying by the window. Lawrence is a professional lap cat and is perfectly happy occupying a lap for the afternoon. If you are looking for a laid-back kitty companion and dedicated lap-warmer, please stop by and spend some time with Lawrence Longbottom. Just step into his room, put him on your lap and plan on staying for the day. He is FIV-positively adoptable and his adoption fee has been sponsored! All cats and kittens have received age-appropriate vaccines and are spayed/neutered and microchipped.

Lawrence is still waiting to find his furr-ever home. Meet Lawrence here.

Bald is Beautiful Hairless & Small Breed Rescue, Inc.: Senior Pet Adoption Grants Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant is being held for Bellaboo’s adopter for her daily medications when the right adopter is located.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant is allocated for the adopter per the grant agreement to help encourage the adoption of a special-needs senior.

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Bella was abandoned at a vet’s office we use for our foster dogs in very poor health due to untreated diabetes and Cushing syndrome. Bella is also blind due to the diabetes. The vet’s office stabilized her and asked that we take her into rescue to find an adopter. Since entering foster care, Bella has lost some weight and is learning to walk outside on a leash with her halo. Bella is a remarkable dog with a huge, loving personality. We are still seeking the right home for her where she will be loved for a lifetime and her medical needs met. She remains on Petfinder. Meet Bella here.

Top Dog Foundation: Senior Pet Adoption Grants Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

As per our request in the grant, these funds purchased Ligaplex II (a supplement to support ligament health), Nordic Naturals Fish Oil, and prescription Galliprant to support the rehabilitation of two torn ACLs (both rear legs) in Buddy, an 8-year-old feist terrier. The adopter received all supplements/prescription meds directly, approximately a 9-month supply. Buddy is doing well, and we are very hopeful that continued supplementation will allow us to avoid any surgery on his knees.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Buddy is part of a bonded pair; his best friend is Bear, a husky mix. We had very little adoption interest in them over a several-month period. Buddy also had torn ACLs in both rear knees, a factor that deterred any applicants we did receive. We were able to provide nine months of supplementation to the adoptive family via the Petfinder Foundation’s help, and add another $1,000 of support through our Bentley Vet Care Grant, which is supported by two other granting organizations. Combined, these funds provide about 15 months of supplements. With your help, Buddy and Bear were adopted in July 2019 by a family that fell in love with them.

How many pets did this grant help?

The grant directly helped one dog, Buddy, by supporting his healthy recovery and adoption. As Buddy is bonded to Bear, and we do not separate bonded pairs, it concurrently helped Bear find an adoptive home.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Bear and Buddy came as a team. Their owner died and they spent far too much time in a shelter, terrified until the shelter folk figured out to house them together. Then life seemed better. They are kind dogs who won a lot of hearts when Top Dog volunteers first met them. Neither of them showed any aggression after all the changes they had seen, they were simply shy and need time, attention, and kindness in return. Their tails worked just fine and they both accepted head kisses (personal experience there.) Bear and Buddy are approximately 8-10 years old.

Buddy was adopted in July 2019. Buddy is a resilient, ever-cheerful and happy terrier mix: His tail has been likened to a metronome, waving gaily all day long. He is inseparable from his best friend, Bear, a husky mix who watches out for his smaller friend. Both dogs were surrendered to a Tennessee county animal facility in February when their person died. No adopter stepped forward in Tennessee, and the dogs came up to Minnesota-based Top Dog Foundation in March to seek adoption here.

Buddy gives every appearance of a happy, active and energetic fellow, even though vets found he had torn two ACLs in his rear legs. Given his overall health and his capacity to enjoy daily life, Top Dog Foundation — with the cooperation of its vet partners — chose to try nutrition and supplements to support Buddy’s healing to see if he could thrive and recover without surgery. (Dogs his size may actually grow new tissue that can stabilize such injuries.) Those supplements added up in costs, however, and finding an adopter to take on those costs proved difficult.

Enter the Petfinder Foundation, which provided a Senior Pet Adoption grant to help with Buddy’s adoption by purchasing nearly a year’s worth of supplements. Problem solved: In July, Buddy — with Bear — went home to a new family. Buddy’s happy “let’s go for a walk” trot was almost immediately matched by the family’s 5-year-old boy while Bear accompanied a parent nearby. We love happy new beginnings!

Gerda's Equine Rescue, Inc.: Senior Pet Adoption Grants Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money from this grant covered our senior horse Sheza’s adoption fee as well as her yearly knee injections for her arthritis.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The senior pet grant helped us find our senior horse Sheza a new home, opened up a space at the rescue so we could help another horse, and made a connection to a new foster family! Thank you, Petfinder Foundation, for helping us find great homes for our senior horses!

