Shelter Challenge

Basenji Rescue & Transport: Shelter Challenge Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Milo, a 12-year-old rescue, required multiple (3) vet visits including one tumor removal.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The $1,000 covered most but not all of Milos immediate vet expenses.

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

The $1,000.00 grant bestowed upon BRAT has been put to good use in the care of Milo, a senior Basenji who was in need of extensive medical treatment after having none for the prior 30 months.

Milo, a 12-year-old male Basenji, came into BRAT when his owner relocated to a residence where only one dog was allowed. Milo was the second dog in the household at the time. Milo’s first visit to the vet was for heartworm testing, updates of immunizations and a senior wellness panel. He was showing signs of arthritis, crankiness, urination inside the home and had an unknown growth on his leg.

After examining Milo, BRAT was told that he had a couple of slipped discs which were creating some arthritis and swelling which were irritating his bladder. He was given a non-steroid anti-inflammatory and another medication for incontinence. BRAT was also told he had a low heart rate and the growth was diagnosed as a grade 2 mast cell tumor.

Following negative results on the heartworm test the tumor was removed. Finally a third visit was necessary to update the balance of immunizations once the tumor was resolved and the low heart rate did not reappear on subsequent visits.

To date vet expenses for Milo have totaled $1,224.50. The last vet visit was December 10, 2013 and we are happy to advise that Milo, despite his advanced age and health issues, has found a new home.

Canine Estates, Inc.: Shelter Challenge Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Medical care

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

For two dogs in need of medical care.

How many pets did this grant help?

Two

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Cooper: A dog found in the woods with identical cuts to each eye. Reese: Pulled from Polk County Animal Control, an owner turn-in in terrible condition.

Popcorn Park/AHS-Forked River: Shelter Challenge Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was used towards our Res-Q-Fund to help injured animals with surgeries, medications etc.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This money helped our organization to pay for the medical needs of Trinity.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

An East Orange backyard breeder brought in a 4-month-old Rottweiler from the litter he had raised. All had been sold, but Trinity had been born with a congenital handicap. There was no question as to why he was turning her in — obviously this pup would not bring in any money on the puppy market since she had a deformity. Little Trinity has a severely deformed front paw. Her other front leg is also deformed, and is just a tiny stub. Trinity was immediately taken to our medical department for evaluation and x-rays, and was then sent down to us at Popcorn Park for round-the-clock care.

We immediately fell in love with the playful and lovable little girl. Trinity has such a warm and loving personality, and is such a fun-loving little girl that you wouldn’t know there was anything wrong with her. We found out quickly that even with a deformity, she doesn’t let anything slow her down. She is a huge fan of squeaky toys and will take off after any that you throw for her. She also loves other animals and is always up for playing with one. She is our new office mascot by day, and at night, she goes home with our kennel supervisor — who spoils her silly.

A consultation was done with Dr. Russell Howe-Smith, surgeon and owner of Pet PT in Cherry Hill, who has done some amazing work on several of our other handicapped and injured animals in the past. He has taken dogs and cats who would have been left paralyzed due to various conditions, including abuse, and took the time to work with them and get them up on all fours again. Trinity took a trip to Pet PT and as Dr. Howe-Smith was finishing up with a patient and walking by, Trinity took one look at him and began following him around! It was as if she knew this was the person that could help her.

After a thorough evaluation by Dr. Howe-Smith, we are just thrilled to report that Trinity will have a long and healthy life ahead of her. She needs a procedure called a podoplasty, where her front paw will have the two appendages fused together to form one healthy, usable paw. Her other deformed leg is not causing her any pain, so she will just be without the use of that one. After the operation, Trinity will require bracing for about eight weeks and then she will be ready to start life over again in a wonderful new home!

If Trinity had been brought to any other place, who knows what would have become of her? Lucky for her, she came to us and we will do everything in our power to ensure that she gets every chance possible to live a long, full life as a happy and healthy dog.

Old Dog Haven: Shelter Challenge Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Veterinary expenses, which are 73 percent of all our costs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Because we spend nearly $40K/month on veterinary expenses and medications, it allowed us to provide one more needed medical procedure to a senior dog in our care.

How many pets did this grant help?

We will consider it to have helped Satchel, an adoptable dog who had surgery and a dental the day after we realized we had won this grant.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Our example is Satchel, a 10-year-old black Labrador mix. He was taken to a shelter as a stray after the 4th of July; his owners declined to reclaim him and he stayed for nearly two months before ODH was asked to take him into one of our foster homes. He fit in immediately, received a thorough veterinary exam with lab work, and a perianal tumor was found along with a few teeth needing extraction. The procedure to remove the mass (which was benign), clean his teeth and do extractions with dental radiographs plus pain medication and antibiotics cost $1229.60 including the 20% discount from our vet. Our grant covered most of this procedure. He has recovered well and will be posted for adoption very soon. UPDATE as of 1/26/14: Satchel has been adopted!

