Shelter+ Challenge

Animal Care Center of St. John: Shelter+ Challenge Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Dog food purchases

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It helped feed our abused and neglected dogs that come in as strays or were taken by the police.

How many pets did this grant help?

20 dogs

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

How beautiful is baby Blue? About a year old, she is turning into a wonderful girl. She would do best in a single-dog home. It’s not her fault she was tied up outside and had to do her best to get food among other dogs from the information we got. She is wonderful on walks and very playful and happy. Consider giving this girl a great home. Meet Blue: https://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/29713501/

Mansfield Animal Control: Shelter+ Challenge Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Mostly vet bills for shelter pets.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

To pay for vet bills and safe lives.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

In July 2014, Goldie was found as a stray in an area that is known as a dumping ground for pets in Mansfield, CT. This small Golden Retriever mix was skinny, filthy and had matted fur. She also had a big tumor hanging off of her belly. Nobody claimed her. The vet diagnosed the tumor as a mammary-gland tumor and removed it. Goldie is recovering nicely and will need a second spay surgery in a couple of weeks. The Petfinder Foundation check was used toward her first surgery, which cost almost $1,000! We were grateful we could save her life! She will be up for adoption once fully recovered.

Senior Animals In Need Today Society (SAINTS): Shelter+ Challenge Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was used for veterinary care.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant enabled us to provide necessary medical treatments to the animals in our care, as follows:

EastRidge Animal Hospital
January 2, 2014
Ollie (dog) – exam, bloodwork, antibiotics
$231.20

EastRidge Animal Hospital
January 16, 2014
Salty (dog) – geriatric neuter, dental (with 19 extractions), pain medication, tissue biopsy (for testicular tumour)
$784.39

Total = $1,015.59

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant helped two dogs.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Local animal control found a senior beagle named Ollie running loose and picked him up. Sadly, his family never came to claim him, so he was brought to SAINTS. When he arrived at our shelter, Ollie was incredibly overweight – 60 pounds! – and was suffering from chronic skin and ear issues. Fortunately, relief was in sight. He was given a medicated bath and put on antibiotics, ear drops, and pain medication for his sore hips. He had his ears flushed and bloodwork done to rule out any underlying causes of his weight problem. Through it all, Ollie remained a good-natured dog and fit in well at SAINTS. With regular low-impact swimming sessions, he even began to lose some weight.

Happily, Ollie was adopted only a few months later by a veterinarian with a soft spot for hefty beagles with health issues. He has settled in well in his new home where all his medical needs are met and he can continue his weight-loss journey.

Salty, an ancient Jack Russell terrier, was transferred to SAINTS from local animal control. As an unclaimed stray, he was in rough shape – skinny with cataracts and a mouthful of rotten teeth. After settling in at SAINTS, Salty was taken to the veterinarian for assessment. Not surprisingly, his bloodwork showed a number of abnormalities, likely the result of his severe periodontal disease. Luckily, however, he was cleared for surgery.

Salty ended up having 19 extractions, as almost all of his teeth were abscessed right to the roots. He was neutered at the same time, and put on pain medication and antibiotics. With his sore, infected mouth finally healing, Salty began to perk up and put on some much-needed weight. A few months later, a woman who had previously adopted a senior dog from SAINTS stopped by to let us know that he had passed away. While visiting our shelter, she fell in love with Salty and decided to once again give a deserving senior a forever family. She reports that he is doing well in his new home.

Loving Companions Animal Rescue, Inc.: Shelter+ Challenge Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

To complete repairs of the facility.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant assisted our organization by helping to provide funds to repair fencing, paint, repair several heating units, and buy cleaning supplies. All of these items aid in making the surroundings more comfortable and enjoyable for the animals in our care.

How many pets did this grant help?

We currently have 123 pets on site.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We took in a dog that had jumped out of the back of a moving truck and broke her leg. The owners did not want or could not afford to give the dog medical assistance and ask that we take her. We provided funds to have surgery done to repair the broken leg and then held the dog while it was healing and then were able to find a new home for her. She is a very pretty and gentle dog and has made the new family a very nice companion.

Canine Estates, Inc.: Shelter+ Challenge Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Medical expenses

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We take in many pets in poor condition. This money helps pay for the medical expenses.

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Piper’s story starts in the streets of Miami, where he was left to fend for himself, only able to drag himself from place to place for food and shelter. He was taken to animal services. Canine Estates, Inc., agreed to take Piper but had no way to make the five-hour drive north to Clearwater, Fla. A group called Pilots and Paws flew Piper to Canine Estates, Inc. Piper was named after the Piper aircraft he flew in on. Piper spent many weeks in a physical therapy center learning to walk again. Once he learned to walk again, he became more and more self-assured. We continued to love and reassure Piper until he was ready to be adopted. Piper has a wonderful life now. He has two humans who love him. He lives on the water, goes for boat and car rides and walks, lives in his own house and takes care of his own yard. Hard to imagine he was once one step away from death’s door.