How many pets did this grant help?

3

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Sheza is an 18-year-old well bred, registered quarter horse who was used as a broodmare for most of her life. She was rescued from auction in 2017 and was adopted out as a light trail-riding horse. After about three months in her new home, she was returned to us for being barn sour (a form of separation anxiety in which a horse wants to stay in the barn) and bucking under saddle. We believe that her arthritis in her knees had begun acting up and bugging her more than we had realized and the weight of a rider was making her uncomfortable, so we looked for a retirement home where she could be a companion. Her arthritis is managed with a yearly injection of Legend, which helps to keep her comfortable. She is a sweet horse who gets along well with both mares and geldings and enjoys being brushed and pampered. She participated in our Horse Agility Clinic and would make a great partner for someone wanting to get into the sport.

Sheza was with us for a few months without any interest, but within a day of our posting that her adoption fee was waived and her first year’s knee injections for her arthritis were sponsored thanks to the grant we received from the Petfinder Foundation, we found her a perfect new home! Her adopters also decided to become a foster family and are currently fostering Louise, a neglected senior thoroughbred who came from auction and needs to put weight on to get her ready for adoption. None of this would have been possible without your Senior Pet Adoption Grant! Thank you!

Little Shelter Animal Rescue and Adoption Center: Senior Pet Adoption Grants Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Adopter receives funding to assist with the cost of medication, prescribed food and supplements for the duration of the adoptable senior pet’s lifetime.

From the grant application: “Brynn is an 8- to 9-year-old pit mix who was rescued in June 2017. Brynn came from a local town shelter as a stray. When she arrived at Little Shelter, she was diagnosed with heartworm, had mammary tumors, and had BB pellets lodged in her body. Brynn came to Little Shelter through our Municipal Shelter Program, where we rescue dogs from high[-intake] shelters on Long Island and in New York City.

“Although at the time, her health was very poor, she was still loving, gentle and sweet. Brynn was treated for heartworm and had the BB pellets removed from her body. Brynn has been at Little Shelter for almost two years and has been diagnosed with arthritis and kidney disease. Brynn has a friendly, outgoing personality and can often be seen strolling around the shelter with her favorite staff and volunteers. Brynn also loves playing with toys, sunbathing and going for rides in the car for a ‘puppuccino.’ She is a longtime shelter favorite, and we are baffled as to why this beautiful brindle girl is still here.

“Little Shelter has tried several different ways to highlight Brynn. We are stumped as to why this lovely senior girl is being overlooked. If Little Shelter could offer to pay for Brynn’s medication for a year, we are hoping that Brynn will find her forever home. Brynn will be on the following medications for the remainder of her life:

“Gabapentin 300 mg/1 per day – to help with Brynn’s chronic pain that is associated with arthritis
Essentia Pet Omega 3 – for brain and heart health
Dasquin – comprehensive joint supplement for the relief of pain and inflammation
Carprofen 100 mg – non-steroid anti-inflammatory used to treat pain and inflammation due to arthritis
Azodyl/3 pills per day – nutritional supplement for cats and dogs that reduces azotemia, an increased concentration of compounds that impair the kidneys’ ability to filter and eliminate waste”

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant provided incentive to a potential adopter to offset medical costs for a senior dog who had been at Little Shelter for almost two years. Brynn was on several medications and supplements for kidney issues. Little Shelter was able to alleviate the expense of Brynn’s medication for almost a year to her new family.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We are so happy to be able to share with you that Brynn has been adopted! When Brynn first arrived at Little Shelter two years ago, she was very ill. This poor girl’s body was riddled with mammary tumors that encompassed every nipple on both sides of her belly. Mammary tumors are a common problem with unspayed females, but this was one of the worst cases we had seen. Through the determination of Little Shelter’s staff and Brynn’s own will, she made it through all her treatments and was declared cancer-free.

The only thing left to do was to find Brynn the perfect home. During her time at Little Shelter, Brynn made friends with every staff member and volunteer. She spent her days hanging out in the adoption office or sunning herself by the front gate, where she could greet visitors in hopes of finding a family of her own. Brynn quickly became a favorite and would enjoy home-cooked meals that volunteers would bring in, as well as occasional car rides, which she loved. One day a family came in looking for a senior dog and Brynn came right up to them, wagging her tail and looking for love. Needless to say, they fell in love with the senior pitty on the spot.

A few days later, staff and volunteers gathered to say goodbye. Brynn was excited to have all her friends come to give her attention, and even more excited when she realized she was going for a car ride. Staff brought her to her new home and helped her family get her all cozy and comfortable. Now she is enjoying the life she’s always deserved – a life of luxury and being spoiled like the queen she truly is. Congratulations, Brynn and your new family!