Airedale Terrier Rescue and Adoption: Shelter Challenge Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Heart worm treatments for two dogs rescued from a puppy mill.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

These two dogs would have died if they had not been treated

How many pets did this grant help?

2

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Evan and Lucky came into rescue when we responded to an appeal from a Kentucky Humane Society that they had raided a puppy mill full of Airedale Terriers. After getting them from the Kentucky Humane Society, we transported them to Michigan and Illinois. When both came back as heart worm positive, we arranged for them to undergo treatment at their local vet offices. They are now heart worm free and available for adoption.

Retrieve a Golden of Minnesota (RAGOM): Shelter Challenge Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was used for the spay and neuter of unaltered rescue dogs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

RAGOM dogs are required to be spayed or neutered before adoption. Though our territory covers five states, we are fortunate to take advantage of a partnership with a low-cost, mobile spay/neuter unit in the Minneapolis area, which is where a majority of our dogs are fostered. Our Shelter Challenge Grant paid for spay and neuter costs for 14 of our rescue dogs, ensuring they would not contribute to pet overpopulation.

How many pets did this grant help?

14

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Early this summer RAGOM agreed to take a pregnant momma from Kentucky. Before she could get on transport she gave birth to 9 adorable puppies. Once they were old enough to travel, they all made their way to a foster home in Minnesota where, before they were adopted, they were each spayed or neutered with grant money from the Shelter Challenge. These special pups are Wren, Gia, Cinnamon, Drake, Romeo, Bella, Ace, Nutmeg and Dozer.

Homeless Animals Rescue Team: Shelter Challenge Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money for this grant was used to defray the costs associated with Lucky, a cat who was burned terribly and left to suffer in a rural shelter who wouldn\’t release him for vet care for 5 days.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant enabled us to help a truly needy animal who was suffering.

How many pets did this grant help?

One but our ability to help that one cat has helped our supporters start a fund to help other truly needy dogs and cats and the fund will now help many others.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Late Friday April 12th, a HART volunteer received a horrific picture with no explanation from a friend who is a vet tech at a Virginia vet clinic. The picture was of a cat brought in by animal control after reportedly being hit by a car. The truth about his injuries would prove to be more horrific.rnrnIt soon became clear that this poor cat had been doused with acid and suffered second degree burns – at the hands of a human. His shoulders neck and the back of his head were raw and riddled with blisters. The acid had even crept into the corner of one eyelid. Most injured animals, when in that much pain, lash out at those trying to help. They can\’t help it, it\’s just nature\’s defense mechanism for them. Not this guy. He was purring and kneading the towel the whole time his wounds were being cleaned.rn rnOnce the volunteer heard his story and saw his pictures, she sent out an email to everyone she knew affiliated with an animal rescue. She knew she had to get this guy help quickly. Within minutes of sending the email, several HART volunteers offered their home to foster this poor guy. HART would ensure he got all the necessary treatment and, more importantly, all the love he could ever hope to receive. The call to action was answered and the troops were in place with battle strategies, ready to go. Except…the rural county shelter wouldn\’t release him. rn rnAccording to the shelter director, they were required to abide by the stray period set forth in the state of Virginia. He was not eligible for release until five days after his intake date, which gave him a release date of April 18th. It didn\’t matter that HART was anxious to save him and ease his suffering. He was a victim once again – this time to bureaucracy. During his five day hold, he had no medication for his pain and no antibiotics or creams to treat his skin.rn rnHART is determined to turn his story around. HART will ensure that \”Lucky\” as we are calling him will not suffer a day longer. rnrnLucky is not in a loving foster home where he is nearly recovered and loving life every day.

Southern Nevada Bully Breed Rescue: Shelter Challenge Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant money was used to help us secure a larger facility to care for the dogs in our rescue.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We received the grant right on time to help us secure a larger facility for our rescue dogs. This new facility is in a central location which is easy for adopters and volunteers to get to, and can house many more dogs than our previous location. In fact, we were immediately able to save 6 additional death row dogs which included 2 seniors.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant has helped over 40 dogs to date.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Daddy is a 6 year old Cane Corso mix. He was surrendered to the shelter by his owner, for reasons unknown. Being quite charming and loveable, he became a volunteer favorite. However, due to his age and being listed as a “pit bull mix,” no adopters expressed any interest in this big boy and he was running out of time very quickly. Because we now had the extra space, we were able to save Daddy and bring him in to rescue. He still hasn’t found a home, but has lots of interest from adopters and we know it’s just a matter of time until we find his perfect forever home! We love him dearly and are so happy we were able to save him.