Hearts United for Animals: Shelter+ Challenge Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

It was used for the veterinary care for a rescued puppy-mill dog named Ghirardelli.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant was used for veterinary care of a puppy-mill dog that had serious health problems.

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Ghirardelli is a little puppy-mill Pomeranian who arrived at HUA with many health problems. She required extensive veterinary care for pneumonia and other respiratory problems before she could have routine health care, and support was very important for her care. She became a happy, healthy little one after she received the care that she needed. We learned that she had been debarked, and that caused damage to her trachea which would not be overcome. Ghirardelli had a tendency to snort when she was doing active things. She was soon adopted and went to a home where her canine siblings are bulldogs. Since they all snort, too, Ghirardelli fit right in. What is most important is that her home is a very happy one for dogs, and Ghirardelli is very loved.

Baltimore Animal Rescue and Care Shelter (BARCS): Shelter+ Challenge Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

As Maryland’s largest open-admission shelter, BARCS does not turn away any animal in need of shelter, food and a loving touch. BARCS grants refuge to every abandoned, neglected, abused, lost or surrendered animal that comes through our doors — totaling over 12,000 animals annually.

The BARCS Medical Care Fund provides ongoing in-house medical care for all of our shelter animals, including antibiotics, vaccinations, testing, parasite control and spay-and-neuter surgery so that they are ready to be put up for adoption to the community. This is where the generous $1,000 Petfinder Foundation funding was used; it enabled us to get almost 35 female dogs spayed prior to their adoption!

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The Medical Care Fund was created to provide the funding for routine medical care for all 12,000 animals that come to BARCS at a cost of almost $500,000 annually. BARCS houses almost 250 cats and dogs in the shelter at any given time, plus over 700 more in foster care. The majority of animals that come to BARCS are not altered, have no proof of a vaccine history, and are often ill due to being neglected or abandoned. Once in the care of BARCS, all animals are vaccinated, provided with flea treatment and dewormer and are tested for various diseases as needed upon arrival. In addition, BARCS spays or neuters all of its animals in the shelter’s surgical suite prior to adoption.

Medical care for the animals at BARCS is the largest part of our budget and where funding for our shelter is always most critically needed. BARCS has dramatically increased the number of animals saved every year, but there are so many suffering, neglected and abandoned pets that still need our help and that require ongoing medical care and where funding from this grant was applied.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant enabled us to spay almost 35 female dogs before they were adopted!

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Sometimes it takes a village to find a forever home, and it’s happy tails like these that remind us how amazing the rescue community can be! Shauna came to BARCS a few months ago after she was left tied to a pole. Neglected and suffering from a skin condition known as Demodex, Shauna’s skin was very uncomfortable and her entire belly was red hot and hairless. Thanks to some networking and old friends, a former volunteer photographer at BARCS saw Shauna’s picture online. It was love at first sight.

Shauna, now named Sunday, is finally home! After a few days at a local vet hospital to recover from her cold and finish up some of her skin medications, Sunday had the first-class treatment and caught a private plane to meet her new mommy in South Carolina! Living the high life as a Southern belle, Sunday’s mastered the fine art of cuddling and loves her new family.

Utah Friends of Basset Hounds: Shelter+ Challenge Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant was used for medical expenses.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Our biggest expense is always medical care for our rescued hounds. We are most grateful for the grant opportunities the Petfinder Foundation offers!

How many pets did this grant help?

Medical expenses for three

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

The money we received was used to help pay our medical expenses. One of our fabulous hounds that was helped was Daisy B. Daisy B., six years young, came to us when her former owner took a job that would not allow him to care for her. One of her eyes had been injured when she was kicked by a horse. Her family told us it had happened when she was younger. Our vet determined that there was no sight in it and the pressure was causing pain for Daisy. We had her eye removed and she recovered wonderfully.

We’re so grateful that she found her way to Utah Friends of Basset Hounds. It’s difficult to know how long she had been in pain from her eye injury. But we do know that she’s happy and pain-free now! Shortly after her surgery, she was adopted by a wonderful couple from the Boise, Idaho, area and is currently traveling across the country with them in their RV. Daisy B. is a spunky, full-of-life girl who is bringing them much joy!!

Big basset-hound thanks to the Petfinder Foundation for making Daisy B’s surgery possible!

Washington Animal Rescue League: Shelter+ Challenge Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Grant funding helped the League provide medical services for homeless animals in our care.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

As a partner shelter assisting overburdened facilities by transferring homeless animals to WARL for adoption, we care for animals who have been exposed to conditions of various shelter environments from different regions of the country. Most have received minimal prior healthcare and some are in need of veterinary procedures that can be expensive or difficult to treat. Further, our medical staff are increasingly treating issues more common in southern areas of the U.S., because we are accepting a greater number of transfers from the south where the overpopulation problem is more prevalent.

For example, we treated an increased number of animals for heartworm in the last six months. Heartworm is cause by a mosquito-born parasite and the disease is more widespread in states with warmer year-round temperatures. Treatment for heartworm is not only costly, but takes three to four months and can have complications. There is only one FDA-approved drug for eliminating adult heartworm in dogs, Immiticide, which is administered by deep intramuscular injection that requires strong pain medications, followed by cage-rest or confinement to a quiet place for long periods during recovery. In addition to the injections and pain medications, dogs receiving this treatment are also administered doxycycline, an antibiotic to kill larvae and reduce adverse effects.

How many pets did this grant help?

8-10

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This grant helped us treat Jacquard, a 4-year-old Pomeranian mix from Alabama, for heartworm disease. Jacquard, who arrived in November 2013, spent many hours of quality time cuddling in the laps of office staff (such as Kelsey Beaumont, WARL’s development associate, pictured) during her treatment and recovery.

Jacquard responded very well to the heartworm treatment and was adopted in February 2014. Her family has kept in touch to remind us just how special she is. They write: “I just wanted to say how awesome Jackie’s been. We had the grandkids over tonight and she let them take a heartbeat and check her ears while playing doctor. She’s absolutely darling. Thanks again.”

Purrfect Pals: Shelter+ Challenge Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Your grant helped us provide medical care for several special-needs cats and kittens.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant gave a second chance to special-needs cats and kittens who needed time, TLC and medical attention in order to become ready for adoption.

How many pets did this grant help?

5

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

At Purrfect Pals, we believe that every cat matters, not just the young and healthy ones. We strive to help cats who are in need of medical care. We welcome cats who need surgery, the intervention of a specialist or expensive medications and treatments which are beyond the means of many cat owners and most shelters. You might say that special-needs kitties are our specialty at Purrfect Pals.

In March, our staff drove from Arlington to Auburn to pick up five special-needs kitties from one of our partner shelters. The Auburn Valley Humane Society had contacted us regarding three sweet little blind kittens who were in need of surgery. The boys, now named Geordi and Ray Charles, will each need to have both of their eyes removed due to birth defects. We are hopeful that we will be able to save one of the eyes of their sister, Justice, who is also visually impaired. These three darling kittens (first photo) are currently in foster care so they can grow a little bigger before their surgeries. We hope to have three happy updates for you soon!

On the same trip, we brought back two adult cats, Jake and Sabrina, who had both been diagnosed with hyperthyroidism. Both are now scheduled to be treated with radioiodine at the Feline Hyperthyroid Center at Cats Exclusive in Shoreline. This treatment is not inexpensive but IS typically very effective. If all goes well, they will be completely cured and ready to be adopted within a month.

Earlier this year, a 6-month-old kitten named Polaris (second photo) was transferred to Purrfect Pals from the Olympic Peninsula Humane Society in Port Angeles. Polaris has a neurological condition, likely the result of head trauma, which makes him more wobbly than other cats. He is also visually impaired, has impulse-control challenges and doesn’t always know when to stop with interacting with other cats and dogs. He also needs medication to prevent seizures. This intimidating list of special needs might pose a challenge for some shelters, but Purrfect Pals is fortunate to have the resources required to provide Polaris with the love and medical care he needed. We are thrilled to report that his story has the happiest of endings! Last month, Polaris was adopted by a wonderful family who were ready to open their hearts and home to a special-needs kitty.

Fifteen-year-old Benihana (third photo), a sweet and quiet older gentleman, came to Purrfect Pals from the Everett Animal Shelter after his lifelong owner passed away. He had glaucoma in his left eye so it needed to be removed, unfortunately. He has recovered nicely, though, and is now ready to find a retirement home! We can’t be certain, but believe Benihana might be a Norwegian Forest Cat mix. What we can be sure of is that Beni is a loving and gentle boy who is waiting for his future family to come meet him in our Woodinville Petsmart adoption center.

All of these kitties had different special needs, but what they do have in common was that they might have died if Purrfect Pals had not had the financial means to take them in. It is the support of cat lovers like you which provides us with the freedom to say yes to these special cats who so desperately need our help!