Rikki\'s Refuge, a division of Life Unlimited of Virginia, Inc: Shelter Challenge Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We used the funds for medical bills for two residents and allowing us to accept an animal we otherwise would not have had the money for.rnrnYour gracious grant was used to help three animals in our care. Sampson, who was born with bad knees that would not bend, making it hard for him to get around. He needed major surgery in both knees. One had been done and we were trying to raise the money for the second. We were short and your grant enabled him to have the surgery. He\’s healed nicely and has been adopted by a family with a five year old boy, who\’s his best friend now.rnrnYour grant gave us the needed funds to take in an animal, Oscar, that another rescue was going to euthanize because he has diabetes. He came to live at Rikki\’s Refuge and you provided him the initial care at our vet\’s and his first bottle of insulin. He\’\’ live the rest of his natural life with us. Unless this elderly man is able to get adopted!! Considers he bites when he gets his insulin shots twice a day …. It\’s probably a given that he\’ll life with us !!rnrnWe spent the remaining funds from your grant to help with the surgery bills of Dawn. One of our residents who is slightly retarded but just as lovable as possible. A volunteer working in her area left an old tarp laying about and she ate part of it. Her surgery was successful and she\’s just as fine and lovable as ever.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Your gracious grant was used to help three animals in our care. Sampson, who was born with bad knees that would not bend, making it hard for him to get around. He needed major surgery in both knees. One had been done and we were trying to raise the money for the second. We were short and your grant enabled him to have the surgery. He\’s healed nicely and has been adopted by a family with a five year old boy, who\’s his best friend now.rnrnYour grant gave us the needed funds to take in an animal, Oscar, that another rescue was going to euthanize because he has diabetes. He came to live at Rikki\’s Refuge and you provided him the initial care at our vet\’s and his first bottle of insulin. He\’\’ live the rest of his natural life with us. Unless this elderly man is able to get adopted!! Considers he bites when he gets his insulin shots twice a day …. It\’s probably a given that he\’ll life with us !!rnrnWe spent the remaining funds from your grant to help with the surgery bills of Dawn. One of our residents who is slightly retarded but just as lovable as possible. A volunteer working in her area left an old tarp laying about and she ate part of it. Her surgery was successful and she\’s just as fine and lovable as ever.

How many pets did this grant help?

Three specifically.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Your gracious grant was used to help three animals in our care. Sampson, who was born with bad knees that would not bend, making it hard for him to get around. He needed major surgery in both knees. One had been done and we were trying to raise the money for the second. We were short and your grant enabled him to have the surgery. He\’s healed nicely and has been adopted by a family with a five year old boy, who\’s his best friend now.rnrnYour grant gave us the needed funds to take in an animal, Oscar, that another rescue was going to euthanize because he has diabetes. He came to live at Rikki\’s Refuge and you provided him the initial care at our vet\’s and his first bottle of insulin. He\’\’ live the rest of his natural life with us. Unless this elderly man is able to get adopted!! Considers he bites when he gets his insulin shots twice a day …. It\’s probably a given that he\’ll life with us !!rnrnWe spent the remaining funds from your grant to help with the surgery bills of Dawn. One of our residents who is slightly retarded but just as lovable as possible. A volunteer working in her area left an old tarp laying about and she ate part of it. Her surgery was successful and she\’s just as fine and lovable as ever.

Washington Animal Rescue League: Shelter Challenge Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Grant funding helped the League address and contain an outbreak of ringworm, a highly contagious fungus, which affected 10 – 15 cats in our care in July earlier this year. We purchased supplies to disinfect the shelter and provide treatment to the impacted animals in our Medical Center, all with minimal impact on adoptions. Supplies included disinfectant, gloves, toys, bedding, oral medication, topical lime sulfur dipping treatment, cultures, and other medical and quarantine supplies.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Even one case of ringworm presents a number of challenges in a shelter environment, and many shelters are unable to treat sick cats and kittens. With grant funding, the League established a set of strict cleaning protocols, designated quarantine space, disinfected the shelter, and provided medical treatment to the impacted animals, which included an oral medication and weekly lime-sulfur dips.Even though all of the cats displaying symptoms were isolated, we also cautiously considered the rest of our cat population in the community shelter areas to be possible carriers. We worked with adoptions staff to communicate with the public about ringworm precautions and discussed how it can affect adoptive families. Because of this our strict cleaning protocols and careful communication, dozens of healthy cats in our care were able to be adopted.

How many pets did this grant help?

10 – 15

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

One kitten in our care, Little Night Music, was treated for ringworm in quarantine for almost 8 weeks. One of the most challenging aspects of treatment is making sure that the animals in quarantine get enough socialization and positive interactions. Because the disease is so contagious, cats with ringworm can’t be kept in community settings or allowed to walk on the floor. Staff and volunteers paid special attention and made sure to spend time handling and loving Little Night Music and the other cats and kittens while in treatment. After several long weeks, the animals completed treatment and when they no longer tested positive for ringworm or exhibited symptoms of the condition, the cats and kittens were made available for adoption. On August 24, 2013, Little Night Music (now Toby) was adopted into a loving forever home at 4 months of age. “Toby is a very curious and energetic kitten who follows me around like a little puppy dog,” wrote Judy, his new adopter.